visitors

medicine

Dioxane levels rise; Michigan Medicine further restricts visitors; Small Business Saturday in A2

Happy Friday!

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, even though it likely looked different this year. Today is Black Friday, and although it’s known for great deals to be had at big-box stores, a lesser-known day is Small Business Saturday. Now more than ever, local businesses need support — especially as the pandemic and cold weather restrict operations.

Need some ideas? Main Street Ann Arbor just released its annual shopping guide. Here’s another guide that highlights businesses that are women- and minority-owned. Meanwhile, this gift guide focuses on local food and drink producers. Sarah has also spent the past several months speaking with local business owners and highlighting them for her Small Business Saturday series. Don’t see your favorite business on the list? Submit it here.

Have a great long weekend.

– Meredith (@meredith_A4)

What’s been happening:

⛔️ Michigan Medicine announced this week that no visitors are allowed for adult patients as COVID-19 cases spike across the state. There are some exceptions to the new policy, which took effect on Wednesday. (A4)

🚰 Recent tests from water samples taken in October in the West Park area reveal a spike in Dioxane levels, concerning local officials. (MLive)

🚶‍♀️ The city of Ann Arbor celebrated the grand opening of the Allen Creek Railroad Berm Project this week virtually. (A4)

🚲 Have a look at the new downtown protected bikeway on First Street. (MLive)

🛤 The long-awaited passenger train service from Ann Arbor to Traverse City — known as A2TC — has put test rides slated for 2021 on hold due to the pandemic. (Detroit Free Press)

🎓 A senior at the University of Michigan became the school’s 29th Rhodes Scholar since the awards were established in 1902. (A4)

💻 Toyota and Cisco have partnered to install free Wi-Fi at public sites in the region, including in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. (A4)

Good to know:

🌯 Vegan Kerrytown joint Detroit Street Filling Station expanded into the space next door. The owner said it could become a private dining space or intimate music venue. (A4)

🍪 Have kids ages 8 and up? Love holiday cookies? This local cooking school for kids will be hosting holiday cookie classes online for the whole family. (A4)

🎅 Santa’s Mailbox will return to Main St. this year. From Nov. 28-Dec. 14, write a letter to Santa with a return address and you will receive a response. (A4)

🤝 Tuesday is Giving Tuesday. The annual Rockin’ for the Hungry fund drive by Food Gatherers, ann arbor’s 107one and Kroger will kick off virtually on Tuesday, as will Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s campaign which will feature free performances by Michigan-based artists throughout the day. (A4)

Feature interview of the week:

“We had to pivot to something that is ironic for us, because the whole gist of Literati is that it is a community bookstore that

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medicine

Michigan Medicine restricts visitors for adult patients as COVID-19 cases climb

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has updated its visitor policy with tightened restrictions in order to keep patients and staff safe as COVID-19 cases surge around the state.

As of Wednesday, no visitors will be permitted with adult patients in the health system’s hospitals, unless medically necessary.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

According to Michigan Medicine, the new policy change includes restrictions already announced:

  • No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.
  • At C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, two visitors are allowed for pediatric patients. But family and other visitors are required to wear a mask (covering their mouth and nose) at all Michigan Medicine properties. This includes in a patient room and throughout the facility. Patients who can tolerate a mask must wear one when a health care worker is present in their room.
  • In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance. One primary caregiver is allowed to accompany each pediatric patient to an appointment, unless an additional aide or assistant is required.

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“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology said in a statement. “Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Limiting the risk of transmission of infection has always been a critical priority at Michigan Medicine,” Washer said in a statement. “And I want to reassure the public that if you need health care for a new problem or for continuing care of a chronic problem, you should not put it off.

“We have teams dedicated to keeping our patients and staff safe in our buildings. It is important to not delay emergency or chronic care.”

Washer urged people to avoid Thanksgiving gatherings this year with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving,” she said in a statement. “If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread.

“We need everyone’s help with this. A large surge of

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medicine

Michigan Medicine tightens restrictions for visitors

Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has tightened visitor restrictions for adult patients to minimize the spread of COVID-19 as cases continue to rise.

Beginning Wednesday, there will be no visitors allowed with adult patients at Michigan Medicine hospitals, except for some exceptions. Those exceptions are for end-of-life care, labor ad delivery, and other detailed here.

The new policy go with the other restrictions that have already been announced, which include no visitors with adult emergency department patients, two visitors for pediatric patients, and no visitors for adult patients at clinics.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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medicine

Michigan Medicine announces restrictions to visitors as statewide COVID-19 cases surge

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine announced Monday it has added visitor restrictions at its hospitals and clinics to curb the spread of COVID-19 and to protect patients and staff.

Visitors are no longer allowed in the adult emergency department, except when medically necessary.

Its visitor policy at its adult hospitals and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital remains unchanged: one visitor per day per adult and two for pediatric patients. Visitors, including family, are required to wear a face covering that covers their nose and mouth at all Michigan Medicine properties, including inside a patient’s room. Patients who are able to tolerate a mask must wear one in the presence of a health care worker.

No visitors will be allowed in clinics for adult patients unless the patient has a physical or cognitive impairment that requires assistance. For pediatric patients, one primary caregiver is allowed at an appointment, unless an additional assistant or aide is required.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

 Like what you’re reading? Sign up for our email newsletter here!

“We recognize the critical role that visitors – families and friends – play in the well-being of our patients. However, as the spread of COVID-19 hits record-setting levels across the state, we need to minimize the risk of transmission,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, said in a statement.

“Our top priority is the safety of our patients and our staff. We hope that by adding these restrictions, we will better protect everyone from COVID-19,” Washer continued. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Many people in our facilities are very sick or have weakened immune systems, which places them at higher risk,” Washer said in a statement. “Limiting visitors and requiring a mask at all times will help reduce the spread of infection.”

Related reading:

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health

Bay Area considering 2-week quarantine for out-of-state visitors

As coronavirus cases surge across the country, Bay Area health directors are concerned about the impact of the upcoming holiday travel season on virus spread in a region that has generally kept the pandemic under control.

Marin County Public Health Officer Matt Willis said the health directors meet twice a week and on Thursday they will discuss whether to implement a 14-day quarantine for visitors from states with high rates of infections and residents who travel to these states and then return. If implemented, Willis said it would most likely be a “strong recommendation” and not an order.

“I want to be clear, it’s a conversation. We haven’t made a decision,” Willis said. “This is a well-established tool for containing COVID-19 spread, when the gradient gets low enough inside compared to those on the outside. That’s a conversation you might expect us to have.”

The city and county of San Francisco also confirmed that a decision hasn’t been made on whether to introduce a quarantine restriction.


“The Bay Area health directors have been communicating and working together since the onset of the pandemic, including coordination of the shelter in place announcement,” read a statement from the city’s COVID command center. “During the course of these discussions, many policies and protocols are discussed, including upcoming travel during the holiday season.”

Daily infections are rising in all but three states, but the surge is most pronounced in the Midwest and Southwest.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska, North Dakota and New Mexico all reported record high hospitalizations this week. Nebraska’s largest hospitals started limiting elective surgeries and looked to bring in nurses from other states to cope with the surge. Hospital officials in Iowa and Missouri warned bed capacity could soon be overwhelmed.

Meanwhile, the Bay Area generally has the virus under control with only Sonoma County still in the most-restrictive purple tier in the state’s system for reopening. Solano County is in the second-worst red category. All other counties are orange, the tier when the virus spread is considered moderate, except for San Francisco, which is in the least-restrictive yellow tier, marked by minimal transmission.

San Francisco has a positivity rate of 0.8% while Marin County is at 1%.

“We are now lower incident than many other areas,” Willis said. “We’re seeing dramatic increases outside the state. We have made a lot of progress regionally. As hard as it is to reduce incidents, it’s hard to maintain those gains, especially as you’re seeing surges in other states.”

Many other states have introduced similar requirements. New York, for example, requires a 14-day quarantine or a negative COVID-19 test for out-of-state travelers.

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health

Hawaii’s Lanai imposes stay-at-home order, closes to visitors

Hawaii’s governor has implemented a stay-at-home order and travel restrictions for the island of Lanai beginning Tuesday because of an outbreak of coronavirus infections.

Gov. David Ige signed the order Monday requiring residents and visitors to remain at home or where they’re staying, except for essential purposes such as grocery shopping.

Travel to and from Lanai, which is the smallest inhabited island in Hawaii and is nine miles from Maui, is expected to be restricted to essential workers or for medical purposes, while anyone arriving on the island must quarantine for 14 days.

Even though it’s tiny, Lanai is big in the luxury vacation world. Larry Ellison snapped up nearly all of the Hawaiian island of Lanai for $300 million in 2012, and has since poured millions into transforming the former “Pineapple Isle.”

Ellison closed, renovated and reopened two five-star hotels, the 213-room seaside Four Seasons Resort Lanai (reopened in 2016) and the 96-room Sensei Lanai, A Four Seasons Resort (Formerly the Lodge at Koele), located in the island’s interior highlands. After closing due to COVID-19 last spring, both reopened to visitors on Oct. 15, but now their websites state they “are currently closed but accepting reservations for stays from November 10, 2020, onward.”

A Four Seasons spokesperson told SFGATE that all hotel guests have returned home or moved to other islands, and confirmed both hotels are now closed.


Maui County Mayor Michael Victorino said the order would remain in effect for two weeks but could be extended if the number of cases keeps rising on Lanai.

The state Department of Health reported 79 infections there as of Monday, but officials predicted the figure could grow. Lanai had not reported any cases before last week.

The number of cases could be higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick.

Straub Medical Center in Honolulu and the Hawaii National Guard planned to send personnel to help with testing.

Social distancing to slow the spread of the virus is a challenge for residents crowded at home and elsewhere, Victorino said.

“All they have to do is one person gets sick and it transmits very quickly throughout the community because they go to the same churches, they don’t wear masks as often or as they should,” Victorino said. “I think that’s something that’s been really negligible on their part. But we’re now trying to educate them.”

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some — especially older adults and people with existing health problems — it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.

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