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Baylor Scott & White Health announces new affiliations with Baylor College of Medicine and Texas A&M University to further expand the pipeline of exceptional clinical talent for Texas

Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit health system in the state of Texas, today announced two separate academic affiliations: a new affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine and an expanded affiliation with its long-time partner Texas A&M University. Both alliances are aimed at training future clinicians and developing programs that advance high-quality care and healthcare innovation. 

“We believe these long-term partnerships will ensure that our patients will have access to breakthrough medical discoveries and cutting-edge treatments from world-class physicians for generations to come,” said Peter J. McCanna, president, Baylor Scott & White.  

Baylor Scott & White offers the full continuum of care, from primary to award-winning specialty care, through an integrated care delivery network of 52 hospitals and more than 1,100 access points including flagship academic medical centers in Dallas and Temple. Baylor Scott & White extends investigational expertise across more than 50 medical specialties through Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, which provides the business and regulatory infrastructure to accelerate medical breakthroughs and innovative new treatment models. Baylor Scott & White Research Institute oversees nearly 2,000 active trials each year. 

Establishing a new Baylor College of Medicine regional medical school campus in Temple 

Baylor Scott & White and Baylor College of Medicine today announce a new affiliation to enhance the organizations’ collective impact on the statewide effort to train more students to become physicians.  

Additionally, the affiliation will allow for opportunities for expanded research and program development, with the ultimate goal of improving health and healthcare for Texans. 

The new 20-year relationship will be anchored by the development of a progressive four-year regional medical school campus in Temple, Texas, where Baylor College of Medicine will offer a curriculum highlighted by an approach that fully integrates health system and university resources to deliver adaptive and personalized medical education.  

“This is a great opportunity to expand Baylor College of Medicine’s outstanding medical education programs to a regional medical school campus,” said Dr. Paul Klotman, president, CEO and executive dean of Baylor College of Medicine. “We are looking forward to being in Temple.”  

Through a holistic recruiting process, Baylor College of Medicine focuses on recruiting a diverse class of students who are from and reflective of the communities that Baylor Scott & White serves. An inaugural class of 40 medical students is anticipated to begin training in Fall 2023. The campus will increase by 40 students a year over four years. The medical school is excited to welcome 160 more students to experience the caliber of education offered by Baylor College of Medicine. 

Baylor College of Medicine will strive to maintain a high percentage of Texas residents in the medical school. The goal of the new affiliation is to further expand the physician workforce pipeline for Texas with graduates having the opportunity to serve as future leaders in communities and providing outstanding clinical care for the people of Texas.  

The regional medical school campus in Temple will be overseen by the Baylor College of Medicine School of Medicine Dean, and

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Baylor Scott & White teams with Baylor College of Medicine on new med school campus in Temple

Two of Texas’ leading health care players are teaming up to create a new medical school campus to reduce the state’s physician shortage and foster more health care innovation.

Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest nonprofit hospital system in Texas, said it’s collaborating with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, the state’s top-ranked medical school. Their 20-year agreement will be anchored by a regional medical school campus in Temple, about a two-hour drive south of Dallas.

In 2023, an inaugural class of 40 medical students is expected to begin training in Temple, and over four years, enrollment is projected to total 160.

The organizations will rely on tuition and donations for expenses, not state funding — with Dallas-based Baylor Scott & White covering any financial shortfalls, said Peter McCanna, president of the hospital company.

“We really believe this is crucially important for our patients and for Texas,” McCanna said in an interview. “Having top educators and top students and residents in the mix makes for the best medical care for our patients.”

Four years ago, the two announced a research alliance that included working together on clinical trials. They share a common heritage and the school started in Dallas in 1900. The school moved to Houston in 1943 and separated from Baylor University in 1969 to become independent.

“This is a great opportunity to expand Baylor College of Medicine’s outstanding medical education programs to a regional medical school campus,” Dr. Paul Klotman, CEO of the school, said in a statement. “We are looking forward to being in Temple.”

“This affiliation is good for Texans in a number of ways,” said Jim Hinton, CEO of the health system. “It will not only help us develop and keep more clinicians in a state that projects a continued physician shortage, it makes groundbreaking research from the country’s top institutions more available to the millions of Texans we serve each year.”

Baylor Scott & White already has a regional medical school campus in Temple with Texas A&M University. That will be relocating to Dallas as part of the moves announced on Tuesday.

Over 200 medical students from Texas A&M currently train at BS&W facilities, the company said. That number will grow to over 300 medical students over the next three years. A majority of those students will train in Dallas, making it the school’s largest regional medical campus, officials said.

The two also may develop a new physician assistant program and increase educational opportunities in nursing and pharmacy in Bryan-College Station.

“This collaboration leverages our strengths to develop an innovative health care workforce to deliver the next generation of high-value care,” John Sharp, chancellor of the Texas A&M University System, said in a statement. “I am excited to see this relationship grow and continue to flourish.”

Baylor, whose revenue topped $10 billion last year, operates 52 hospitals, 26 surgery centers and 557 specialty care clinics. It has about 49,000 employees, including joint ventures, and does over 7.5 million patient encounters a year.

The

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Foo Fighters’ ‘Shame Shame’ Video Is Fiery In Black And White

In recent weeks, Foo Fighters have been cryptically teasing a new album, but things got more clear last weekend when they performed on Saturday Night Live, premiered “Shame Shame,” and formally announced Medicine At Midnight. The studio version of the single was released after the SNL performance, and now they have debuted a new visual for the song. The black-and-white clip features the burning coffin with which fans became familiar through the advance teasers.

Back in February (about a year ahead of the album’s now-announced release date), Grohl said that the band had finished recording the record, saying, “We just finished making a record. Some of those songs, the best ones happen in 45 minutes. Then there’s other songs — there’s a riff on the new record I’ve been working on for 25 years. The first time I demoed it was in my basement in Seattle.” He also previously compared it to David Bowie, saying, “To me, it’s like our David Bowie’s Let’s Dance record. That’s what we wanted to make, ’cause we were like, ‘Yeah, let’s make this really up, fun record!’”

This isn’t the only new music Dave Grohl has in the pipeline, as he and his 10-year-old drum battle partner are working on a song together.

Watch the “Shame Shame” video above.

Medicine At Midnight is out 2/5/2021 via Roswell/RCA. Pre-order it here.

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‘Deadly’ Phase of Pandemic Looms, White House Advisor Birx Warns | Health News

By Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The pandemic is entering a new and “deadly” phase and the United States needs to adopt a more aggressive approach to curbing the spread of COVID-19, White House coronavirus response coordinator warned Monday.

The warning, expressed by Dr. Deborah Birx in a private memo to White House officials, was a direct contradiction to President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the pandemic is “rounding the corner,” the Washington Post reported.

Birx’s memo painted a grim picture: “Cases are rapidly rising in nearly 30 percent of all USA counties, the highest number of county hotspots we have seen with this pandemic,” it said. “Half of the United States is in the red or orange zone for cases despite flat or declining testing.”

The memo went further, and suggested that Trump and his advisers were spending too much time focusing on preventing lockdowns and not enough time on controlling the virus.

“We are entering the most concerning and most deadly phase of this pandemic,” Birx wrote. “This is not about lockdowns — it hasn’t been about lockdowns since March or April. It’s about an aggressive balanced approach that is not being implemented.”

Until now, Birx has not criticized Trump or his administration in public, the Post reported. But her sharp critique mirrors a growing dread among government scientists and public health experts that the worst of the pandemic is yet to come.

Birx now contradicts Trump on numerous points, the Post reported:

–While he holds large campaign rallies, she warns against them.

–While he blames rising cases on more testing, Birx says testing is “flat or declining” in many areas where cases are rising.

–While he says the country is “rounding the turn,” Birx notes the country is entering its most dangerous period yet and will see more than 100,000 new cases a day this week.

The latest case counts suggest Birx is right: More than 9.2 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, and the seven-day average of new daily coronavirus infections in the United States hit a new high of 81,740 in Sunday, the Post reported.

Meanwhile, hospitals are scrambling to find enough nursing help — especially in rural areas and at small hospitals, the Associated Press reported.

Nurses are being trained in fields where they have limited experience, hospitals are scaling back other medical services, and health systems are turning to short-term travel nurses to help fill the gaps, the AP reported.

Adding to the strain, experienced nurses are “burned out with this whole [pandemic]” and some are quitting, said Kevin Fitzpatrick, an emergency room nurse at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Mich., where several left just in the past month to work in hospice or home care or at outpatient clinics.

States say they don’t have enough money to distribute a COVID vaccine

Meanwhile, state health officials say they are frustrated about a lack of financial support from the federal government as they

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‘We are entering the most concerning and most deadly phase of this pandemic,’ Birx wrote in a White House memo.

Dr. Deborah L. Birx, who has carefully straddled the line between science and politics as she helps lead the Trump administration’s coronavirus response, delivered a stark private warning on Monday, telling White House officials that the pandemic is entering a new and “deadly phase” that demands a more aggressive approach.

The warning — sent in a private memo to White House officials as the nation — amounted to a direct contradiction of President Trump’s repeated false assertions that the pandemic is “rounding the corner.” In it, Dr. Birx suggested Mr. Trump and his advisers were spending too much time focusing on lockdowns, and not enough on controlling the virus.

“We are entering the most concerning and most deadly phase of this pandemic,” Dr. Birx wrote, adding, “This is not about lockdowns — It hasn’t been about lockdowns since March or April. It’s about an aggressive balanced approach that is not being implemented.”

The report warned against the type of rallies that Mr. Trump has been holding. It also predicted that the United States would continue to see days when the number of new cases exceeded 100,000. Its existence was first reported by The Washington Post; a top White House official who has seen it confirmed its contents.

The blunt message was a striking one for Dr. Birx, who at least in public has resisted disagreeing with Mr. Trump. But with cases soaring around the country, and hospital intensive care units starting to fill up, government scientists and public health experts are growing increasingly concerned that the worst of the pandemic is yet to come.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, has also been offering unusually blunt assessments, and is once again in Mr. Trump’s cross hairs as a result. At a campaign rally in Miami early Monday morning, Mr. Trump attacked the news media for its emphasis on the virus, which prompted the crowd to chant, “Fire Fauci! Fire Fauci!”

To that, the president responded: “Don’t tell anybody, but let me wait until a little bit after the election. I appreciate the advice.” What the president neglected to mention is that Dr. Fauci has Civil Service protections, and it would be extremely difficult for Mr. Trump to remove him.

Unlike Dr. Fauci, who has clashed repeatedly with the White House, Dr. Birx has taken a more measured approach, taking care never to openly criticize the president or his administration.

Dr. Birx was named the coronavirus response coordinator in March. The job has required her to manage the work of the White House coronavirus task force, tracking and orchestrating the government’s effort to contain the outbreak. In the early days of the pandemic, she projected a calm, authoritative presence — and a steady counterpoint to the mixed messages from Mr. Trump.

More recently, though, she has been eclipsed by Dr. Scott W. Atlas, Mr. Trump’s new pandemic adviser, who advocates allowing the virus to spread naturally among young people, while the government focuses its efforts on protecting

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Fred Hutch researchers uncover new genetic details of White House COVID-19 outbreak

Since it was revealed in early October, details about President Trump’s COVID-19 infection have been in short supply, including the likely source of his exposure and when he was tested.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Judge Amy Coney Barrett delivers remarks after President Donald Trump announces her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sept. 26, 2020, in the Rose Garden of the White House. The event is believed to be responsible for the spread of COVID-19 among some attendees. (Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks, Public Domain )


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Judge Amy Coney Barrett delivers remarks after President Donald Trump announces her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sept. 26, 2020, in the Rose Garden of the White House. The event is believed to be responsible for the spread of COVID-19 among some attendees. (Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks, Public Domain )

New research from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle gives a glimpse into the spread of the disease among America’s first family and White House staff and guests.

Two journalists who directly interacted with White House officials at the end of September — but were not in each other’s company — contracted variations of the virus that were “highly genetically similar.” The genetic code from the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, that infected the journalists contained five unique mutations and were distinct from the genomes of more than 160,000 publicly available virus sequences.

The scientists said this particular lineage of the virus was first documented in the U.S. in April or May, but its exact spread from there was unclear.

Shortly after Trump was infected, Anthony S. Fauci — the nation’s top infectious-disease expert — said that the White House had been the site of a so-called super spreader event when it hosted a Rose Garden reception for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, now a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Photos show that many in attendance did not wear masks. At least 50 COVID-19 cases have been connected to an outbreak associated with the White House, according to the researchers.

Trump Administration officials at the time of the outbreak made little effort to do contact tracing to potentially help contain the spread — a decision that drew criticism from some health experts.

When it comes to the source of the White House infections, “it’s sort of an unknowable question, where it entered the environment,” said White House deputy press secretary Brian Morgenstern, in a press conference on Oct. 7.

The Fred Hutch-led research calls that assertion into question. While it’s too late to use the information to limit spread from the initial event, genomic sequencing could provide additional insights into the path of transmission if more samples were tested. It could also help build a more complete picture of the outbreak’s spread by analyzing infections that occur weeks or months following the White House event.



chart: Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have created a family tree for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and identified the form associated with the White House outbreak. (Fred Hutch Image)


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Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have created a family tree for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and identified the form associated with the White House

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Fauci rips White House coronavirus approach

Dr. Anthony FauciAnthony FauciRegeneron halts trial of COVID-19 antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients The Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Facebook – Pollsters stir debate over Trump numbers Donald Trump Jr. claims US coronavirus death rate at ‘almost nothing’ MORE, the nation’s leading disease expert, took aim at the White House’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak as the country has seen a spike in cases as it approaches winter, saying “it’s not a good situation.”

“We’re in for a whole lot of hurt. It’s not a good situation,” Fauci, a member of the White House coronavirus task force, told The Washington Post in an interview this weekend. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said “all the stars are aligned in the wrong place as you go into the fall and winter season, with people congregating at home indoors.”

“You could not possibly be positioned more poorly,” he continued.

In a broad interview with the paper, Fauci warned of the country reaching a point where it could see over 100,000 coronavirus cases recorded daily if it does not reverse course quickly when it comes to public health practices. His comments came shortly after the country recorded a surge in COVID-19 infections last week, as multiple states have been reporting record number of cases in recent weeks. 

Fauci said in the interview that Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenPoll: Trump leads Biden by 7 points in Iowa Biden campaign cancels event in Texas after pro-Trump cars surrounded its bus Obama shooting three pointer while campaigning for Biden goes viral MORE’s campaign “is taking it seriously from a public health perspective,” while President TrumpDonald John TrumpPoll: Trump leads Biden by 7 points in Iowa Biden campaign cancels event in Texas after pro-Trump cars surrounded its bus Obama shooting three pointer while campaigning for Biden goes viral MORE is “looking at it from a different perspective” by focusing on “the economy and reopening the country.”

He also said that the coronavirus task force has been having fewer meetings, despite rising cases in the country and that “the public health aspect of the task force has diminished greatly.”

Fauci told the paper that the president not as accessible to him and White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah BirxDeborah BirxThe Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Facebook – Pollsters stir debate over Trump numbers The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – Trump, Biden set for weekend swing state sprint Kushner told Woodward in April Trump was ‘getting the country back from the doctors’ MORE as he once was. Fauci said the last time he and the president spoke was around the start of October. 

“The last time I spoke to the president was not about any policy; it was when he was recovering in Walter Reed, he called me up,” Fauci told the paper.

“All of a sudden, they didn’t like what the message was because it wasn’t what they wanted to

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White House unleashes on Fauci after criticism of Atlas and Trump’s pandemic response

The White House on Saturday unleashed on Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, following his comments to the Washington Post that criticized the Trump administration’s response to the pandemic, including Dr. Scott Atlas, who the President has relied on for advice on handling the coronavirus.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 07: Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens to U.S. President Donald Trump speak to reporters following a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on April 7, 2020 in Washington, DC. The president today removed the independent chairman of a committee tasked with overseeing the roll out of the $2 trillion coronavirus bailout package. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 07: Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens to U.S. President Donald Trump speak to reporters following a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on April 7, 2020 in Washington, DC. The president today removed the independent chairman of a committee tasked with overseeing the roll out of the $2 trillion coronavirus bailout package. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

“It’s unacceptable and breaking with all norms for Dr. Fauci, a senior member of the President’s Coronavirus Taskforce and someone who has praised President (Donald) Trump’s actions throughout this pandemic, to choose three days before an election to play politics,” White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said in a statement to CNN on Saturday evening.

Deere took issue with Fauci’s comments where the doctor seemingly praises Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s campaign. Fauci told the Post that the Democratic nominee’s campaign “is taking it seriously from a public health perspective.” While Trump, Fauci said, is “looking at it from a different perspective.” He said that perspective was “the economy and reopening the country,” according to the Post.

“As a member of the Task Force, Dr. Fauci has a duty to express concerns or push for a change in strategy, but he’s not done that, instead choosing to criticize the President in the media and make his political leanings known by praising the President’s opponent— exactly what the American people have come to expect from The Swamp,” Deere said.

Fauci, a leading member of the government’s coronavirus response, said the United States needed to make an “abrupt change” in public health practices and behaviors, according to the Post. He said the country could surpass 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day and predicted rising deaths in the coming weeks.

“Dr. Fauci knows that the risks today are dramatically lower than they were only a few months ago with mortality rates falling over 80%. The Trump Administration, through the work of the Task Force, continues to surge testing, PPE, personnel, and capacity to protect the vulnerable, help schools reopen, and respond to conditions on the ground,” Deere said.

In Friday’s interview with the Post, Fauci also criticized Atlas, a neuroradiologist and Trump’s hand-picked coronavirus adviser, for his lack of expertise.

“I have real problems with that guy,” Fauci said. “He’s a smart guy who’s talking about things that I believe he doesn’t have any real insight or knowledge or experience in. He keeps talking about things that when you dissect it out and parse it out, it doesn’t make any sense.”

Atlas responded to Fauci on Twitter, tweeting on Saturday night:

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Dr. Anthony Fauci unleashes on White House coronavirus approach days before election

As President Donald Trump fights his way through the final days of the presidential campaign denying the pandemic — by lashing out at doctors, disputing science and slashing the press for highlighting rising coronavirus case counts — the long-running rift between the White House and Dr. Anthony Fauci burst into the open Saturday night.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump, joined by members of the Coronavirus Task Force, speaks as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

For months as Trump undercut his own medical experts, sidelined scientists and refused to take basic steps to control the virus while mocking former Vice President Joe Biden for wearing a mask, the nation’s top infectious disease specialist held his tongue and took the President’s attacks in stride as he continued to plead with the American people to socially distance and wear masks.

But Fauci’s restraint appeared to have evaporated in a Washington Post interview that was published Saturday night, in which he called out the White House for allowing its strategy for fighting the virus to be shaped in part by a neuroradiologist with no training in the field of infectious disease and said he appreciated chief of staff Mark Meadows’ honesty when he admitted to CNN’s Jake Tapper during a recent interview that the administration has given up controlling the spread of the virus.

At a time when Trump is downplaying the rising cases in the vast majority of states, dangerously holding huge rallies with few masks and no social distancing, and lodging the false and outlandish claim that doctors are exaggerating the number of Covid deaths for profit, Fauci told the Post that the nation is “in for a whole lot of hurt.”

“All the stars are aligned in the wrong place” as the country heads indoors in colder weather, Fauci told the newspaper in an interview late Friday — a day when the US set a global record for the most daily cases and the nation surpassed 229,000 deaths. “You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

View Trump and Biden head-to-head polling

Fauci, who is widely trusted by the public after a lengthy career serving under six presidents from both parties, said Meadows was being candid in the interview last weekend where he told Tapper it was not possible to control the virus. Fauci has adopted the polar opposite strategy by repeatedly telling Americans that they can change the trajectory of the virus and save lives if they adhere to mask use, social distancing protocols and other safety precautions.

“I tip my hat to him for admitting the strategy,” Fauci told the Post of Meadows’

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White House to Require Insurers to Post Negotiated Prices for Medical Care

Private insurers must publish the prices they have negotiated with providers under a Trump administration rule aimed at lowering health-care spending by giving consumers more information about their out-of-pocket charges.

The rule completed Thursday calls for gradually increasing the requirements. Private insurers will have to post the negotiated prices for 500 “shoppable” services in 2023, with the mandate extended to all services by 2024.

The action comes in the final days of President Trump’s re-election campaign and after Democratic challenger Joe Biden has criticized him for backing a lawsuit to invalidate the Affordable Care Act, which could result in about 20 million Americans losing health coverage.

With health care among the top issues for voters, the president has made price transparency a key part of his message on the subject. His administration also issued a rule Wednesday to ensure seniors on Medicare get any possible coronavirus vaccine administered at no cost.

Insurers and hospitals have criticized the White House initiatives as too expensive and burdensome and of little use to consumers they say are unlikely to shop around based on negotiated rates. A federal judge in June ruled against hospitals that had sued to block a similar rule compelling them to negotiate their rates with insurers. The case is now with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

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