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The New York Academy of Medicine Honors Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor of New York, with Prestigious …

New York, NY, Nov. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) has awarded its prestigious 2020 Stephen Smith Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Public Health to the Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor of the State of New York, in recognition of his leadership of the state during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Governor Cuomo accepted the award at NYAM’s 173rd Annual Meeting of the Fellows, which was held virtually on November 12. The event included the induction of 66 new NYAM Fellows and Members, whose names were read by special guests Dr. Howard Zucker, Commissioner of Health for New York State, and Dr. Dave Chokshi, Commissioner of Health for New York City. View the full event video  here  and the event program  here

“Every day during the height of the pandemic in New York, we looked to Governor Cuomo for his leadership and compassion as we weathered this extraordinary challenge,” said NYAM President Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “His priority was to safeguard the people of New York, and for that we are forever grateful and inspired by his leadership. NYAM is honored to recognize Governor Cuomo’s significant contributions to public health with the 2020 Stephen Smith Medal.”

Michael J. Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health, introduced the award. Mr. Dowling served in New York State government for 12 years, including as deputy secretary to former governor Mario Cuomo. 

“During a crisis like this, leadership really, really matters,” Mr. Dowling said. “Leadership that tells the truth. Leadership that uses facts and science to guide decisions. Leadership that builds trust. Leadership that unifies, that brings people together, that focuses people on the central mission of how we deal with issues such as this. … Here in New York, as I know you will all agree with me, we have been very, very fortunate indeed because we have Governor Andrew Cuomo, a model of such leadership.”

”When Governor Cuomo designated University Hospital of Brooklyn as a COVID-only facility, we understood the magnitude of that designation and the trust he placed in our frontline staff,” said NYAM Board Chair and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University President Wayne J. Riley, MD. “Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, working with the New York State Department of Health and other partners, we were able to significantly flatten the curve and the spread of the virus by following and adhering to public health guidelines.”

“During these darkest days of COVID, we also saw the light,” Governor Cuomo said in his acceptance speech. “We saw 30,000 retired doctors and nurses return to service to battle the pandemic. We saw 10,000 healthcare professionals from around the country volunteer to come to New York at the height of the pandemic. We saw healthcare professionals become battlefield heroes in saving lives. And we saw the people of New York State rise to the occasion. … I hope and pray a COVID-19-type crisis never happens again, but I believe it will. And your challenge, our challenge, our society’s challenge

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medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine Honors Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor of New York, with Prestigious Public Health Award

The Stephen Smith Medal recognizes Governor Cuomo’s leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic

New York, NY, Nov. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) has awarded its prestigious 2020 Stephen Smith Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Public Health to the Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor of the State of New York, in recognition of his leadership of the state during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Governor Cuomo accepted the award at NYAM’s 173rd Annual Meeting of the Fellows, which was held virtually on November 12. The event included the induction of 66 new NYAM Fellows and Members, whose names were read by special guests Dr. Howard Zucker, Commissioner of Health for New York State, and Dr. Dave Chokshi, Commissioner of Health for New York City. View the full event video here and the event program here. 

“Every day during the height of the pandemic in New York, we looked to Governor Cuomo for his leadership and compassion as we weathered this extraordinary challenge,” said NYAM President Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “His priority was to safeguard the people of New York, and for that we are forever grateful and inspired by his leadership. NYAM is honored to recognize Governor Cuomo’s significant contributions to public health with the 2020 Stephen Smith Medal.”

Michael J. Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health, introduced the award. Mr. Dowling served in New York State government for 12 years, including as deputy secretary to former governor Mario Cuomo. 

“During a crisis like this, leadership really, really matters,” Mr. Dowling said. “Leadership that tells the truth. Leadership that uses facts and science to guide decisions. Leadership that builds trust. Leadership that unifies, that brings people together, that focuses people on the central mission of how we deal with issues such as this. … Here in New York, as I know you will all agree with me, we have been very, very fortunate indeed because we have Governor Andrew Cuomo, a model of such leadership.”

”When Governor Cuomo designated University Hospital of Brooklyn as a COVID-only facility, we understood the magnitude of that designation and the trust he placed in our frontline staff,” said NYAM Board Chair and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University President Wayne J. Riley, MD. “Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, working with the New York State Department of Health and other partners, we were able to significantly flatten the curve and the spread of the virus by following and adhering to public health guidelines.”

“During these darkest days of COVID, we also saw the light,” Governor Cuomo said in his acceptance speech. “We saw 30,000 retired doctors and nurses return to service to battle the pandemic. We saw 10,000 healthcare professionals from around the country volunteer to come to New York at the height of the pandemic. We saw healthcare professionals become battlefield heroes in saving lives. And we saw the people of New York State rise to the occasion. … I hope and pray a COVID-19-type crisis never happens again, but

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health

Police bust New York City party on Halloween; England to enter 4-week lockdown; virus top campaign issue

Multiple countries in Europe are again entering lockdowns as cases surge in the United States, propelling COVID-19 as a central campaign issue yet again in the presidential race.

Former Vice President Joe Biden says President Donald Trump has been unable to control the pandemic: “We’re gonna beat this virus and get it under control and the first step to doing that is beating Donald Trump,” Biden said.

Meanwhile, Trump continues to minimize the virus’ impact. Trump told Pennsylvania voters that his administration has done “an incredible job” dealing with the pandemic. He repeated a months-old promise that the mass distribution of a vaccine was “just weeks away.”

Daily infections are at an all-time high in the U.S. heading into Tuesday’s election, according to Johns Hopkins University.

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 9 million cases and more than 230,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 45 million cases and 1.19 million deaths.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

Police bust New York City party with nearly 400 people on Halloween

Police charged nine organizers in a bust of an “illegal bar/party” that had nearly 400 people in attendance in New York City, the NYC sheriff announced Saturday.

Police shut down the gathering held inside a Brooklyn warehouse early in the morning on Halloween.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Saturday warned against Halloween gatherings that increase the risk of transmitting COVID-19, tweeting “Halloween should be spooky, not scary.”

The guidelines tweeted by Cuomo say parties are particularly risky because they can bring together people from different areas for a long period of time.

— Joel Shannon

British PM announces new, four-week lockdown in England

British prime minister Boris Johnson announced plans Saturday for a four-week national lockdown in England starting this week that will shut pubs, restaurants, entertainment facilities and nonessential businesses.

Schools, universities and manufacturing facilities will remain open during the period from Thursday until Dec. 2.

“Unless we act, we could see deaths in this country running at several thousand a day,” Johnson said.

Johnson said that individuals will only be allowed to leave their homes for specific reasons like medical appointments, shopping for essentials, education and work that cannot be done from their residence.

“No one wants to be imposing these kinds of measures anywhere,” the prime minister said, but added that “no responsible prime minister can ignore” the rising number of COVID-19 cases.

Professor Chris Whitty, chief medical officer for England, told reporters at a news conference that England is experiencing 50,000 new cases daily and that the figure is rising.

Doctors groups rip Trump for touting baseless conspiracy over virus death count

Medical groups are slamming President Donald Trump for resurfacing a baseless conspiracy on campaign stops that doctors are inflating the number of COVID-19 deaths in the USA in order to drive

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health

Travelers to New York must test negative before and after they arrive

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Saturday announced new measures to combat the spread of COVID-19 in the state of New York.
  • Those traveling to the state will need to test negative for the disease within three days of their trip and quarantine immediately upon entering. 
  • After three days, that traveler must also get a second test for COVID-19, and if it is negative, they will be permitted to cease quarantining, the state announced.
  • New Yorkers who are leaving the state for less than 24 hours do not need to obtain a test before returning to the state but must be tested within four days of returning to the state.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Saturday a new travel mandate for people who come to the state. 

Under the new rules, if an individual is traveling to New York, they must test negative for COVID-19 within three days of making their trip, the governor’s office said. Once they arrive in New York, they must quarantine for a three-day period before receiving an additional test for the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. 

If the results of the second COVID-19 test are also negative, a person is permitted to end their period of quarantine. If an individual is traveling from New York to another state for a period fewer than 24 hours, they do not need to be tested before returning but must get tested within four days of returning to New York.

The Saturday announcement replaces a previous policy that required individuals to quarantine for a two-week period if they were coming to the state from a list of more than 40 states that did not meet criteria set by state officials. 

The change comes as the US deals with the latest wave of COVID-19 cases. On Friday, the US reported nearly 100,000 new cases of the virus: shattering the record for the most cases reported in a single day since the pandemic began.

 

While President Donald Trump has continued to blame the increase on an increase in testing for the disease, The COVID Tracking Project reported that the number of positive cases was rising more sharply than the number of tests administered, according to a previous Business Insider report.

While the state of New York saw the most severe outbreak of COVID-19 nationally, it was able to stem the spread of the virus in the spring and summer months. But as temperatures cool and cases spike across the US, cases in New York have also begun to rise.

The positive rate in the state over the past week is about 1.5% over the past week, according to data analyzed by Johns Hopkins University. While that’s lower than the 6.4% rate nationally over the past seven days, it’s higher than the end of summer when the rate in New York dipped below 1%. 

In “focus zones” — areas of the state where officials are

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health

Oak Street Health Reaches Milestone 70th Location With Entry Into New York and Opening of First Walmart Community Clinic

Value-based Primary Healthcare Provider Has Opened Brooklyn Center and First of Three Walmart Supercenter Community Clinics

Oak Street Health (NYSE: OSH), a network of value-based primary care centers for adults on Medicare, is continuing its nationwide expansion and marking its 70th clinic with the recent opening of the Company’s first center in New York and the first of three planned Community Clinics at Walmart supercenters in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

“We founded Oak Street Health with a mission to rebuild healthcare as it should be and we are delivering on that mission by bringing our innovative, proven model of high-quality primary care to neighborhoods across the entire country,” said Mike Pykosz, CEO of Oak Street Health. “We are thrilled to open our first New York location, marking our 10th state and milestone 70th center, but we are just getting started. Our team is energized by the opportunity to improve more lives, and we are proud to be a positive addition to new communities.”

The new openings follow the Company’s rapid growth this summer, opening a dozen new centers between August 3 and September 16, including its first centers in Tennessee and Texas. Oak Street Health plans to add additional centers and operate clinics across 11 states by the end of 2020, including its first Mississippi center. With the capital raised in its recent IPO, the Company is accelerating its expansion plans.

The Brooklyn center is located at 455 Sutter Avenue and Oak Street Health is planning for additional growth in New York. The first Walmart Community Clinic is located in the supercenter at 1213 E. Trinity Mills Road in Carrollton, Texas. Oak Street Health will open two additional Walmart Community Clinics in Arlington and Benbrook, Texas, by the end of 2020.

“We care for the most vulnerable patients, the majority having two or more chronic conditions, who live in neighborhoods that lack access to quality primary care,” said Dr. Griffin Myers, Chief Medical Officer of Oak Street Health. “As we continue to face the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, high quality primary care for these older adults is more important than ever. Whether through our growing base of Oak Street Health centers or through our collaboration with Walmart, we will continue to care for our patients and we look forward to bringing our healthcare model to even more states and cities in the near future.”

Since its founding in 2012, Oak Street Health has driven an approximately 51 percent reduction in patient hospital admissions compared to Medicare benchmarks, 42 percent reduction in 30-day readmission rates and a 51 percent reduction in emergency department visits, all while maintaining a Net Promoter Score of 90 across patients. Oak Street Health will accept multiple health plans at all locations, including traditional Medicare.

To learn more about Oak Street Health’s value-based primary care model, click here.

Source: Oak Street Health

About Oak Street Health

Founded in 2012, Oak Street Health is a network of value-based, primary care centers for adults on Medicare. With a

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health

Combating Pandemic Fatigue – The New York Times

Good morning.

In the beginning of the pandemic we rallied, sending loved ones rolls of toilet paper and handing out fruit to delivery drivers. Now, living under a blanket of restrictions has become a way of life, a daily routine of risk calculation and caution. But cases are once again spiking around the world and many people have what some call “pandemic fatigue.” As my colleagues wrote, “The rituals of hope and unity that helped people endure the first surge of the virus have given way to exhaustion and frustration.” Everywhere you turn there’s a feeling of burnout, which is even more pronounced for essential and frontline workers.

The stakes are high, especially with the holiday season approaching. Gov. Gavin Newsom recently laid out a new set of guidelines around mass gatherings, limiting them to no more than three households at a time.

I spoke to Elissa Epel, professor at the University of California, San Francisco’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, about how to prevent pandemic fatigue from slipping into unsafe behavior. Dr. Epel also curates a website on coping resources during the pandemic.

Here are some of the main points from our conversation.

Stress, fatigue, anxiety and depression are on the rise.

A recent study showed that depression rates spiked three times higher during the pandemic, and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 40 percent of American adults reported problems with anxiety, depression or substance abuse in late June.

However, Dr. Epel said that psychological distress conditions that look like depression and anxiety are not necessarily psychiatric disorders in the classic sense.

“It’s a normal response to what’s happening,” she said.

Adverse mental health effects are linked to being in a chronically stressful situation, especially for people whose lives have been severely disrupted by illness, financial stress or essential work.

Pandemic burnout, in which essential and service workers are stressed to the point that they can no longer do their jobs, can also happen as a result of caring for others. Dr. Epel said that for these individuals, they cannot continue to work in a system that creates burnout and cure themselves at the same time.

“The system has to find ways to really help people restore and have more time for self care,” she said.

The kind of fatigue that the general population has experienced can be linked to physical health conditions or it can be related to shared psychological stressors. Dr. Epel suggests limiting exposure to upsetting news and being kind to yourself and others who are experiencing emotional distress.

There are things you can do to cope.

Everyone should think about what personal care means for themselves, Dr. Epel said. She said this definition was different for everyone. For some, it may mean getting lots of good quality sleep. For others, personal care means long walks in nature or exercise.

Preventing long periods of sedentary behavior can also help most people.

“Creating body stress that we then recover from actually in the

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health

Covid-19 News: Live Updates – The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA, via Shutterstock

There have been more than 220,000 coronavirus deaths in the United States, and each one represents years of potential life lost.

They are years that might otherwise have been filled with moments rich and mundane: Time spent with family and friends. Trips to the grocery store. Late-night conversations on the phone. Tearful firsts with a newborn baby.

Staggering as the 220,00 number is, it may not fully capture the true toll of the pandemic, according to a recent analysis.

Tabulating the ages of Americans known to have died of Covid-19, and tallying the number of years they might have lived had they reached a typical life expectancy, the report concluded that the virus had claimed more than 2.5 million years of potential life in the United States.

“Think of everything that a person does in a year,” said the author of the report, Stephen Elledge, a geneticist at Harvard. “Who among us would not give anything to have one more year with a parent, a spouse, a son or daughter, a close friend?”

The report, which has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, comes as 37 states continue to see sustained increases in new infections, according to a New York Times database. Twelve have been roughly flat over the past couple of weeks. Only Hawaii is seeing consistent declines. On Wednesday, at least four states broke their single-day records for new cases reported.

Just last week, scientists published a high-profile and discredited declaration arguing that businesses and schools should be quickly opened and that people “who are not vulnerable” to the virus — presumably the young and healthy — should return to “life as normal” while older Americans remain cloistered from the coronavirus.

Dr. Elledge’s analysis found that nearly half of the years lost were taken from people younger than 65.

“These are everyday people who are dying,” said Dr. Utibe Essien, a physician and health equity researcher at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who was not involved in the analysis. “They’re losing time with their kids, their grandkids, their opportunities to build their futures.” Dr. Essien was one of several experts who reviewed the study at the request of The New York Times.

Credit…James Estrin/The New York Times

For months now, the extraordinary challenges of schooling during the coronavirus pandemic have dominated life in communities large and small across the United States, yet the topic has not been at the forefront of the presidential campaign.

Communities are battling over whether and how to reopen schools closed since March. Superintendents are warning of drastic budget cuts on the horizon. Teachers’ unions are calling for standardized tests to be canceled

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medicine

The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY …

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new  Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We are pleased to congratulate Dr. Riley on his historic appointment as Chairman of NYAM’s Board of Trustees,” said Dr. Steven J. Corwin, president, and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian. “Dr. Riley is

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medicine

The New York Academy Of Medicine Welcomes New Board Chair Dr. Wayne Riley, President Of SUNY Downstate

Historic moment as a 173-year-old institution dedicated to medicine, public health, and health equity elects first Black physician as Chair of its Board of Trustees.

New York, NY, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University jointly announced Wayne J. Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, MACP, as Chair of NYAM’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Riley is the 17th president of the Brooklyn-based SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, where he also holds tenured professorships in internal medicine, health policy, and management. Dr. Riley joined the NYAM Board of Trustees in 2017.  

He is the first African American to lead the organization’s board as he succeeds James Flynn, MS, President, Deerfield Management Company LP.

With nearly 175 years of leadership in medical science, advocacy to improve medicine, public health, and disparities in healthcare, NYAM’s mission to attain health equity in pursuit of a healthier New York—and the world—has never been more vital. The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities—furthered by a 400-year legacy of systemic racism—that have created poor health outcomes for millions, many in communities of color. NYAM is responding to this public health crisis with the passion and unique know-how of its longstanding institutional expertise, as well as a commitment to addressing social justice issues to reach health equity. 

Since joining the NYAM board, Dr. Riley’s guidance and leadership have significantly impacted NYAM’s strategic plans, including its new Action Agenda for Health Equity. Fueled by the current state of health inequities, Dr. Riley’s ongoing contributions and leadership of the Board of NYAM and its partnership with the executive leadership will help lay the groundwork to improve the health and well-being of New Yorkers in the years to come. 

“Dr. Riley’s leadership of the NYAM’s Board of Trustees will enhance and enrich NYAM’s perspectives in our pursuit of disrupting common thinking patterns, changing systems and bolstering the influence of our work to result in meaningful change,” said NYAM President Dr. Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS. “We are fortunate to benefit from his wealth of experience as a top physician, educator, and administrator, and I can think of no one better to head our Board as we continue to pursue our vision of a world where everyone has the opportunity to live a healthy life.”

“I am honored to assume the role of Chairman of the Board of The New York Academy of Medicine,” said Dr. Riley. “At this critical time in New York and our nation, while we deal with a global pandemic, unjustifiable and worrisome distrust of medicine and science, social justice matters, systemic racism, and persistent health disparities—all of which significantly impact communities of color—understanding the intersectionality of where these variables meet begs for viable solutions, and systematic, positive outcomes. NYAM’s voice, advocacy, and leadership remain critically important in affecting positive change, and I look forward to the work we will continue to engage in as a Board and an organization.”

 “We

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health

Crain’s New York Business Names VirtualHealth a Best Place to Work in New York City

VirtualHealth adds accolades to growing list of 2020 accomplishments recognizing its stand-out leadership and company culture

VirtualHealth, provider of HELIOS, the leading SaaS care management platform, has been named as one of the 2020 “Best Places to Work in New York City” by Crain’s New York Business. This is the first time that VirtualHealth has been recognized as a top employer by Crain’s, a trusted voice in the New York business community.

“From closing the office, to working remotely, to maintaining productivity and supporting our clients in their care of millions of Americans who are underserved, underprivileged, and elderly, every member of the VirtualHealth team has risen to new heights over the past year,” said Adam Sabloff, CEO of VirtualHealth. “2020 has tested our world, our country, and our city, but our industry is resilient and has mobilized in countless ways to support one another. We look forward to continuing to push the healthcare industry forward and providing the tools that power the proactive care movement.”

VirtualHealth is also being honored as one of the healthcare industry’s top workplaces. Modern Healthcare has ranked the company No. 44 on its annual list of the Best Places to Work in Healthcare. This award program identifies and recognizes outstanding employers from providers to suppliers nationwide.

VirtualHealth is a leader in healthcare management technology, and its employees work tirelessly to provide innovative solutions for the country’s leading health plans and healthcare organizations. VirtualHealth pivoted to remote work early in the pandemic to keep employees safe and continues to maintain a positive and connected remote work environment through engagement initiatives, training programs, and inspirational gifts. Employees of VirtualHealth also benefit from unlimited paid-time-off, flexible schedules, ongoing education to encourage professional growth, and more.

Crain’s New York Business partnered with independent research firm Best Companies Group to create this year’s list. More than 20,000 employees across the five boroughs were given a survey to account for the rankings. The complete list of this year’s winners, in alphabetical order, is available here.

Crain’s New York Business will also host a virtual event on December 3 to celebrate the 2020 Best Places to Work, and will announce the rankings in the small, mid-size and large company size categories, based on the number of New York-area employees.

Visit https://www.virtualhealth.com for more information about VirtualHealth. To explore open positions at VirtualHealth, click here.

About VirtualHealth

HELIOS by VirtualHealth is the first comprehensive care management platform purpose-built to power the entire ecosystem of value-based care. Utilized by some of the most innovative health plans in the country to manage millions of members, HELIOS streamlines person-centered care with intelligent case and disease management workflows, unmatched data integration, broad-spectrum collaboration, patient engagement, and configurable analytics and reporting. Named one of the fastest-growing companies in North America by Deloitte in 2018 and 2019, VirtualHealth empowers healthcare organizations to achieve enhanced outcomes, while maximizing efficiency, improving transparency, and lowering costs. For more information, visit www.virtualhealth.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201020005456/en/

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