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Samsung Watch Black Friday Deals 2020: Best Early Samsung Galaxy Smartwatches & Fitness Trackers Sales Ranked by Retail Fuse

BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Early Black Friday Samsung Watch deals are underway. Find the best savings on 40mm, 42mm & 46mm Samsung Galaxy Watch models. Links to the top deals are listed below.

Best Samsung Galaxy Watch Deals:

  • Save up to 36% on Samsung Galaxy smartwatches & fitness trackers at Walmart – check for live prices on top-rated Samsung watches with GPS and Bluetooth like the Samsung Galaxy smartwatch and Gear S3 Frontier
  • Save up to 68% on Samsung Galaxy Watches at Dell.com – check the link for the latest deals on the Samsung Galaxy Watch 3, Galaxy Watch Active & more
  • Save with multiple offers on Samsung Galaxy smartwatches at Verizon.com – check out the latest savings on Galaxy Watch3 & Active2
  • Save up to $200 off Samsung Galaxy smartwatches at AT&T.com – Get $200 off your purchase of Galaxy Watch3 & Active2 models
  • Save up to 35% on Samsung Galaxy smartwatches at Amazon – check for prices on popular 40mm, 42mm, 46mm models with GPS and Bluetooth at Amazon
  • Save on Samsung Gear smartwatches at Amazon – click the link for the latest deals on top-rated Samsung Gear S3 Classic and S3 Frontier smartwatches
  • Save up to $120 on Samsung Galaxy Watches at Walmart – featuring the latest discounts on Galaxy Watch 2 & 3 models in 42mm, 44mm, 45mm, 46mm & more sizes
  • Save up to $150 on the Samsung Galaxy Watch3 at Verizon.com – Verizon offers different ways to save on the Galaxy Watch3, including trade-ins and significant discounts on phone and watch bundles
  • Up to $200 off Samsung Galaxy Watch 3 smartwatches at AT&T.com – Get $200 off your purchase of Galaxy Watch3 & Active2 models
  • Save up to 40% on the Samsung Galaxy Watch 3 at Walmart – check the latest deals on 41mm, 40mm, 44mm & 45mm Samsung Galaxy Watch 3
  • Save up to $130 on the Samsung Galaxy Watch Active 2 at Walmart – click the link for the latest prices on 40mm, 41mm, 44mm & 45mm Samsung Galaxy Watch 2
  • Save up to $100 on Samsung Galaxy Watch Active smartwatches at Walmart – check out the latest deals on Galaxy Active & Active 2 smartwatches in a variety of sizes (40mm, 42mm & more)
  • Save up to $150 on the Galaxy Watch Active2 at Verizon.com – get discounts with eligible phone and Samsung Galaxy Watch smartwatch bundles, trade-ins, and more
  • Save up to $62 on Samsung Galaxy Watch 3, Galaxy Watch Active & more at Dell.com – get the hottest deals on Samsung smartwatches
  • Up to $200 off Samsung Galaxy Active2 smartwatches at AT&T.com – Get $200 off your purchase of Galaxy Watch3 & Active2 models
  • Save up to 40% on Samsung Galaxy Watch Active 2 at Walmart – check the latest deals on 40mm and 44mm Galaxy Watch Active 2

Searching for more deals? Click here to access the entire range of deals at Walmart’s Black Friday sale and click here to check out Amazon’s latest Black Friday-worthy deals. Retail

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Watch These Calisthenics Athletes Ace the U.S. Army Fitness Test

Inspired by fellow YouTuber Stan Browney’s recent attempt, Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family channel threw themselves into the U.S. Army physical fitness test (PFT) for their latest challenge video. The PFT, which assesses whether a candidate’s functional fitness is sufficient to start basic training, consists of 2 minutes of pushups, 2 minutes of situps, and a 2-mile (3.2 km) run.



Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family YouTube channel tried the U.S. Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of situps, pushups, and a 2-mile run.


© YouTube
Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family YouTube channel tried the U.S. Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of situps, pushups, and a 2-mile run.



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Access exclusive muscle-building workouts with our digital membership program.

Given that bodyweight exercises fall very much in these guys’ wheelhouse, Yannick and Michael aren’t too concerned about the first few rounds of the test. They start off with the pushups, where a minimum of 42 reps is required in the allotted 2 minutes for a passing score. Each repetition must be completed with correct form: hands at shoulder width, and a 90-degree elbow angle at the lower end of the movement.

Yannick goes first and nails a perfect score with 76 pushups in 2 minutes, while Michael also gets full points, with one less rep at 75.

Following a 15-minute recovery period, they take on the next round: situps. The required form here involves a 90-degree knee angle, with somebody holding their feet, and they have to both touch the ground with their upper back and come all the way up for a rep to count. 50 reps are needed to pass, while 80 or above constitute a perfect score.

Yannick completes 88 reps (a perfect score) before collapsing back onto the mat, out of breath. “You’re making it tough for me now,” says Michael, who is up next and determines to do even better. This time, he narrowly beats Yannick, and wins with 89 reps. “I’m feeling kind of dizzy, man,” he says, telling Michael: “If you didn’t get 88, I would never have got 89.”

The third and final round of the PFT is the 2-mile run, where a minimum time of 15:54 is needed in order to pass. Yannick and Michael do this portion of the test together, and complete the run at the same time, with another perfect score: Yannick has a time of 10:53, while Michael finishes one or two seconds ahead of him.

“At the beginning it felt easy to run that hard,” says Michael. “Then I felt it… especially after those situps.”

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fitness

Watch These Calisthenics Athletes Try the U.S. Army Fitness Test

Inspired by fellow YouTuber Stan Browney’s recent attempt, Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family channel threw themselves into the U.S. Army physical fitness test (PFT) for their latest challenge video. The PFT, which assesses whether a candidate’s functional fitness is sufficient to start basic training, consists of 2 minutes of pushups, 2 minutes of situps, and a 2-mile (3.2 km) run.

Given that bodyweight exercises fall very much in these guys’ wheelhouse, Yannick and Michael aren’t too concerned about the first few rounds of the test. They start off with the pushups, where a minimum of 42 reps is required in the allotted 2 minutes for a passing score. Each repetition must be completed with correct form: hands at shoulder width, and a 90-degree elbow angle at the lower end of the movement.

Yannick goes first and nails a perfect score with 76 pushups in 2 minutes, while Michael also gets full points, with one less rep at 75.

Following a 15-minute recovery period, they take on the next round: situps. The required form here involves a 90-degree knee angle, with somebody holding their feet, and they have to both touch the ground with their upper back and come all the way up for a rep to count. 50 reps are needed to pass, while 80 or above constitute a perfect score.

Yannick completes 88 reps (a perfect score) before collapsing back onto the mat, out of breath. “You’re making it tough for me now,” says Michael, who is up next and determines to do even better. This time, he narrowly beats Yannick, and wins with 89 reps. “I’m feeling kind of dizzy, man,” he says, telling Michael: “If you didn’t get 88, I would never have got 89.”

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The third and final round of the PFT is the 2-mile run, where a minimum time of 15:54 is needed in order to pass. Yannick and Michael do this portion of the test together, and complete the run at the same time, with another perfect score: Yannick has a time of 10:53, while Michael finishes one or two seconds ahead of him.

“At the beginning it felt easy to run that hard,” says Michael. “Then I felt it… especially after those situps.”

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

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Nomad launches fitness-oriented Sport Strap for Apple Watch

Nomad has launched a new Apple Watch band titled the Sport Strap, a minimalist band that combines a sporty aesthetic with a custom Pin and Tuck Closure mechanism.

Made from compression-molded FKM fluroelastomer rubber, the Nomad Sport Strap is a soft-touch Apple Watch band design with a microtexture satin finish. The band’s design is intended to increase ventilation of the user’s wrist while also minimizing the weight, to make it as ideal as possible for fitness-focused Apple Watch users.

Channels in the bottom of the strap increase the breathability of the band, as well as minimizing sweat buildup during exercise. The material’s resistance to oils and 100% waterproof nature also makes it easier for wearers to wipe clean after an intense workouts, or from occasional spills in everyday use.

Nomad Sport Strap

Keeping the Sport Strap in place is a Pin and Tuck Closure mechanism, a custom-designed system where a pin pokes through and out from the strap, while the tail of the strap is tucked up against the wrist.

Available now, the Nomad Sport Strap for Apple Watch costs $49.95. It is offered in 44mm and 44mm versions, and is compatible with all versions of the Apple Watch.

The Sport Strap follows two months after Nomad launched the Rugged Strap, which is also produced from FKM fluroelastomer rubber and has similar oil and water resistance.

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Watch a ‘Skinny American’ Take on the Russian Army Fitness Test

YouTuber Brandon William tries a lot of fitness challenges which involve plenty of repetition over a month-long period, like doing 100 pullups every day, or practicing the One Punch Man workout. In his latest video, Brandon takes on a one-off physical challenge that is so intense it leaves him gasping for breath: the Russian Army fitness test.

This fitness test is no joke, comprising:

  • 3,000 meter run
  • 100 meter sprint
  • 10 x 10 suicides
  • pullups
  • dips
  • leg raises
  • pushups
  • bodyweight bench press
  • an actual fight

    Brandon opts out of the fighting portion of the challenge, but throws himself fully into all of the other rounds, starting with the 3,000-meter run. He’s allotted 12 minutes to complete the run, with 11 minutes generally deemed a “gold” score. “Personally I’m not a fan of running, I literally never run, so I’m not expecting the fastest to be honest,” he says. He ends up taking more than 15 minutes to run 3,000 meters, which means this first round is a total fail. “That was horrible, that was awful,” he says.

    Next up is the 100-meter sprint, where the maximum permitted time is 13 seconds. Brandon fares better this time around, but still narrowly misses a passing score, finishing his run in 14 seconds. On a second attempt, he infinitesimally improves, with a time of 13:97. “These Russians are fast,” he says.

    But the running drills aren’t over; he still has to take on the 10 x 10 suicides. He gets his first passing score here, completing all 10 in 23 seconds, which counts as a “great” time.

    Moving onto the bodyweight exercises, Brandon is a lot more confident, as this is where he feels a lot more comfortable. In the pullup round, a passing score is 20 reps, while a gold score is 28. He comfortably passes this round with 23 pullups.

    For the dips, a minimum of 30 reps is needed to pass: “This is going to be tough,” he says. Sadly, this is another fail, as Brandon only manages 23 reps before maxing out. Next up are the full leg raises, where he achieves a minimal passing score of 12 reps. “It doesn’t even hurt my core, it hurts my lats more than anything,” he says.

    In the pushup test, Brandon needs 60 reps just to pass, whereas a gold score would be 75. “That’s a lot, especially after all the pullups, running, the leg raises,” he says. To his delight, he cranks out 77 reps, smashing this round.

    This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    The final test requires him to bench press his bodyweight for a minimum of 10 reps. “I weigh 145 pounds, and I haven’t benched in the longest time, since I normally only do bodyweight workouts,” he says. “I don’t know if I’m going to pass this one.”

    Brandon is ultimately able

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    Watch a ‘Skinny American’ Get Destroyed by the Russian Army Fitness Test



    a person standing in front of a fence: For his latest fitness challenge, YouTuber Brandon William attempted the Russian Army's physical fitness test without any training and documented the process.


    © Brandon William – YouTube
    For his latest fitness challenge, YouTuber Brandon William attempted the Russian Army’s physical fitness test without any training and documented the process.

    YouTuber Brandon William tries a lot of fitness challenges which involve plenty of repetition over a month-long period, like doing 100 pullups every day, or practicing the One Punch Man workout. In his latest video, Brandon takes on a one-off physical challenge that is so intense it leaves him gasping for breath: the Russian Army fitness test.

    This fitness test is no joke, comprising:

    • 3,000 meter run
    • 100 meter sprint
    • 10 x 10 suicides
    • pullups
    • dips
    • leg raises
    • pushups
    • bodyweight bench press
    • an actual fight

    Brandon opts out of the fighting portion of the challenge, but throws himself fully into all of the other rounds, starting with the 3,000-meter run. He’s allotted 12 minutes to complete the run, with 11 minutes generally deemed a “gold” score. “Personally I’m not a fan of running, I literally never run, so I’m not expecting the fastest to be honest,” he says. He ends up taking more than 15 minutes to run 3,000 meters, which means this first round is a total fail. “That was horrible, that was awful,” he says.



    logo: Access exclusive muscle-building workouts with our digital membership program.


    © .
    Access exclusive muscle-building workouts with our digital membership program.

    Next up is the 100-meter sprint, where the maximum permitted time is 13 seconds. Brandon fares better this time around, but still narrowly misses a passing score, finishing his run in 14 seconds. On a second attempt, he infinitesimally improves, with a time of 13:97. “These Russians are fast,” he says.

    But the running drills aren’t over; he still has to take on the 10 x 10 suicides. He gets his first passing score here, completing all 10 in 23 seconds, which counts as a “great” time.

    Moving onto the bodyweight exercises, Brandon is a lot more confident, as this is where he feels a lot more comfortable. In the pullup round, a passing score is 20 reps, while a gold score is 28. He comfortably passes this round with 23 pullups.

    For the dips, a minimum of 30 reps is needed to pass: “This is going to be tough,” he says. Sadly, this is another fail, as Brandon only manages 23 reps before maxing out. Next up are the full leg raises, where he achieves a minimal passing score of 12 reps. “It doesn’t even hurt my core, it hurts my lats more than anything,” he says.

    In the pushup test, Brandon needs 60 reps just to pass, whereas a gold score would be 75. “That’s a lot, especially after all the pullups, running, the leg raises,” he says. To his delight, he cranks out 77 reps, smashing this round.

    The final test requires him to bench press his bodyweight for a minimum of 10 reps. “I weigh 145 pounds, and I haven’t benched in the longest time, since I normally only do bodyweight workouts,” he says. “I don’t know if I’m going

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    fitness

    Watch a Bodybuilder Get Wrecked Taking the VO2 Max Fitness Test

    In his latest YouTube video, British bodybuilder and CrossFit athlete Obi Vincent put his cardio fitness and aerobic endurance to the test when he took on a VO2 max workout. The VO2 max gives an indicator of a person’s fitness by measuring their energy output based on the oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced during exercise.



    British bodybuilder and CrossFit athlete Obi Vincent challenged his personal fitness and endurance in a new YouTube video by taking a VO2 max test.


    © Obi Vincent – YouTube
    British bodybuilder and CrossFit athlete Obi Vincent challenged his personal fitness and endurance in a new YouTube video by taking a VO2 max test.

    “I’ve never tested my fitness,” says Obi. “Throughout school into my twenties, I didn’t do any sports whatsoever. Lazy as anything. I did bodybuilding for years, then CrossFit for two and a half years now, and conditioning. I think if I’d done this two years ago, it would have been a lot worse, trust me. So this is a good lesson. I almost avoided doing any fitness test because I was more scared of what it would look like.”

    After 12 minutes (and the equivalent of 3.6 miles) on the assault bike, Obi’s VO2 output is 57

    milliliters per minute per kilo. “I should not have done this on the assault bike,” says Obi, breathless from the workout. “That was a bad idea.”

    Performance nutritionist Luke points out that the easiest way to up your VO2 max is to lose some weight, which for the stacked Obi would mean losing muscle mass. However, he is already leaner at 242 pounds than he was previously, when he weighed in at 253 pounds, and likes his physique the way it is now, so he’s reluctant to get any smaller.

    In addition to highlighting areas of his own personal fitness that he wants to work on, Obi adds that he has learned a lot from Luke in terms of fuelling his body with the right energy sources for workouts. “I’m actually really disappointed with my score… It’ll be interesting to go and start applying some of the things I’ve learned, and see how I get on and do a retest.”

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    FitLife Watch Review – All-in-One Smartwatch and Fitness Tracker

    New York, NY ( TS Newswire ) — 21 Oct 2020

    Watches were meant to tell us the time, but how can a watch be left behind with the advancement in technology? Now, as you know, watches have become smart and can do much more than just tell the time. Enjoy your instant 50% Discount on FitLife

    A smartwatch can give you call and message notifications on your wrist; it can monitor your health and motivate you to exercise. But all of this comes at a huge cost as the big brands that control the market have big profit margins. Keeping this in mind, a team of techies devised an advanced smartwatch, FitLife, that offers all the functionalities at a much lower cost.

    It comes with a massive battery backup and you can even answer calls or send emails and messages from your FitLife. This is a fast selling smartwatch with limited stocks. So if you want to own this smartwatch as a reasonable price, then place your order now!

    FitLife Watch Review

    FitLife is an amazing smartwatch that provides you with features of a health tracker and mobile phone in one device you can wear around your wrist. It is like a travel companion that tells you the time and keeps you connected to your family and friends, work, and health. FitLife is an affordable smartwatch that ensures accurate health tracking with the latest biometrics. It is very easy-to-operate and reliable, so it is very popular with todays youngsters and fitness enthusiasts who want to keep themselves updated about their calls and messages.

    How does FitLife work?

    FitLife has the most modern and advanced biometric technology. It measures your blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen levels. The smartwatch can also measure the calories you have burnt during the day. It calculates the amount of time you have slept and computes your sleep pattern. You can also set your alarms and control your music.

    The smartwatch computes the steps you have walked in the entire day. It connects to your phone through the latest Bluetooth. Using GPS, i.e., Global Positioning System, it tracks your fitness activities like cycling, swimming, walking, jogging, running, etc. FitLife provides you with all the information on the number of steps you walked, the kilometers you cycled, and the calories burnt during such activities. If you sit down for too long, it will remind you to walk or exercise. It is compatible with any device, including iOS and Android, so you will face no problem even when you change your phone.

    How to use FitLife?

    It is very simple to set up and use your FitLife smartwatch. You have to open the packing and charge it till the battery is fully charged. In the meantime, download the FitLife app from Google Play Store or Apple Store and connect the watch with Bluetooth. Then your FitLife will work with your smartphone and display notifications for calls, emails, and messages.

    == Supplies Running Out! This 50% OFF Discount

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    Apple Watch Series 6 Beats Garmin’s Fenix 6 Pro For Fitness Tracking In One Important Way

    A Garmin runner’s watch like the Fenix 6 Pro Solar is an obvious choice if you want a wearable to track runs, walks and bike rides. But does it really do the job better than an Apple Watch Series 6?

    I decided to test these watches’ heart rate sensors in the context of a run. An Apple Watch on one wrist, a Garmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar on the other, and a Wahoo Tickr HR strap around the chest, acting as a control for this not-quite-scientific test.

    Here are the results over a roughly 7km run, one dotted with breaks and slow-downs to see how the trackers cope with sharp changes in effort. The Garmin is the red line, the Apple Watch Series 6 the blue line and the Wahoo Tickr the green.

    The most obvious fault here is the Wahoo Tickr chest strap’s. Or, to be fair, my own. Its readings are all patchy and intermittent at the first increase in pace, most likely because the strap wasn’t quite tight enough to start.

    However, it is otherwise the most accurate of the three. And I’ve left the first few minutes of tracking in this graph to highlight the main wearable takeaway.

    The Apple Watch Series 6 starts off from a much better position than the Garmin Fenix 6 Pro, whose results are too high. This is a common observation of Garmins and wearables in general: their HR tracking algorithms tend to assume your heart rate will be far above your resting rate as soon as you begin tracking an exercise.

    If you start the session as you warm-up, it will not be. The Apple Watch Series 6’s readings are very accurate from the first seconds onwards.

    This issue with lower heart rate readings continues throughout the run. In each decrease in pace, or outright stop in the case of the deepest dip in the graph, the Apple Watch Series 6 tightly matches the lowest reading recorded by the Wahoo Tickr chest strap. But the Garmin’s are all routinely slightly higher.

    MORE FROM FORBESGarmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar: Check Out Its 48 Exercise Modes And Fitness Features

    The Garmin Fenix 6 Pro shows significantly higher readings during the cool-down too, aside from an aberrant blip at the end where the recorded rate drops, and then compensates with an artificially high peak.

    Apple’s Watch Series 6 only failed to keep up, slightly, with the Tickr when I went from running to sitting on a bench, to cause a very steep fall in heart rate. The Apple and Garmin’s falls are similarly cliff-like, but not as steep as the Tickr’s.

    The Apple Watch Series 6’s heart rate hardware is superb, obviating the need for a chest strap, for most people. There is another side to this story, though.

    To

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    Get the new Xiaomi Mi Band 5 fitness watch for $38

    photo5224386472575086426

    The Mi Band 5 recently hit US shores. You can get one for just $38.  


    Érika García / CNET

    The Xiaomi Mi Band 5 has arrived in the US, bringing a wealth of impressive features to your wrist on the cheap. How impressive and how cheap? Let’s start with the latter: Walmart has the Xiaomi Mi Band 5 for $38. That’s a couple bucks below the last time I shared this deal and the lowest price I’ve seen yet. Note that it’s being offered via a third-party seller, not Walmart proper.

    The Mi Band 5’s predecessor, the Mi Band 4, was already a pretty solid product, selling for around $35 and standing toe-to-toe with the pricier Fitbit Inspire HR

    The water-resistant Mi Band 5 features a 1.1-inch color AMOLED display (just slightly larger than the Mi Band 4’s), heart rate and oxygen sensors, dozens of animated watch faces, a magnetic charge cord and a 14-day battery.

    That battery represents a bit of a downgrade, as the Mi Band 4 was rated for up to 20 days — though two weeks is still pretty fantastic. The Mi Band 5 adds several new sport modes, however, bringing the total to 11. It also adds menstrual tracking.

    Although CNET’s US team has to yet to do a full-on review of the product, CNET en Espanol covered the Mi Band 5 back in August. You can use Google Translate to read an English version of that review. Verdict: “Interesting new features that together with its low price make it a great choice for those who want to start taking care of themselves.”

    If you’ve already purchased the new wearable, hit the comments and let me know what you think of it!

    First published earlier this year. Updated to reflect new sale price and availability.


    CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and check out our CNET Coupons page for the latest promo codes from Best Buy, Walmart, Amazon and more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

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