Survivor

dentist

‘Happier to be free:’ Abuse survivor has broken teeth fixed for free

A Lantana woman had always been strong and independent.

When she finally walked away from her five-year abusive relationship, she noticed she had briefly lost many of her hardworking assets.

The 32-year-old, who wants to be identified as Jane, is rebuilding her life and is using her experience to help others realize they can live a life they’re proud of and deserve.

“I knew his behavior was wrong. I knew the situation was wrong. I was trying to get out of it, but they trap you,” she said. 

ALSO READ: The opioid trap: The search for recovery

The most recent done at the hands of the man Jane thought she knew and loved left her bloodied and bruised, with horrible marks on her face.



a close up of a persons face


© Provided by WPEC West Palm Beach


“He punched me in the face and knocked me cold to the ground,” she said. “Thankfully, I’ve never seen his face again.”

Jane broke her silence about her abusive relationship while in the hospital that night. Jane says victims don’t deserve to have their world unraveling on the inside, they need to tell someone.

“I felt like I put myself in this position and that I needed to get myself out of it, so I was honestly working to try to get myself out of it,” she said. “You need to ask for help, you need to tell people your situation, you need to accept the help.”

In this season of giving, dentists at Spodak Dental Group in Delray Beach want to turn her tragedy to triumph. For them, that’s helping to boost her self-esteem and sense of self-worth with a restored smile at no cost.



a man and a woman standing in a room


© Provided by WPEC West Palm Beach


“My sincere hope is that her confidence and her strength, sends a message to someone at home who is in an abusive relationship to not take it anymore,” said Dr. Craig Spodak of Spodak Dental Group. “To take care of their family and leave a relationship like that.”

“I have a great view on life. I am so happy right now, I never felt happier to be free. I won’t let this define me in anyway shape or form,” Jane said. “I had no idea of the resources that were out there.”

There are several resources available in Palm Beach County, including Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, or AVDA, with a team working around the clock to get survivors shelter and transitional housing. Right now, they’re getting between 180 to 200 calls a month, a significant climb.

“We’re finding unfortunately that the violence level, the lethality level of these situations, is very high, guns are involved, multiple children,” said Jennifer Rey, Program Services Director at Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse.

While it’s high, she says rooms are available and safety measures are in place for those who want to reach out and escape.

“We have PPE for everybody. We have a cleaning regime that’s making the place wiped down every 8 hours, so we’re

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dentist

‘Happier to be free:’ Abuse survivor cries for joy after dentist fix broken teeth for free

A Lantana woman had always been strong and independent.

When she finally walked away from her five-year abusive relationship, she noticed she had briefly lost many of her hardworking assets.

The 32-year-old, who wants to be identified as Jane, is rebuilding her life and is using her experience to help others realize they can live a life they’re proud of and deserve.

“I knew his behavior was wrong. I knew the situation was wrong. I was trying to get out of it, but they trap you,” she said. 

ALSO READ: The opioid trap: The search for recovery

The most recent done at the hands of the man Jane thought she knew and loved left her bloodied and bruised, with horrible marks on her face.

“He punched me in the face and knocked me cold to the ground,” she said. “Thankfully, I’ve never seen his face again.”

Jane broke her silence about her abusive relationship while in the hospital that night. Jane says victims don’t deserve to have their world unraveling on the inside, they need to tell someone.

“I felt like I put myself in this position and that I needed to get myself out of it, so I was honestly working to try to get myself out of it,” she said. “You need to ask for help, you need to tell people your situation, you need to accept the help.”

In this season of giving, dentists at Spodak Dental Group in Delray Beach want to turn her tragedy to triumph. For them, that’s helping to boost her self-esteem and sense of self-worth with a restored smile at no cost.



a man and a woman standing in a room


© Provided by WPEC West Palm Beach


“My sincere hope is that her confidence and her strength, sends a message to someone at home who is in an abusive relationship to not take it anymore,” said Dr. Craig Spodak of Spodak Dental Group. “To take care of their family and leave a relationship like that.”

“I have a great view on life. I am so happy right now, I never felt happier to be free. I won’t let this define me in anyway shape or form,” Jane said. “I had no idea of the resources that were out there.”

There are several resources available in Palm Beach County, including Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, or AVDA, with a team working around the clock to get survivors shelter and transitional housing. Right now, they’re getting between 180 to 200 calls a month, a significant climb.

“We’re finding unfortunately that the violence level, the lethality level of these situations, is very high, guns are involved, multiple children,” said Jennifer Rey, Program Services Director at Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse.

While it’s high, she says rooms are available and safety measures are in place for those who want to reach out and escape.

“We have PPE for everybody. We have a cleaning regime that’s making the place wiped down every 8 hours, so we’re going a lot to make it safe

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health

A survivor. A funeral director. A marriage divided. How Americans’ COVID experiences shape their votes

HOUSTON, TEXAS-JULY 1, 2020-HOUSTON, TEXAS-JULY 1, 2020-Putting a patient on a ventilator is a last resort. Dr. Joseph Varon, center, does emergency treatment on Terry Hill, age 65, after putting him on a ventilator assisted by his team of nurses and medical students. At United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, Dr. Joseph Varon leads a team to fight the increasing number of coronavirus patients in the expanded Covid-19 ward on July 1, 2020. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times)
Dr. Joseph Varon, center, does emergency treatment on a COVID-19 patient at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston this summer. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

In Wisconsin, a funeral home director who has watched the COVID-19 pandemic rip through her community can only blame President Trump.

In Texas, little can change one woman’s loyalty to the president — not even her own struggle for breath as she lay in a hospital bed.

In New Mexico, an underemployed firearms instructor plans to cast his vote as a rebuke to Democrats he says were overzealous in closing businesses.

In Arizona, a Joe Biden voter found political detente with his Republican wife as the lingering effects of infection continue to cause them pain.

In Michigan, a school bus driver won over by the president before the pandemic deepened her devotion and took up arms to protest shutdowns.

Even before the coronavirus sunk in its teeth, the United States was deeply polarized. Facts mattered less than feelings and political parties acted like tribes.

The virus — a shared, microscopic enemy that demanded a unified response — offered the nation a chance to come together. But from face masks to shutdowns, the pandemic quickly became the main thing Americans were fighting over.

As the death toll grew so did anxieties about who would win the presidency.

Election day arrives as the virus surges like never before, with an average of more than 80,000 new cases reported each day last week — well over previous spikes and up more than 44% from two weeks earlier.

Once concentrated in urban centers like New York and later in Sun Belt states, the virus is now ravaging the rural Midwest and Rocky Mountain states.

Field hospitals have been pitched in parking lots from Texas to Wisconsin. In the past week, hospitalizations reached new highs in 18 different states.

Treatment is improving and infections are increasingly concentrated in younger people with high odds of survival, but experts predict a significant rise in the U.S. death toll, which now tops 230,000.

The surge poses a dilemma for officials trying to balance health concerns with economic ones as the public grows wary of more forced shutdowns.

Polls suggest that most voters have made up their minds — and record numbers have already cast their ballots.

All of the issues that divided America before coronavirus have been eclipsed.

This is the pandemic election. And these are the stories of five voters.

The funeral home director

The first call came in late March.

A 70-year-old had died shortly after being taken off a ventilator. Michelle Pitts sent a hearse to pick up his body from the hospital.

Michelle Pitts, owner of New Pitts Mortuary, stands outside her Milwaukee funeral home.
Michelle Pitts, owner of New Pitts Mortuary, stands outside her Milwaukee funeral home. (Kurtis Lee / Los Angeles Times)

There would be no funeral, just a burial at the cemetery attended by three relatives. The family was too worried about contagion.

Pitts was left with the feeling that “this virus was going to be

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health

2020 Survivor Profile – Claudia Tavano

When Claudia Tavano, then 52, was diagnosed with stage I ductal carcinoma in situ of her left breast in 2011, the Sayville resident was convinced the disease would kill her. “All I could think of was how am I going to tell my husband,” recalled Claudia, who worried that he would be left a widower grappling with loneliness.

But when she broke the grim news to her husband, Claudia said he calmed her fears and reassured her that she would be “okay.”

Claudia underwent breast reconstruction surgery that was beset by complications. After having a double mastectomy, she opted for a DIEP-flap. The procedure moves fatty tissue, blood vessels and skin from a person’s lower abdomen to the chest to reconstruct a breast. While she was in recovery following the first phase of her nine-hour surgery, the newly transplanted blood vessels collapsed. “Within 24 hours, I had three surgeries lasting a total of 13 hours,” Claudia recalled.

Fortunately, the procedure was successful and Claudia did not require chemotherapy or radiation. Through it all, she says her husband was her “biggest source of strength. He knew how to calm my fears without ever showing his to me.”

Nine years later, she is cancer-free and eager to encourage women to take breast cancer detection seriously. Claudia, who has no family history of the disease says, “Just because breast cancer doesn’t run in your family, doesn’t mean you can’t get it.”

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