wearing

health

Six NHS staff contract Covid after car sharing without wearing masks

Six NHS hospital staff have been sent home after falling ill with Covid-19 when they breached government rules by not wearing a mask when sharing lifts to and from work.



graphical user interface, application: Photograph: Alicia Canter/The Guardian


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Alicia Canter/The Guardian

The six were told not to come into work by the University Hospitals of North Midlands trust, which is already having to deliver services with almost 600 personnel off work because of the illness.

Staff at the trust, which runs the Royal Stoke and Stafford County hospitals, were told about the incident in an email last week from Dr John Oxtoby, the trust’s medical director. The trust refused to say what roles the six perform at what is one of the NHS’s biggest, or at which hospital they work.

Their actions are a clear breach of the government’s guidance on the measures passengers should take to ensure they are not spreading or being exposed to coronavirus if they are travelling with people who are not in their household or support bubble.

It states that people travelling should “ask the driver and passengers to wear a face covering” as well as opening windows to ensure ventilation, cleaning vehicles in between journeys and sharing the car with the same people on each trip.

In his email to staff on 28 October, Oxtoby said: “It is essential that all staff who are car sharing wear a mask for the full journey to and from work.

“This week we had to send six members of staff home as they did not wear masks and have now developed Covid-19 symptoms.”

He also reminded staff to always wear a visor in clinical areas where doing so is advised, even if a patient has tested negative. The trust refused to say if any staff had recently flouted that rule.

On Tuesday this week, 987 of the trust’s 11,500 staff were off sick, of whom 583 either had Covid-19 or were isolating because someone in their household was displaying symptoms. Those 583 represented a sharp increase on the 421 staff who were off sick due to Covid-19 when Oxtoby sent his email on 28 October – a 39% rise in just six days.

Asked about the behaviour of the six staff, Oxtoby said that trust staff, like everyone in the NHS, had been working hard throughout the pandemic. But, he added: “We all obviously have a responsibility to observe national guidance and our staff are regularly kept up to date with the latest advice as it becomes available.

“Wearing a face mask and eye protection alongside hand washing and social distancing are all important measures of reducing the spread of Covid-19 in our hospitals and to keep our patients and communities safe.”

Lindsay Meeks, the Royal College of Nursing’s West Midlands regional director, said: “While there’s no suggestion this incident involves any of our members, we would urge all nursing staff to adhere to the Covid-19 restrictions in place in their area, and to any guidelines put in place

Read More
health

Trump mocks Fox News host Laura Ingraham for wearing mask at rally

The president has often been critical of his opponents for wearing masks during the coronavirus pandemic

President Donald Trump has been critical of his opponents for wearing masks during the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, he turned that criticism on to one of his biggest supporters: Fox News host Laura Ingraham.

Ingraham was attending Trump’s campaign rally in Waterford Township, Michigan when Trump spotted the conservative TV personality and pointed her out in the crowd. Noticing that she was wearing a protective mask, he went off-script and began drawing attention to her.

“I can’t recognize you. Is that a mask? No way,” Trump said. “Are you wearing a mask? I’ve never seen her in a mask. Look at you. Oh, she’s being very politically correct. Whoa. Whoa.”

Read More: Trump supporters say masks are harmful, would wear if Trump said so

Trump previously mocked Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for wearing a mask at their first debate earlier this month. At that same debate, his inner circle who attended opted not to wear masks while in the audience.

The president repeatedly said publicly that wearing masks shouldn’t be mandatory, despite several doctors and experts, including the nation’s top infectious disease official, Dr. Anthony Fauci, stating that wearing protective masks can decrease the risk of contracting coronavirus.

Fauci wants a national mandate for wearing masks but concedes that Trump would keep that from happening, reported Forbes.

Read More: Trump White House blocked effort to mail every US household face masks

Trump’s mocking of Ingraham stands out as she is one of his biggest sympathizers in the media. Ingraham gave an emotional statement of support to Trump on Fox News following his diagnosis of COVID-19. “We’ll take up the slack. Because you fought for us,” Ingraham said. “Do not fear for a moment. Because now we’re going to fight for you.”

Ingraham is the same Fox News host who famously coined the phrase “shut up and dribble,” after criticizing NBA superstars LeBron James and Kevin Durant for condemning the president on social media. This prompted a backlash from NBA players, including the late Kobe Bryant, who addressed it in his Oscar acceptance speech in 2018.

In 2019, James would go on to executive produce a Showtime documentary series called Shut Up and Dribble, which chronicled the history of NBA players speaking out against social and political injustice.

Have you subscribed to theGrio’s podcast “Dear Culture”? Download our newest episodes now!

TheGrio is now on Apple TV, Amazon Fire, and Roku. Download theGrio today!

The post Trump mocks Fox News host Laura Ingraham for wearing mask at rally appeared first on TheGrio.

Source Article

Read More
health

Universal Mask Wearing Could Save Some 130,000 Lives In The U.S., Study Suggests : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

Midshipmen wearing face masks stand and salute before the Navy Midshipmen play against the Houston Cougars on Saturday in Annapolis, Md. Researchers have tried to estimate how many lives would be saved by universal mask-wearing.

Patrick Smith/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Midshipmen wearing face masks stand and salute before the Navy Midshipmen play against the Houston Cougars on Saturday in Annapolis, Md. Researchers have tried to estimate how many lives would be saved by universal mask-wearing.

Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Universal mask wearing in public could greatly reduce the number of Americans who die by COVID-19 by February, a study published Friday in the journal Nature Medicine projects.

Researchers at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation made estimates based on some assumptions under different scenarios.

In what they describe as the worst-case scenario, they project that COVID-19 deaths could exceed a million between September 2020 and February 2021 if what they call “the current pattern of easing” restrictions continues in states.

In a second scenario that they think is more likely, they say 511,000 could die between September and February under the assumption that “states would once again shut down social interaction and some economic activity” for six weeks once deaths reach a certain threshold per million residents.

But in a third scenario where 95% of the population dons face coverings and social restrictions are in place, the projection is for deaths to be about 381,000 — or about 130,000 fewer than under the second scenario.

If that mask percentage changes to 85% of Americans with restrictions, it could still save some 96,000 lives, they say.

The study analyzed previous COVID-19 deaths and cases between Feb. 1 and Sept. 21. Researchers also pulled information from various surveys — including ones by Facebook and YouGov — to estimate that as of Sept. 21, only 49% of Americans reported always wearing a mask.

The study also assumed a 40% reduction in risk of COVID transmission due to a mask usage. Earlier studies estimated masks can reduce transmission by at least 30%.

Researchers also noted that changes in policies and behavior could affect outcomes and that epidemics progress in a way that is are “difficult to observe directly and at scale.”

“It is unreasonable to expect any model to do everything well, so each model makes compromises to serve a purpose, while maintaining computational tractability,” researchers wrote.

According to data from Johns Hopkins University, more than 224,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus.

Source Article

Read More
health

Wearing masks could save more than 100,000 US lives through February, new study suggests

If 95% of Americans wore masks in public, more than 100,000 lives could be saved from Covid-19 through February, a new modeling study suggests.



a person standing in front of a store: A customer wearing a face mask exits a Walgreens pharmacy in South Beach on April 14, 2020 in Miami Beach, Florida. The city of Miami Beach put in place an emergency measure requiring all customers and employees at grocery stores, restaurants and pharmacies to wear face coverings to help fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.


© Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images
A customer wearing a face mask exits a Walgreens pharmacy in South Beach on April 14, 2020 in Miami Beach, Florida. The city of Miami Beach put in place an emergency measure requiring all customers and employees at grocery stores, restaurants and pharmacies to wear face coverings to help fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.

The study — from the Covid-19 forecasting team at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation — notes that, in September, only about 49% of US residents reported that they “always” wear a mask in public.

If mask-wearing is 49% through February and states continue with removing social distancing mandates, the Covid-19 death toll across the United States could reach about 1 million deaths by February 28, according to the study, published in the journal Nature Medicine on Friday.

Yet under the assumption that states shut down when their daily death rate exceeds 8 deaths per 1 million people in the population but mask-wearing doesn’t change, the study’s model projections forecast the death toll could reach 511,373 deaths by February 28.

The scenario that 95% of people in each state wear masks — in addition to states reinstating social distancing mandates if their daily death rates exceed 8 deaths per 1 million people — resulted in the lowest death toll projection, with 381,798 deaths by February 28, according to the study.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on Covid-19 cases and deaths in the United States from February 1 through September 21. That analysis — along with other factors, such as pneumonia seasonality, testing rates and mask use — helped inform model projections for the course of the pandemic through February 28.

The study had some limitations, including that the findings are only forecast projections from models and not definitive about what the future holds — and mask wearing tends to fluctuate, so the 49% figure used in the study appears to now be outdated.

IHME Director Dr. Chris Murray also emphasized during a virtual press briefing on Friday that the institute’s weekly modeling projections provide more updated data than what is provided in the study. However, the study still helps offer insight into how mask-wearing can make a difference.

“We think the key point here is that there’s a huge winter surge coming and our models have been showing that for many months,” Murray said on Friday.

“You can see in the paper what universal masks can do and they blunt quite a bit of the surge or delay it,” he said. “I think it’s very difficult at the point where we are in the US — where there’s so much community transmission of the virus — to prevent some fall winter surge, but we can certainly make it much smaller.”

Murray said that “the long-range view” provided in the study “is

Read More
health

Wearing masks could save more than 100,000 lives in the next few months: new study

The U.S. could avoid a devastating number of additional COVID-19 deaths if more Americans wear masks to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, a new analysis published in Nature Medicine projects. 

Researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) estimate in an analysis published Friday that the coronavirus death toll in the U.S. could surpass more than half a million by March without universal mask-wearing — defined as 95 percent of the population wearing face coverings in public. The total death count would hit the grim milestone even if physical distancing mandates remained in place in every state. 


Our country is in a historic fight against the Coronavirus. Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


With universal mask-wearing, however, nearly 130,000 lives could be saved. The analysis also estimates more than 95,000 lives could be spared if mask compliance was only at 85 percent. Researchers analyzed the number of cases, testing rates, mask use and cellphone data from the first confirmed case in each state through Sept. 21, then estimated the death toll until March 2021 for each state with or without social distancing and mask use. 

“The potential life-saving benefit of increasing mask use in the coming fall and winter cannot be overstated. It is likely that US residents will need to choose between higher levels of mask use or risk the frequent redeployment of more stringent and economically damaging [social distancing mandates]; or, in the absence of either measure, face a reality of a rising death toll,” the analysis states. 

Public health officials have stressed for months the importance of mask use in slowing the spread of COVID-19 as the race for a safe and effective vaccine continues. Officials estimate a viable vaccine likely won’t be broadly available until several months into 2021. 

The projection comes as the U.S. is currently experiencing a new wave of infections heading into the colder months and flu season. The Washington Post reports the average number of COVID-19 hospitalizations has increased in at least 38 states over the last week, and 14 states have reported new highs in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. 

The U.S. has confirmed more than 8.4 million cases and more than 223,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. 


WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CORONAVIRUS RIGHT NOW

CDC ‘STRONGLY RECOMMENDS’ ALL PASSENGERS ON PLANES, TRAINS, BUSES WEAR MASKS TO SLOW SPREAD OF COVID-19

THE COMING WEEKS WILL BE ‘DARKEST OF THE ENTIRE PANDEMIC,’ INFECTIOUS DISEASES EXPERT SAYS

WISCONSIN REIMPOSES CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS AMID SURGE IN HOSPITALIZATIONS

ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE COULD GET WORSE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

PROPOSAL TO LET CORONAVIRUS SPREAD NATURALLY THROUGH US POPULATION INTERESTS WHITE HOUSE, ALARMS MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT


 

Source Article

Read More
health

Autistic individuals may have a hard time wearing a face mask. Here’s how experts help.

Health experts widely recommend wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of diseases, including COVID-19. Although there are reports of people who defy mask requirements, there are also people who may be struggling with face masks for physical reasons. Adults and children on the autism spectrum may have difficulty wearing masks.

People with autism may have sensory issues that can either be hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, meaning overactive and underactive, respectively. Face masks can pose a problem for people with hypersensitivity because they may be unable to tolerate having something on their face or the material of the mask itself activates the touch senses to a point that is intolerable.

This could potentially lead to complications or confrontations in public spaces if masks are required. There are reports of families going shopping and who were asked to leave the store, a special needs student not being able to attend classes and a mother and a 5 year old were taken off a flight because of masks.

Changing America spoke to experts at Firefly Autism, a nonprofit that provides services to adults and children with autism in Colorado. “The very first thing to always remember when we’re talking about individuals with autism is every single person is completely different,” says Amanda Kelly, who is the Home-Based Programs Director at Firefly Autism. “It’s very hard to say broadly one type of mask is better than another because everybody is entirely individual and completely different.”


BREAKING NEWS ON THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

CDC ‘STRONGLY RECOMMENDS’ ALL PASSENGERS ON PLANES, TRAINS, BUSES WEAR MASKS TO SLOW SPREAD OF COVID-19

THE COMING WEEKS WILL BE ‘DARKEST OF THE ENTIRE PANDEMIC,’ INFECTIOUS DISEASES EXPERT SAYS

WISCONSIN REIMPOSES CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS AMID SURGE IN HOSPITALIZATIONS

ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE COULD GET WORSE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

PROPOSAL TO LET CORONAVIRUS SPREAD NATURALLY THROUGH US POPULATION INTERESTS WHITE HOUSE, ALARMS MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT


An initial assessment could help understand what part of wearing a mask is difficult and why. It would also help set a baseline. For example, you can determine if the person can tolerate touching a mask, putting it on and wearing it for a few seconds.

A parent could introduce masks of varying styles and materials and see what the child chooses. Then, they could practice wearing the mask for short intervals. “We always want to make sure that we’re being very very clear with our expectations and explaining everything ahead of time,” says Kelly.

“Then the idea really is to just try and very strategically build tolerance,” says Kelly. “It might be very very small increments of time the person will tolerate having the mask on.” She suggests giving positive reinforcement along the way. Sesame Street made a video for children with autism to help them practice wearing a mask.

After tolerance has been built up, then you can begin practicing. For example, you can take a short trip to a public space with low stakes, like going to a drive through to get an ice cream. Eventually, they

Read More
health

New Trump ad features multiple clips of president wearing mask

A new political advertisement for President TrumpDonald John TrumpMichigan court overturns absentee ballot extension Trump jokes he’ll ‘find a way’ to fire Gov. DeSantis if he loses Florida Biden hits Trump’s response to attempted kidnapping of Michigan governor: ‘What the hell is wrong with this guy?’ MORE includes several video clips of him wearing a mask while a narrator praises his administration’s coronavirus response. 

Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump jokes he’ll ‘find a way’ to fire Gov. DeSantis if he loses Florida Biden hits Trump’s response to attempted kidnapping of Michigan governor: ‘What the hell is wrong with this guy?’ Trump on if Biden wins: ‘Maybe I’ll have to leave the country’ MORE has no real plan to defeat the coronavirus. Just criticize, complain and surrender,” the television spot begins, according to advertising tracker AdMo. “When President Trump shut down traveled to China, Biden attacked him.” 

The ad then pivots, showing several short videos of Trump walking through various medical facilities, wearing a mask, with a team of doctors and aides at his side. 

“President Trump is leading attacking the virus head on, developing a vaccine in record time,” the narrator declares. “Rebuilding our economy under President Trump Way will be careful, but resolute.” 

Trump, who initially downplayed the efficacy on masks, was diagnosed with coronavirus earlier this month and has since recovered, White House doctors say. 

The president sparked backlash when he removed a mask he was wearing as he left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was receiving treatment for symptoms related to the virus, before walking into the White House. 

Leading U.S. health officials agree mask wearing and social distancing are the two most effective ways to slow the spread of the coronavirus. 

“These face masks are the most important and powerful public health tool we have,” Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told Congress earlier this year. “And I will continue to appeal to all individuals in this country to embrace these face coverings. If we did it eight, 10, 12 weeks, we’d bring this pandemic under control. We have clear scientific evidence they work and they are our best defense.” 

Trump has broken with the CDC and members of his own coronavirus task force fighting the pandemic on several occasions.

At the same time, he has also sought to capitalize on the public’s trust in the word of the nation’s leading scientists; a Trump campaign ad released last week showed Anthony FauciAnthony FauciKey coronavirus model predicts nearly 80 percent rise in deaths by February The Hill’s Morning Report – Sponsored by Facebook – Trump combative, Biden earnest during distanced TV duel Health experts say ‘herd immunity’ strategy would kill thousands MORE, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, saying “nobody could have done more” to control the virus in America than Trump.

Fauci later pushed back on that ad, saying he felt the Trump campaign was “harassing” him.

Trump has also mocked Democratic presidential

Read More