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Lobe Sciences Announces Launch of Preclinical Study in Collaboration with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

(MENAFN – Newsfile Corp) Lobe Sciences Announces Launch of Preclinical Study in Collaboration with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Vancouver, British Columbia–(Newsfile Corp. – November 30, 2020) – Lobe Sciences Ltd. (CSE: LOBE) (OTC Pink: GTSIF) (” Lobe ” or the ” Company “) is pleased to announce the launch of preclinical research studies using psilocybin and N-Acetylcysteine (” NAC “) for the treatment of mild traumatic brain injury/concussion (” mTBI “) with post-traumatic stress disorder (” PTSD “). The study is in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of scientists and physicians at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine under the lead of Michael E. Hoffer, M.D., professor of otolaryngology and neurological surgery.

NAC has been shown to be safe and efficacious in a phase I human clinical study in treating military personnel who had suffered mTBI. The initial research focus is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the combination of psilocybin and NAC using broadly accepted rodent models. Final results are expected in 2021. Once this is established, more specific work can examine dose response, medicine uptake, and medicine levels. The research team at the Miller School of Medicine has conducted prior studies involving NAC with mTBI and has a license from the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to conduct research using Schedule I controlled substances, which includes psilocybin.

The Miller School of Medicine is an internationally recognized leader in medical research, ranked No. 39 among the top medical schools in the nation by Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research. In 2019, the medical school submitted 1,968 research proposals and was awarded $149 million in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Advances in neuro-diagnostic assessment have revealed mild traumatic brain injury (concussion) is more common than previously thought and potentially associated with a host of negative health outcomes. The Centers for Disease Control (” CDC “) estimates that there are 3 million emergency room visits and over 230,000 hospitalizations due to TBI in any given year in the United States alone. Also, at the same time there are 5.3 million Americans living with the effects of mTBI (a 53% increase over ten years ago). The World Health Organization calls traumatic brain injury a “silent epidemic” that affects over 70 million individuals across the world. The United States Department of Defense estimates that over 345,000 individuals are affected by mTBI and that 20% of all service members who deploy suffer mTBI. mTBI and PTSD are significant health care issues that often co-occur and impact each other.

Dr. Hoffer, the principal investigator on the study, said, “This a very important extension of our work with NAC and other medicines to identify new treatments for mTBI and PTSD. We are hopeful that this new combination of psilocybin with NAC will lead us to better solutions for those suffering from mTBI and/or PTSD.”

Maghsoud Dariani, Chief Science Officer of Lobe said, “We are very excited to begin the preclinical studies in collaboration with Dr.

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Ionis announces AstraZeneca’s initiation of the Phase 2b clinical study of its antisense medicine targeting PCSK9 to lower LDL-cholesterol | News

CARLSBAD, Calif., Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: IONS) today announced that the biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca has initiated a Phase 2b clinical trial of ION449 (AZD8233), an investigational antisense medicine designed to reduce blood cholesterol levels in patients with dyslipidemia by targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), an important regulator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). PCSK9 is an enzyme that controls the number of LDL receptors on the surface of cells. People with genetic variations that reduce PCSK9 function have lower LDL-C levels in the blood and a lower risk for major cardiovascular events. ION449 is a LIgand Conjugated Antisense (LICA) medicine being developed by AstraZeneca as part of a collaboration between Ionis and AstraZeneca.

The Phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will enroll approximately 108 participants, aged 18-75, who have LDL-C levels between 70 and 190 mg/dL and are receiving moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy as defined by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines on blood cholesterol management. The primary objective is to assess the effect of different doses of ION449 on LDL-C compared to placebo at Week 12 in patients taking baseline statin therapy.  The study will evaluate three dose levels of ION449 versus placebo, all administered once a month by subcutaneous injection. Safety and tolerability will be evaluated along with a number of secondary endpoints. Learn more about the trial at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04641299. 

In a Phase 1 study reported at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions on November 13, single subcutaneous doses of ION449 (AZD8233) demonstrated dose-dependent mean reductions in circulating plasma PCSK9 and LDL-C levels of >90 percent and up to 70 percent, respectively, in subjects who had a baseline LDL-C between 100 and 190 mg/dL without concomitant statin therapy. Doses up to 120 mg were evaluated. ION449 was observed to be safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels. 

“Results from the Phase 1 study showed that ION449 potently reduces PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol. ION449 demonstrated best-in-class potential for PCSK9 inhibition and LDL-C reduction, supporting larger clinical trials that are now underway to further evaluate efficacy and safety,” said Sotirios “Sam” Tsimikas, M.D., senior vice president, clinical development and cardiovascular franchise leader at Ionis. “The growing evidence supporting Ionis’ advanced LICA technology in cardiovascular disease holds promise for more effective approaches to lower LDL-C and to address cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide.”

Dr. Tsimikas will provide an update on Ionis’ cardiovascular programs during Ionis’ Virtual Investor Day, Dec. 7, 2020, beginning at 12 p.m. EST.

Ionis earned a milestone payment of $20 million from AstraZeneca for the Phase 2b clinical trial initiation of ION449. Ionis and AstraZeneca are collaborating on potential treatments for kidney disease, cardiometabolic disease and cancer.

About Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

As the leader in RNA-targeted drug discovery and development, Ionis has created an efficient, broadly applicable, drug discovery platform called antisense technology that can treat diseases where no other therapeutic approaches have proven effective. Our

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medicine

Study and Editorial on Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS) Published in The Journal of Investigative Medicine (JIM)

BEVERLY, Mass., Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The December issue of The Journal of Investigative Medicine (JIM), the journal of the American Federation for Medical Research (AFMR), is publishing both a study and editorial on the important topic of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS).

The research is entitled Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: Definition, Pathophysiology, Clinical Spectrum, Insights into Acute and Long-Term Management.

The Study: Although cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) was first reported more than 15 years ago, it still remains an unfamiliar clinical entity among physicians worldwide. With the legalization of marijuana in many states, CHS will become an increasingly prevalent clinical entity, so educating about CHS is an important goal, particularly for emergency department physicians who generally first encounter these patients.

Authors: Mahesh Gajendran MD, Joshua Sifuentes, MD, Mohammad Bashashati, MD and Richard McCallum, MD of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso.

The editorial, Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: The Conundrum Is Here to Stay, is authored by Ron Schey, MD, University of Florida Health, Jacksonville.

Other December highlights include:

  • Review: Advances in the management of atrial fibrillation with a special focus on nonpharmacological approaches to prevent thromboembolism: A review of current recommendations.
    Authors: Harsha S. Nagarajarao, MD, Richard McCallum, MD, Chandra Prakash Ojha, MD, Adriana Camila Mares, MD and Ahmed Ibrahim, MD of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso; Malini Riddle, MD of Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso; Timir Kumar Paul, MD of East Tennessee State University; Vineet Gupta, MD of University of California San Diego; David Alan Baran, MD of Sentara Healthcare; Bharat Ved Prakash, MD of Texas Tech University Health University Health Sciences Center El Paso, Transmountain Campus; Amogh Misra, MD of The University of Texas at Austin; Moeen Abedin, MD and Venkatachalam Mulukutla, MD of University Medical Center of El Paso; Archana Kedar, MD of University of Louisville School of Medicine.

About the Journal of Investigative Medicine: The Journal of Investigative Medicine (JIM) is the official publication of the American Federation for Medical Research. The journal is peer-reviewed and publishes high-quality original articles and reviews in the areas of basic, clinical, and translational medical research.

About the American Federation for Medical Research: The American Federation for Medical Research (AFMR) is an international, multidisciplinary association of scientists engaged in all areas of biomedical and patient-oriented research — from the laboratory to translational to clinical. It works to foster the development of future generations of clinical scientists and investigators through its own initiatives, as well as encouraging public, private, and governmental investment in the development of these individuals.

SOURCE AFMR

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UChicago Medicine and UIC researchers to study expanded access to rapid COVID-19 testing

Researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) are launching an investigational study to determine the effects of increased education and access to rapid, FDA-approved COVID-19 testing on community perceptions, access, and use of COVID-19 testing resources.

The study will be funded by $2M in support from the National Institutes for Health RADx-UP program. A part of the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative, the RADx Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program supports research that aims to better understand COVID-19 testing patterns among underserved and vulnerable populations; strengthen the data on disparities in infection rates, disease progression and outcomes; and develop strategies to reduce the disparities in COVID-19 testing.

The research will be led by Ayman Al-Hendy, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UChicago Medicine, and Renee Taylor, PhD, professor of occupational therapy and Nahed Ismail MD, PhD, D(ABMM), D(ABMLI), professor of pathology and medical director of clinical microbiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The investigators plan to leverage existing university-community partnerships and expertise in clinical microbiology, community engagement, and epidemiological infrastructures to expand access to rapid COVID-19 testing.

“There are testing deserts in Chicago, where many people don’t have easy or affordable access to testing,” said Taylor. “We can reach individuals who maybe don’t have health insurance or are concerned about having a COVID-19 test on their medical record and provide them with an easy and private opportunity to get tested.”

The project includes collaboration with community members to co-create advertisements to recruit other participants into the trial as well as a mobile health web app, called the mHealth Literacy and Outreach Suite, that will allow individuals to not only privately order testing, but also learn how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and care for themselves if they fall ill.

Investigators are also sending out kits so participants can collect their own samples and send them to be tested at UIC. Sample collection can be performed rapidly at home with a nasal swab, without the discomfort of the typical nasopharyngeal swab, before sending the sample to the central lab for testing.

The team hopes that the privacy offered by these options, as well as the community advocacy, will help improve the public perception of receiving a COVID-19 test.

“Many people don’t trust the test, are concerned about the expense, or are worried that they’ll be forced out of work or forced to isolate if they have a positive test, which is creating a lot of stigma,” said Ismail. “We need to expand our testing in a community setting where people have some privacy, and the mHealth Suite provides that, as well as overcoming issues of cost.”

Al-Hendy credits the skills of the interdisciplinary team and their pooled community networks for making this collaborative effort possible. “The collaboration between UIC and UChicago Medicine will allow this project to reach many underserved populations,” he said. “Our two institutions already both have robust relationships within our local communities, which will help expand the

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fitness

Large study finds clear association between fitness and mental health

New research from a large study demonstrates that low cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength have a significant association with worse mental health.

Researchers have reported a clear link between low physical fitness and the risk of experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, or both.

The study, which included more than 150,000 participants, found that cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength independently contribute to a greater risk of worse mental health.

However, the researchers saw the most significant association when they looked at cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength in combination.

The research, which appears in the journal BMC Medicine, may help inform clinical guidance on mental health and physical fitness.

Problems with mental health, just like physical health issues, can have a significant negative effect on a person’s life. Two of the more common mental health conditions are anxiety and depression.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 18.1% of adults in the United States have experienced an anxiety disorder in the past year. In addition, the National Institute of Mental Health note that 7.1% of U.S. adults have had a major depressive episode.

There is growing evidence that being physically active may help prevent or treat mental health conditions. However, many questions still need answering.

For example, what measures should researchers use to quantify physical activity? In what ways can it prevent mental health issues or improve a person’s mental health? And is it possible to demonstrate a causal link between physical activity and better mental health?

It is important to have detailed evidence of the relationship between physical activity and mental health, as well as the mechanisms that might underlie it. With this information, clinicians can offer more targeted guidance to people with mental health conditions.

To begin to answer some of these questions, a team of researchers analyzed an existing large dataset that allowed them to build on their understanding of the association between physical fitness and mental health.

In the present study, the researchers drew on data from the U.K. Biobank — a data repository comprising information from more than 500,000 volunteers aged 40–69 years from England, Wales, and Scotland.

Between August 2009 and December 2010, a subset of the U.K. Biobank participants — amounting to 152,978 participants — underwent tests to measure their fitness.

Investigators assessed the participants’ cardiorespiratory fitness by monitoring their heart rate before, during, and after a 6-minute submaximal exercise test on a stationary bicycle.

They also measured the volunteers’ grip strength, which the researchers of the present study used as a proxy for muscle strength.

Alongside these physical fitness tests, the participants completed two standard clinical questionnaires relating to anxiety and depression to give the researchers an overview of their mental health.

After 7 years, the researchers assessed each person’s anxiety and depression again using the same two clinical questionnaires.

In their analysis, the researchers accounted for potential confounding factors, such as age, natal sex, previous mental health issues, smoking status, income level, physical activity, educational experience, parental depression, and diet.

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COVID-19 and aspirin: Can this common drug in your medicine cabinet reduce your risk of dying from COVID? Here’s what a new study found

At least 29 million Americans take low-dose aspirin every day in hopes of preventing a heart attack or stroke.

Now, a new University of Maryland study found that hospitalized COVID-19 patients, who were taking a daily 81-milligram dose of aspirin, had a significantly lower risk of complications than those not taking aspirin.

“Forty percent across the board did not require a ventilator, did not need to go to the ICU,” explained Dr. Michael Daignault, an ER physician at Providence St. Joseph Hospital.

MORE: Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine could be up to 94.5% effective

Dr. Daignault says aspirin’s ability to reduce blood clots may be the key.

“We know that aside from being a respiratory virus, that COVID-19 at the local organ level causes a lot of mini clots,” Dr. Daignault said.

Clotting and inflammation is what sends many patients into the ICU.

So during this pandemic, should everyone be taking daily baby aspirin? Dr. Daignault says this was a small correlation study and without more research, he would not advise it.

“It’s hard to say if they got better because of the aspirin specifically or because of other reasons,” Dr. Daignault explained.

MORE: People with blood type O may have lower risk of COVID-19, studies suggest

A Harvard study found more than six million Americans are taking aspirin without a doctor’s advice or knowledge. Experts say for people who don’t have severe cardiovascular issues, the risks may outweigh the potential benefits.

“Aspirin can raise your risk of having gastritis or irritation of your stomach lining or a ulcer or an upper gastrointestinal bleed,” Dr. Daignault said.

If you’re thinking about taking a daily baby aspirin for any health reason, it’s important that you discuss this with your doctor first.

“Aspirin is cheap, it’s widely available, and it could be a potential game changer, but we definitely need more perspective or robust studies,” Dr. Daignault said.

RELATED | Which masks protect those around you best? Researchers weigh in

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Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers receive $5 million NIH grant to study HIV and HPV cancers in Africa

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IMAGE: Kathryn Anastos, M.D.
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Credit: Albert Einstein College of Medicine

November 13, 2020–(BRONX, NY)–A team of scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received a five-year, $4.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish a research center to investigate HIV- and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers in Africa.

The HIV-Associated HPV-related Malignancies Research Center will build on Einstein-led efforts that have already improved research, clinical, and laboratory capacity in Rwanda. More than 200,000 people in Rwanda have HIV, and women have a higher burden of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, cervical cancer, which is caused by HPV and which women with HIV are at greater risk of developing, is one of the two most common malignancies among Rwandan women. HPV is also linked to the development of anal, penile, and head and neck cancers.

The grant will enable Einstein researchers and their partners to expand the Rwandan programs and launch similar initiatives in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). These efforts will help improve health outcomes for millions of Africans living with HIV whose incidence of diseases, including cancer, is increasing as they live longer due to effective HIV therapies.

“We aim to develop a cadre of Rwandan and DRC scientific leaders and build the necessary physical and administrative infrastructure to launch and sustain this project,” said Kathryn Anastos, M.D., lead investigator on the grant and a member of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center, which has supported previous work in Rwanda, including efforts to bring Rwandans to the United States to train.

“Our new NIH-funded center in Africa will serve as a national and regional resource hub for research, training, and career development for those studying the epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of HPV-associated malignancies in people living with HIV,” added Dr. Anastos, who is professor of medicine, of epidemiology & population health, and of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein and an internist at Montefiore Health System.

Dr. Anastos is recognized internationally for her clinical and investigative work in HIV-infected women, and she has long been involved in leading complex multi-faceted research projects in the United States and Rwanda. Other principal investigators on the grant are Adebola Adedimeji, Ph.D., M.B.A., research associate professor of epidemiology & population heath, and Marcel Yotebieng, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of medicine, both from Einstein, and Leon Mutesa, M.D., Ph.D., professor of human genetics and director of the Center for Human Genetics at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences-University of Rwanda. The Einstein team includes more than a dozen other faculty members from a range of departments and specialties, including several from the Albert Einstein Cancer Center. They will partner with three African institutions: University of Rwanda, Rwanda Military Hospital, and Université Protestante au Congo.

The grant will support two research projects. One is the first population-based assessment of the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in women living with HIV. The study also will compare the HPV

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fitness

Fitness Equipment Market Research Study including Growth Factors, Types and Application by regions from 2020 to 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 10, 2020 (Heraldkeepers) —
The report scope includes detailed competitive outlook covering market shares and profiles key participants in the global Fitness Equipment market share. Major industry players with significant revenue share include Johnson Health Tech, Nautilus Inc., Technogym S.p.A., Torque Fitness, True Fitness, Brunswick Corporation, Core Health & Fitness LLC, Fitness EM, LLC, HOIST Fitness Systems, Icon Health and Fitness, and others.

FYI, You will get latest updated report as per the COVID-19 Impact on this industry. Our updated reports will now feature detailed analysis that will help you make critical decisions.

Browse Full Report from Here: https://www.marketresearchengine.com/fitness-equipment-market-report

Market Research Engine has published a new report titled as “Fitness Equipment Market Size by Distribution Channel (Offline Store, Online Store), By Protective Equipment Type Barriers (Weight Training, Cardiovascular Training), By End Use (Health Clubs, Other Commercial Organizations, Individual), By Region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Rest of the World), Market Analysis Report, Forecast 2019-2026”.

Increase in obesity rates mainly in urban population across the world has occasioned in improved health and fitness awareness among consumers. To prevent like diseases, people are increasingly concentrating on their fitness and wellness, driving the fitness equipment market demand in residential and commercial applications. Medical concerns have an impact on the mortality rate. At the global level, a rise in the health issues of cholesterol, diabetes, and heart-related problems is being perceived. Keeping oneself physically fit can be measured as one of the best precautions to eradicate or avoid the risks of certain diseases. Fitness training centers have observed a spontaneous growth, owing to the number of health issues encountered in today’s world. The growth in the number of fitness centers across the world has created a rise in demand for fitness equipment and this demand is anticipated to produce in the coming years. Treadmills, stationary bicycles, weightlifting machines are some of the most common fitness equipment preferred by consumers for cardiovascular fitness and muscle building.

The global Fitness Equipment market is segregated on the basis of Distribution Channel as Offline Store and Online Store. Based on Protective Equipment Type Barriers the global Fitness Equipment market is segmented in Weight Training and Cardiovascular Training. Based on End Use the global Fitness Equipment market is segmented in Health Clubs, Other Commercial Organizations, and Individual

The global Fitness Equipment market report provides geographic analysis covering regions, such as North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the World. The Fitness Equipment market for each region is further segmented for major countries including the U.S., Canada, Germany, the U.K., France, Italy, China, India, Japan, Brazil, South Africa, and others.

Competitive Rivalry

Johnson Health Tech, Nautilus Inc., Technogym S.p.A., Torque Fitness, True Fitness, Brunswick Corporation, Core Health & Fitness LLC, Fitness EM, LLC, HOIST Fitness Systems, Icon Health and Fitness, and others are among the major players in the global Fitness Equipment market. The companies are involved in several growth and expansion strategies to gain a competitive

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fitness

Low fitness may increase depression and anxiety: Study

Researchers have found that people with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60 per cent greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the study published in the journal BMC Medicine.

“Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise aimed at improving different types of fitness is not only good for your physical health, but may also have mental health benefits,” said study author Aaron Kandola from University College London (UCL) in the UK.

The study involved 152,978 participants aged between 40 and 69 years.

Their baseline aerobic fitness at the start of the study period was tested by using a stationary bike the increasing resistance, while their       muscular fitness was measured with a grip strength test.

They also completed a questionnaire gauging depression and anxiety  symptoms.

Seven years later they were tested again for       depression and anxiety    symptoms, and the researchers found that high aerobic and muscular fitness at the start of the study was associated with better mental health seven years later.

People with the lowest combined aerobic and muscular fitness had 98 per cent higher odds of depression, 60 per cent higher odds of anxiety, and 81 per cent higher odds of having either one of the common mental health disorders, compared to those with high levels of overall   fitness.

“Our findings suggest that encouraging people to exercise more could have extensive public health benefits, improving not only our physical health but our mental health too,” said study author Joseph Hayes from UCL.

Improving fitness through a combination of cardio exercise and strength and resistance training appears to be more beneficial than just focusing on aerobic or muscular fitness, according to the study.

“Other studies have found that just a few weeks of regular intensive exercise can make substantial improvements to aerobic and muscular fitness, so we are hopeful that it may not take much time to make a big difference to your risk of mental illness,” the authors wrote.

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New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
Children get active outside UGA’s McPhaul Child Development Lab. Credit: Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise—not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests—such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch— were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI
Physical activity during PE in school is a good indicator of students’ activity after school, according to new research. Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation—whether the child wanted to participate in PE—nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids
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