therapy

dentist

Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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medicine

SPORTS MEDICINE: Hamstrung by incomplete therapy | John Doherty

That conclusion was bolstered by the fact that only hamstring grafts tore among the Delaware subjects. Those with that type of graft had been allowed to return to sport four months sooner than those whose graft came from the patellar tendon. The latter traditionally takes longer because it is often more painful. Yet, that extra time probably allows the graft to more fully mature.

In short, at least for the females in the Delaware study, the culprit was incomplete rehabilitation.

A study just released online by Sports Health blamed the same for poor performance upon return to sport after a hamstring strain. Conducted by Australian investigators, the study looked at professional soccer, rugby, and Australian Rules football players who suffered hamstring strains over the course of one season and who had played at least five games prior to injury and at least five games after returning.

The researchers were motivated by a hamstring injury rate of 17% in all of those sports in Australia each year, the highest rate for any lower extremity muscle group.

A total of 15 players qualified for the study and the focus of the study was on their ability to sprint upon returning to play. The study determined that seven of the 15 could run just as fast for just as long after the injury but seven others were significantly impaired in their ability to maintain top speed for the remainder of the season. One of the subjects was actually better.

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medicine

Pro Active Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Opens a New Clinic in Brighton

CARLSBAD, Calif., Nov. 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Physical Rehabilitation Network (PRN) of Carlsbad, Calif., a leading physical therapy provider and practice management organization, today announced the grand opening of its affiliated Pro Active Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine (Pro Active) clinic in Brighton, Colo., located at 1321 South. 4th Ave. The Pro Active Brighton clinic elevates the brand’s presence in the state to 13.

Pro Active’s new outpatient clinic will support all ages and is proud to offer the Brighton community and surrounding areas a full range of pain management and injury prevention services including: physical therapy, functional integrative therapy, work injury rehabilitation, blood flow restriction therapy and sports medicine for a combined approach to pain resolution and injury recovery.

“The opening of our Brighton clinic is another critical step toward our commitment to expand access to quality physical therapy care across the state of Colorado,” said Ajay Gupta, CEO, PRN. Led by Kate Farner, we have assembled an extremely talented, experienced and passionate team at the Brighton location, who are proud to not only offer high-quality care but provide a safe and rewarding experience for patients seeking care.”

Clinic partner, [Kate] Farner, PT, DPT, ATC, will oversee the new Brighton location. A native of the California desert, Farner moved to northern Colorado in 2003 after receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science (Athletic Training) from the University of Northern Colorado in 2006. Farner also has a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Regis University.

Farner is a Licensed Physical Therapist and Certified Athletic Trainer specializing in the treatment of orthopedic injuries, sports injuries, cumulative trauma disorders, occupational injuries, concussions and vestibular disorders. Farner is also full body certified in both Active Release Techniques, Trigger Point Dry Needling and is a Certified Vestibular Rehabilitation Specialist. 

“I’m very excited for this opportunity to lead the PT programs at the Brighton clinic,” said Farner, Clinic Partner & Director. “By expanding care to the Brighton community, we close a significant gap between those needing quality pain management support and the resources available to them. If you are in need of physical therapy care, no doctor or healthcare practitioner referral is needed, so come visit our Brighton clinic today and you’ll see why our patients love coming to us.”

Pro Active accepts most insurance plans and will work with patients to help them better understand benefits and what services will be covered by insurance. To learn more about Pro Active, please visit proactivecolorado.com.

For more information on PRN locations or partnership opportunities, visit PRNpt.com. You can also follow us @PRNPhysicalTherapy on Facebook, @PRN_therapy on Twitter or on LinkedIn. 

COVID-19 Safety Statement

With safety as a top priority, Pro Active is actively taking the necessary steps to ensure patient care is completed with strict infection control measures. Pro Active will continue to act with an abundance of caution in alignment with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the Occupational Safety

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medicine

UH professor is developing a Chinese herbal medicine formula to improve cancer therapy

University of Houston professor of pharmaceutics Ming Hu is developing and testing an ancient Chinese herbal medicine formula, first described in 280 A.D., to improve cancer therapy. Hu believes Xiao-Chai-Hu Tang (XCHT) can protect people on the chemotherapy drug Irinotecan from a deadly side effect: Severe-delayed-onset diarrhea (SDOD).

The clinical use of Irinotecan is severely limited by the severe diarrhea that results in poor quality of life, hospitalization and even death. Our goal with XCHT is to allow more people to benefit from the treatment by Irinotecan, which is often the drug of last resort for late stage or metastatic cancer patients.”


Ming Hu, the Diana S-L. Chow Endowed Professor of Drug Discovery and Development at UH

Hu and colleagues Romi Ghose, associate professor of pharmaceutics at UH and Song Gao of Texas Southern University, have been awarded $996,162 from the National Cancer Institute to investigate the effectiveness of the ancient formula. They will also work with Lijun Zhu of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China to determine the agent’s effectiveness in a clinical trial.

To be sure, Irinotecan is a powerful weapon against cancer, but many of those who take it develop SDOD, likely caused by SN-38, the active metabolite of the drug. In the intestine, SN-38 can damage intestinal cells and affect their renewal.

“Intestinal cells have UGT enzymes that detoxify SN-38, but we found that SN-38 can also inactivate and reduce UGT enzymes in the intestine. This creates a vicious cycle. Approximately 1-in-5 patients will fall into this vicious cycle, leading to discontinuation of therapy, decreased efficacy or even death,” said Hu. He has shown that XCHT protects the UGT enzymes and reduces severe diarrhea, and with the new grant he will develop it further, for testing and approvals.

XCHT is actively used in China, Japan and Korea for liver protection. This is the first instance where it has been shown to protect the intestine from SN-38, making the UGT enzymes more resistant to the impact of SN-38.

“Our long-term goal is to develop experimental therapeutics and/or nutritional supplemental approaches to reduce SDOD, so patients can sustain their chemotherapy,” said Hu.

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medicine

Combining Eastern medicine with Western to improve cancer therapy

IMAGE

IMAGE: University of Houston professor of pharmaceutics Ming Hu is developing and testing the ancient Chinese herbal medicine formula, Xiao-Chai-Hu Tang (XCHT), first described in medical literature in 280 A.D., to…
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Credit: University of Houston

University of Houston professor of pharmaceutics Ming Hu is developing and testing an ancient Chinese herbal medicine formula, first described in 280 A.D., to improve cancer therapy. Hu believes Xiao-Chai-Hu Tang (XCHT) can protect people on the chemotherapy drug Irinotecan from a deadly side effect: Severe-delayed-onset diarrhea (SDOD).

“The clinical use of Irinotecan is severely limited by the severe diarrhea that results in poor quality of life, hospitalization and even death,” said Hu, who is also the Diana S-L. Chow Endowed Professor of Drug Discovery and Development at UH.

“Our goal with XCHT is to allow more people to benefit from the treatment by Irinotecan, which is often the drug of last resort for late stage or metastatic cancer patients.”

Hu and colleagues Romi Ghose, associate professor of pharmaceutics at UH and Song Gao of Texas Southern University, have been awarded $996,162 from the National Cancer Institute to investigate the effectiveness of the ancient formula. They will also work with Lijun Zhu of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China to determine the agent’s effectiveness in a clinical trial.

To be sure, Irinotecan is a powerful weapon against cancer, but many of those who take it develop SDOD, likely caused by SN-38, the active metabolite of the drug. In the intestine, SN-38 can damage intestinal cells and affect their renewal.

“Intestinal cells have UGT enzymes that detoxify SN-38, but we found that SN-38 can also inactivate and reduce UGT enzymes in the intestine. This creates a vicious cycle. Approximately 1-in-5 patients will fall into this vicious cycle, leading to discontinuation of therapy, decreased efficacy or even death,” said Hu. He has shown that XCHT protects the UGT enzymes and reduces severe diarrhea, and with the new grant he will develop it further, for testing and approvals.

XCHT is actively used in China, Japan and Korea for liver protection. This is the first instance where it has been shown to protect the intestine from SN-38, making the UGT enzymes more resistant to the impact of SN-38.

“Our long-term goal is to develop experimental therapeutics and/or nutritional supplemental approaches to reduce SDOD, so patients can sustain their chemotherapy,” said Hu.

###

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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health

Oregon Decriminalizes Small Amounts Of Heroin, Meth, Cocaine, Legalizes Magic Mushrooms For Therapy

Topline

Oregon voters on Tuesday approved the most progressive drug policy in the U.S. with a pair of ballot measures that legalize psilocybin mushrooms for mental health treatment, decriminalize small amounts of street drugs and establish a drug treatment program funded by marijuana tax dollars.

Key Facts

Oregon voters passed both Measure 109 and Measure 110, which both drastically alter the state’s drug policy as advocates aim to combat addiction using public health tools instead of incarceration.

Measure 109 creates a program for licensed professionals to administer magic mushrooms to help with depression, anxiety, and addiction—but people would only be allowed to consume psilocybin at regulated treatment centers.

Measure 110 decriminalizes small amounts of cocaine, meth, psilocybin mushrooms, LSD, MDMA, methadone and oxycodone for both adults and juveniles and instead imposes a maximum $100 fine for possession. 

The initiative overhauls the state’s addiction treatment program by creating 16 “health assessment centers” from marijuana tax revenue; if someone is caught with small amounts of a controlled substance, they can either pay the $100 fine or get the fee waived by taking a free health assessment at a treatment center.

At treatment centers, clients will be assigned individual case managers for screening and referral services, but only if the client “indicates a desire” to address any identified substance abuse issues, according to the text of the measure.

Key Background

Advocates have been pushing for drug reform in recent years, arguing that users need treatment instead of jail time, especially because there are large racial disparities in who gets punished for drug crimes. The ACLU, the Drug Policy Alliance and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg along with his wife Priscilla Chan, all donated money to pass Measure 110. It’s also endorsed by the Oregon Nurses Association and the Oregon Public Health Association and the NAACP Portland.

Crucial Quote

“Instead of arresting and jailing people for possessing small amounts of drugs, Measure 110 would shift to a health-based approach, and use marijuana tax revenue to pay for more addiction and other health services. Measure 110 will save money and save lives,” the Drug Policy Alliance said.

Chief Critics

Some healthcare providers say the measure doesn’t do enough to ensure those addicted to drugs get treatment, and would divert marijuana tax revenue currently used for K-12 schools and existing addiction treatment programs. “It would only require the creation of 16 centers to provide screenings and referrals. It does not require the creation of a single new treatment bed,” Paul C. Coelho, Salem Health Pain Clinic’s medical director, wrote in a Statesman Journal op-ed. “Referrals are not treatment. Screenings are not access.”

Critics, including the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police, also say it would be dangerous for children. “The measure would make it so a 15-year-old can get caught with a pocket full of meth, and the only consequences

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health

California Prop 14 may change lives of sick kids, keep taxpayer funding of stem cell therapy research

Three-year-old Ava was constantly sick. Her gums were inflamed, and every time she got a scraped knee, it turned into a dangerous infection.

Her parents, Alicia and Jon Langenhop, were months pregnant with their third child when they learned that Ava’s constellation of symptoms added up to an extremely rare, inherited disorder of the white blood cells, called leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1. Although antibiotics and antivirals could prolong her life, the disease was considered fatal, usually before kindergarten.

Ava’s primary hope, doctors told the Langenhops, was a bone marrow transplant from someone who was a good match, probably a brother or a sister.

Two-year-old Olivia had inherited the same disease as her big sister. She had been hospitalized with infections, too.

The baby in Alicia’s belly would be the girls’ best hope. Since both parents were carriers of the rare genetic mutation, the new baby, a boy, had a 25% chance of inheriting it, too.

Alicia was still in the hospital last October when they found out baby Landon had the mutation. Around the same time, the couple learned of a research trial in California.

Children Ava, Olivia and Landon Langenhop were diagnosed with an extremely rare, inherited disorder of the white blood cells, called leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1. California Proposition 14, a citizen-initiated ballot measure, authorizes bonds continuing stem cell research.
Children Ava, Olivia and Landon Langenhop were diagnosed with an extremely rare, inherited disorder of the white blood cells, called leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1. California Proposition 14, a citizen-initiated ballot measure, authorizes bonds continuing stem cell research.

Doctors would take each child’s blood cells, fix the mutation and return them. It should be a permanent fix, with less risk than a bone marrow transplant because the healthy cells would be their own, so their bodies wouldn’t reject them as foreign.  

The approach had been tried in only one child, though.

This is the type of research reaching patients nearly two decades after President George W. Bush banned federal funding of stem cell research and 16 years after California residents approved a tax increase on themselves to support research.

Proposition 14 on Tuesday’s ballot asks whether Californians want to continue this work, providing $5.5 billion for stem cell research over the next three decades.

In the early 2000s, stem cell research was controversial because it often required the destruction of human embryos. Though embryonic stem cells remain essential for some therapies, in cases such as the Langenhops’, treatment focuses on manipulating a person’s own cells.

Stem cell science has made tremendous progress, but as in most new fields, the pace remains painstakingly slow. Every treatment has to be the subject of years of trial-and-error research, and many scientific hurdles linger. 

Stem cells have been used to treat rare diseases, such as severe combined immunodeficiency, also known as “bubble boy disease,” and they are being tested in more common conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, macular degeneration, Type 1 diabetes and even heart disease.

“Even if a subset of stuff in the pipeline goes all the way, it will change the world for patients who currently don’t have other good options,” said Sean Morrison, a stem cell biologist in Dallas.

“It’s a pivotal time in the field,” said

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health

Global Oncolytic Virus Therapy Market 2026 Companies Clinical Trials Insight

Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Market Offers US$ 700 Million Opportunity With More Than 125 therapies in Clinical Trials says Kuick Research

DELHI, India, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — “Global Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Market, Dosage, Price & Clinical Trials Outlook 2026” Report Highlights:

  • Global Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Market: US$ 700 Million Opportunity

  • Global Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Clinical Trials: >125 Therapies In Trials

  • USA Dominates Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Clinical Trials: >50 Therapies In Trials

  • Comprehensive Insight on Clinical & Non Clinical Issues Related to Global Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy Market Development

  • Approved Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy: 2

  • Global Research Progress & Medical Advancement Insight

  • Imlygic (Talimogene laherparepvec) & Oncorine: Dosage, Price & Patent insight

Download Report: https://www.kuickresearch.com/report-oncolytic-virus-immunotherapy-market-size-sales-clinical-trials-cancer-oncology-melanoma-report-talimogene-laherparepvec-imlygic–oncorine

Recent breakthrough with respect to oncolytic virus therapy in the oncology pharmaceutical industry has set up remarkable achievements in terms of understanding all the important proposed hallmarks for counteracting cancer mechanism of action. The important clinical management terms related with oncolytic virus therapy is believed to be extracting and abolishing all the disadvantages and limitations that were associated with all the commercially available cancer therapies. Certain challenges that were residing in the oncology pharmaceutical industry is estimated to end once the market associated with oncolytic virus therapy comes into full power in terms of financial and commercial availability.

The wide range applications of oncolytic virus therapy with respect to different types of cancers such as melanoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer and many others is estimated to deliver a very bulk amount of research and development investment for the future progress of the therapy at global level. The estimated future market competition oncolytic virus therapy is intense as the market is associated with some of the leading drug research and development players, high research marketing as well as a monopoly situation in treating different types of cancers. As per the study conducted for the market, it is estimated that in the next few years, the market will surpass USD 700 Million by 2026.

In a short period of time, oncolytic virus therapy has selectively replaced all the other traditional cancer therapies available for the cancer patients as the therapy is adjoined with large number of innovative principles. Several therapeutic agents under oncolytic virus therapy has entered clinical studies and have specifically proven to be safe and efficient for human use. Although the market is few years old but the related research and development sector as well as future research is believed to make the system functional as well as effective for millions of cancer patients who have been suffering very badly from past few years.

With the arrival of oncolytic virus therapy for the cancer patients, all the barriers that were pursed in the oncology pharmaceutical industry have been overcome promisingly as the therapy has entered and been recognized as a mainstream treatment facility for the clinical management of the cancer cells. The long-term future of the market at global level appears to be developing at a rate that is highly advanced as researchers

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health

‘I’m an Psychologist and These Are The Light Therapy Treatments I Recommend for Seasonal Affective Disorder’

If you’re finding yourself cursing the reality of darker mornings and even darker, longer nights, you could be dealing with the pangs of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a very real type of depression that becomes more severe as winter approaches.



a man that is standing in the dark: Chances are you're not the only one experiencing the blues as the mercury drops. Here's how you can push back


© Mint Images – Getty Images
Chances are you’re not the only one experiencing the blues as the mercury drops. Here’s how you can push back

Despite how it may feel, you’re not the only one — it’s thought that around 10-20 per cent of people in the UK experience “mildly debilitating” symptoms of seasonal affective disorder as the weather gets colder and six per cent of adults will experience “recurrent major depressive episodes with seasonal pattern”. Currently, the average age at which seasonal affective disorder symptoms present themselves is 27-years-old in both men and women. Both genders are equally affected.

Despite enjoying an extra hour in bed, most of us will, especially at this time, be spending the majority of daylight hour indoors. For many, this could impact mental health — a 2019 YouGov poll found that 29 per cent of UK adults will experience some kind of depressive symptoms this winter, while six per cent of us will suffer seasonal affective disorder to the point where they’re unable to work or to function properly.

Worried about SAD? Don’t be. We’re here to help with our digestible guide on seasonal affective disorder including expert advice, study commentary, actionable advice, product information and more.



a sunset over a grass field: Cold Dawn Sunrise


© George W Johnson
Cold Dawn Sunrise

What Causes Seasonal Affective Disorder?

A form of depression that’s directly related to the changing of the seasons, seasonal affective disorder is experienced most commonly when summer transitions into winter. As it’s as seasonal issue, seasonal affective disorder is often experienced every 12 months. “Patients often begin experiencing symptoms of depression during autumn and often do not feel an improvement in mood until the spring,” explains Dr. Chun Tang, general Practitioner at Pall Mall Medical.

But how is seasonal affective disorder caused?

The research is sporadic, but one cause, it’s believed, is the correlation between the reduced exposure to sunlight and shorter days in winter. That’s because the hormone melatonin, responsible for controlling our sleep cycles, becomes “phase delayed” by people experiencing seasonal affective disorder, leading us to feel sluggish, tired and irritable — regardless of how many espressos have bene imbibed. Stress levels will rise, too, thereby impacting our mental wellbeing, immunity and overall health.

Similarly, serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates anxiety, happiness and mood, could have a bigger impact than previously thought. Due to winter having shorter days and darker weather, there typically isn’t enough natural daylight, which causes a drop in serotonin levels in our brains. On a biological level, this increases the likelihood of someone experiencing a depressive episode.

Seasonal Affective Disorder: What Are The Symptoms?

According to the NHS, symptoms of SAD can include:

  • A persistent low mood
  • A loss of pleasure or interest in normal everyday activities
  • Irritability
  • Feelings of despair, guilt and
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health

Asia Pacific Laser Therapy Market Forecast to 2027

The Asia Pacific laser therapy market is expected to reach US$ 768. 52 million by 2027 from US$ 348. 67 million in 2019; it is estimated to grow with a CAGR of 10. 5% from 2020 to 2027. The laser therapy market in Asia Pacific grows substantially due to growing medical applications of laser therapy and technological developments in laser therapies.

New York, Oct. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Asia Pacific Laser Therapy Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Type ; Application ; End User, and Geography” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978827/?utm_source=GNW
However, the high prices of laser therapy and devices hinder the growth of the market.

Laser therapy, a non-invasive medical procedure, uses the light of a specific wavelength to treat various diseases.This procedure is used to remove tumors or abnormal cell growth, perform hair and skin treatments, remove kidney stones, and repair a detached retina.

In medicine, the laser allows surgeons to work at a high level of precision by focusing on a definite area, and this process creates lesser damage than the traditional methods of surgery. The process of laser therapy is however costly and may require repetitive visits to the surgeon.

Various medical device manufacturers and start-ups introduce the latest technologies in the market and the availability of various advanced products allows medical professionals to improve patients’ health by enhancing their treatment efficiency. For instance, in February 2020, IRIDEX Corporation, a manufacturer of ophthalmic laser-based medical products, launched an upgraded second-generation version of MicroPulse P3 device to treat glaucoma, and the upgrades made to the device are expected to substantially reduce intraocular pressure suitable for glaucoma patients without incisions.

Furthermore, in June 2020, Cynosure launched Elite iQ Aesthetic Workstation for laser hair removal and skin revitalization in Australia, allowing faster treatment with higher max energy compared with previous generation devices.Moreover, in February 2019, GakSung introduced the Laser Queen, a low-level laser and LED therapy known as photon light therapy, in India to treat a variety of conditions.

Thus, the consistent technological developments through the launch of new products in the market augment the growth of the laser therapy market in Asia Pacific.

China, Japan, India, Australia, and South Korea are the most affected countries due to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases and the associated deaths.Manufacturers and suppliers of medical devices are shifting their focus from regular laser therapy devices to the development and supply of COVID-19 essentials and medical devices used for respiratory issues.

This scenario adversely impacts the dermatology & cosmetic and minimally invasive therapies performed with laser devices.

Based on type, in 2019, the diode segment held the largest share of the market and is expected to grow at the fastest CAGR during the forecast period.This segment witnesses a lucrative growth owing to its rapid adoption in photodynamic treatments and aesthetic procedures.

Additionally, the diode laser is used for processes such as incision, hemostasis, and coagulation. Moreover, the implementation of diode laser causes minimal

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