Visits

dentist

Ash Pollard visits the dentist for the first time in 10 months



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She’s had her hands full after welcoming her first daughter, Clementine Abigail Ferne, in September.

But on Monday, Ash Pollard took some time out of her busy schedule to visit the dentist for the first time in 10 months. 

The 34-year-old chronicled her experience on her Instagram Stories, by sharing a very detailed video of the procedures she had done.  



a mask with a hat: Show us those pearly whites: On Monday, Ash Pollard (pictured) visited the dentist for the first time in 10 months. The 34-year-old chronicled her experience on her Instagram Stories, by sharing a very detailed video of the procedures she had done


© Provided by Daily Mail
Show us those pearly whites: On Monday, Ash Pollard (pictured) visited the dentist for the first time in 10 months. The 34-year-old chronicled her experience on her Instagram Stories, by sharing a very detailed video of the procedures she had done

‘My first visit to the dentist in 10 months. OMG, too long between cleans thanks,’ she captioned the clip. 

In the video, Ash had used an effect to make her eyes and mouth oversized as she showed off her teeth, which had purple dye on them. 

‘This stuff sticks to the parts on your teeth you aren’t cleaning properly… got to rinse it off first,’ she explained in a caption. 



diagram: Procedures: At one point, Ash was shown laying back in the chair as the dentist worked on cleaning her teeth which she captioned: 'This is my favourite part. I don't know why. I just love it'


© Provided by Daily Mail
Procedures: At one point, Ash was shown laying back in the chair as the dentist worked on cleaning her teeth which she captioned: ‘This is my favourite part. I don’t know why. I just love it’

The dentist was also heard telling her: ‘It’s plaque disclosing solution, you need to rinse it off first, that’s not the actual end result.’ 

Ash was then shown reclining back in the chair as the dentist worked on cleaning her teeth.  

Finally the radio presenter received a fluoride treatment, which she was informed will help ‘protect her teeth against decay and acids’. 



a woman with pink hair taking a selfie: Last treatment: Finally the radio presenter received a fluoride treatment which she was informed will help 'protect her teeth against decay and acids'


© Provided by Daily Mail
Last treatment: Finally the radio presenter received a fluoride treatment which she was informed will help ‘protect her teeth against decay and acids’

It comes after Ash revealed she was finally been able to dye her blonde locks again for the first time since falling pregnant.

Taking to Instagram last month, she shared a picture of herself in the salon’s chair as she awaited to become a sassy shade of peroxide blonde once again.

‘OMG. I’m THAT pumped for this,’ she captioned the shot. 



a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: A whole new woman! Ash revealed that she's finally been able to dye her blonde locks again for the very first time since falling pregnant


© Provided by Daily Mail
A whole new woman! Ash revealed that she’s finally been able to dye her blonde locks again for the very first time since falling pregnant


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medicine

New medicine reduced risk for heart failure emergencies, hospital visits

Embargoed until 10:35 a.m. CT/11:35 a.m. ET, Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

DALLAS, Nov. 13, 2020 — Omecamtiv mecarbil, a new, investigational heart medication, reduced the risk of heart failure-related events in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, according to late-breaking research presented today at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2020. The virtual meeting is Friday, November 13 – Tuesday, November 17, 2020, and is a premier global exchange of the latest scientific advancements, research and evidence-based clinical practice updates in cardiovascular science for health care worldwide. The manuscript of this study is simultaneously published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Ejection fraction is a measurement of the proportion of blood the heart pumps out with each contraction. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, or HFrEF, occurs when the left ventricle, the heart’s largest pumping chamber, loses its ability to contract normally. The heart can’t pump with enough force to push blood into circulation. An ejection fraction of 40% or less is used to define HFrEF. For this study, an EF of ? 35% was required.

The GALACTIC-HF (Global Approach to Lowering Adverse Cardiac Outcomes Through Improving Contractility in Heart Failure) study assessed omecamtiv mecarbil, an investigational medication that was granted “fast track” designation as a new heart failure treatment option by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May 2020.

Omecamtiv mecarbil binds to cardiac myosin, the protein in the heart that transforms chemical energy into mechanical work, thus powering muscle contraction. In previous studies, it was found to improve cardiac function by increasing the effectiveness by which myosin interacts with actin, another protein involved in heart muscle contraction.

“Omecamtiv mecarbil is the first in a class of heart medicines called myotropes that selectively target cardiac muscle to improve cardiac performance,” said John R. Teerlink, M.D., lead author of the study, director of heart failure and of the Echocardiography Laboratory at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco. “In the phase 2 study that led to GALACTIC-HF, omecamtiv mecarbil increased measures of cardiac performance and function. GALACTIC-HF focused on evaluating the effect of this potential medication on outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure.”

GALACTIC-HF was a phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The study enrolled more than 8,000 patients in 35 countries with chronic heart failure who were either currently hospitalized for heart failure or with a recent history of hospitalization or emergency department visit for heart failure within one year prior to screening.

Participants were predominantly male (79%) and white* (78%), with an average age of 66 years and average ejection fraction of 27%. In addition:

62% had coronary artery disease;

  • 40% had Type 2 diabetes;
  • 70% had high blood pressure;
  • 36% had chronic kidney disease; and
  • 25% were hospitalized at the time of enrollment.

* While only 7% of participants self-reported as Black, more Black patients were enrolled in GALACTIC-HF than in any contemporary, international heart failure trial.

Patients

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dentist

Dentist visits go remote during the covid-19 pandemic

The Covid-19 pandemic has transformed many in-person activities into remote services delivered over the internet. The latest example is the dreaded visit to the dentist.

Dvora Brandstatter used to drive her son Elchanan half an hour to the orthodontist and back every month to make sure his braces were working properly. Now, from the comfort of her home in Bergenfield, New Jersey, she attaches a special scope to her smartphone camera, opens an app and inserts the contraption into the 11 year-old’s mouth. A video of the boy’s choppers is sent to his dentist who checks progress, diagnoses any issues and sometimes ends the appointment right there.

“As a parent having fewer appointments is a good thing,” Brandstatter said. “I haven’t seen a downside so far. It’s probably the way everything is moving anyway.”

The app and the scope were created last year by New Jersey-based startup Grin. After the pandemic hit, Chief Executive Officer and dentist Adam Schulhof said the company sped up development of the technology and partnered with manufacturer 3M Co. to quickly distribute it to as many orthodontists as possible. About 5,000 units have shipped out and roughly 1,000 patients have used the system so far, according to Grin.

Schulhof, who uses the system for his own practice, said the coronavirus has spurred huge demand for new procedures that help people reduce the close contact that typically happens when they visit the dentist. The CDC has warned that dental instruments create spray that can contain droplets of water, saliva, blood and other debris, and has advised the use of “teledentistry” as an alternative to in-office care.

When the Grin videos arrive at the dentist’s office, other software from the startup helps practitioners analyze the condition of the teeth and integrates the footage with existing patient management systems. The app also lets patients see what the dentist sees inside their mouth. Not for the faint of heart.

There are already new, internet-focused dental services that Grin is going up against. Companies such as SmileDirectClub Inc. mail invisible aligners and braces to consumers. SmileDirectClub shares have more than doubled since the middle of March. Schulfhof said Grin’s offering is aimed at fighting the challenge to conventional dentistry from such direct-to-consumer offerings. “We’re trying to disrupt the disrupters,” he added.

In the short-term, the technology will help orthodontists keep their businesses running while many patients avoid the dentist’s office completely, the CEO said. As smartphone capabilities improve and the software develops, Schulhof expects Grin’s scope to use artificial intelligence image analysis to become a more powerful diagnostic tool for dentists.

The CEO also sees the technology gaining traction in general dentistry where insurance companies may back its use. People’s teeth decay at different rates and more regular, remote checks, could be used to identify problems before they require more complicated and expensive treatment at in-person visits every six months, he said.

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health

Rhode Island health system halts hospital visits as COVID outbreak worsens

The state’s new cases, hospitalizations and testing positivity rate are rising.

Rhode Island’s largest health care system, Lifespan, has suspended visitation in its hospitals as the state’s COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and positivity testing rate continue to rise.

“Care teams will encourage the use of devices such as smartphones to communicate with patients remotely, and, when available, the use of iPads for virtual visits,” Lifespan said on its website. If patients don’t have a device to use for virtual visits, according to its website, Lifespan will provide one.

Exceptions to the rule, which went into effect Monday, include Hasbro Children’s Hospital, which allows one parent to visit at a time and Newport Hospital’s maternity ward, which allows one birthing partner per patient. One adult may accompany a patient arriving in the emergency department, and that visitor’s stay will be limited.

PHOTO: In this screen grab taken from Google Maps, Rhode Island Hospital is shown.

As of Tuesday, Rhode Island had reported 34,543 cumulative COVID-19 cases and 1,212 related deaths, according to the state health department. Rhode Island’s testing positivity rate was 3.3% this week, which is lower than the 5% threshold the World Health Organization recommends governments get their positivity testing below.

Still, that rate has been slowly rising since September, and combined with increasing cases and hospitalizations, it suggests Rhode Island’s outbreak is moving in the wrong direction.

On a national level, hospitals are filling — 21% of hospitals across the country had more than 80% of their ICU beds filled the week of Oct. 24 through Oct. 30, compared to 17% to 18% during the summertime peak, according to an internal Health and Human Services memo obtained by ABC News.

ABC News’ Josh Margolin contributed to this report.

What to know about the coronavirus:

  • How it started and how to protect yourself: Coronavirus explained
  • What to do if you have symptoms: Coronavirus symptoms
  • Tracking the spread in the U.S. and worldwide: Coronavirus map
  • Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

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    medicine

    Ambassador of Brunei Darussalam visits Sidra Medicine

    Sidra Medicine recently welcomed Mohamed Bahrin Abu Bakar, the Ambassador of Brunei Darussalam to the State of Qatar and Norfazerne Md Jaafar, the Second Secretary to its hospital.

    The Ambassador and Md. Jaafar were welcomed by Mohammed Al Mana, managing director and member of the board of governors at Sidra Medicine;  Prof. Ziyad M. Hijazi, acting chief medical officer and executive chair of pediatric medicine and Hamza Al Kuwari, chief of administrative services.  They were taken on a tour of Sidra Medicine’s specialist pediatric and women’s services wards including the Heart Center. Both parties discussed Sidra Medicine’s role in welcoming patients from Brunei to Qatar and medical tourism. 

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    dentist

    Even dentist visits go remote during the COVID-19 pandemic

    The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed many in-person activities into remote services delivered over the internet. The latest example is the dreaded visit to the dentist.

    Dvora Brandstatter used to drive her son Elchanan half an hour to the orthodontist and back every month to make sure his braces were working properly. Now, from the comfort of her home in Bergenfield, New Jersey, she attaches a special scope to her smartphone camera, opens an app and inserts the contraption into the 11-year-old’s mouth. A video of the boy’s choppers is sent to his dentist, who checks progress, diagnoses any issues and sometimes ends the appointment right there.

    “As a parent, having fewer appointments is a good thing,” Brandstatter said. “I haven’t seen a downside so far. It’s probably the way everything is moving anyway.”

    The app and the scope were created last year by New Jersey-based startup Grin. After the pandemic hit, Chief Executive Officer and dentist Adam Schulhof said the company sped up development of the technology and partnered with manufacturer 3M to quickly distribute it to as many orthodontists as possible. About 5,000 units have shipped out and roughly 1,000 patients have used the system so far, according to Grin.

    Schulhof, who uses the system for his own practice, said the coronavirus has spurred huge demand for new procedures that help people reduce the close contact that typically happens when they visit the dentist. The CDC has warned that dental instruments create spray that can contain droplets of water, saliva, blood and other debris, and has advised the use of “teledentistry” as an alternative to in-office care.

    When the Grin videos arrive at the dentist’s office, other software from the startup helps practitioners analyze the condition of the teeth and integrates the footage with existing patient management systems. The app also lets patients see what the dentist sees inside their mouth. Not for the faint of heart.

    There are already new, internet-focused dental services that Grin is going up against. Companies such as SmileDirectClub mail invisible aligners and braces to consumers. SmileDirectClub shares have more than doubled since the middle of March. Schulfhof said Grin’s offering is aimed at fighting the challenge to conventional dentistry from such direct-to-consumer offerings. “We’re trying to disrupt the disrupters,” he added.

    In the short term, the technology will help orthodontists keep their businesses running while many patients avoid the dentist’s office completely, the CEO said. As smartphone capabilities improve and the software develops, Schulhof expects Grin’s scope to use artificial intelligence image analysis to become a more powerful diagnostic tool for dentists.

    The CEO also sees the technology gaining traction in general dentistry where insurance companies may back its use. People’s teeth decay at different rates and more regular, remote checks, could be used to identify problems before they require more complicated and expensive treatment at in-person visits every six months, he said.

    More on the coronavirus outbreak

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    health

    Outpatient Visits Rebound for Most Specialties to Pre-COVID Levels

    Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

    After taking a nosedive during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, then rising and plateauing, weekly outpatient visits in the United States have rebounded and now slightly exceed levels seen in late February, according to new data.

    Overall visits plunged by almost 60% at the low point in late March and did not start recovering until late June, when visits were still off by 10%. Visits began to rise again — by 2% over the March 1 baseline — around Labor Day.

    As of October 4, visits had returned to that March 1 baseline, which was slightly higher than in late February, according to data analyzed by Harvard University, the Commonwealth Fund, and the healthcare technology company Phreesia, which helps medical practices with patient registration, insurance verification, and payments, and has data on 50,000 providers in all 50 states.

    The study was published online by the Commonwealth Fund.

    In-person visits are still down 6% from the March 1 baseline. Telemedicine visits — which surged in mid-April to account for some 13% to 14% of visits — have subsided to 6% of visits.

    Many states reopened businesses and lifted travel restrictions in early September, benefiting medical practices in some areas. But clinicians in some regions are still facing rising COVID-19 cases, as well as “the challenges of keeping patients and clinicians safe while also maintaining revenue,” write the report authors.

    Some specialties are still hard hit. For the week starting October 4, visits to pulmonologists were off 20% from March 1. Otolaryngology visits were down 17%, and behavioral health visits were down 14%. Cardiology, allergy/immunology, neurology, gastroenterology, and endocrinology also saw drops of 5% to 10% from March.

    Patients were flocking to dermatologists, however. Visits were up 17% over baseline. Primary care was also popular, with a 13% increase over March 1.

    At the height of the pandemic shutdown in late March, Medicare beneficiaries stayed away from doctors the most. Visits dipped 63%, compared with 56% for the commercially insured, and 52% for those on Medicaid. Now, Medicare visits are up 3% over baseline, while Medicaid visits are down 1% and commercially insured visits have risen 1% from March.

    Interestingly, the over-65 age group did not have the steepest drop in visits when analyzed by age. Children ages 3 to 17 saw the biggest decline at the height of the shutdown. Infants to 5-year-olds have still not returned to pre-pandemic visit levels. Those visits are off by 10% to 18%. The 65-and-older group is up 4% from March.

    Larger practices — with more than six clinicians — have seen the biggest rebound, after having had the largest dip in visits, from a decline of 53% in late March to a 14% rise over that baseline. Practices with fewer than five clinicians are still 6% down from the March baseline.

    Wide Variation in Telemedicine Use

    The researchers reported a massive gap in the percentage of various specialties

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