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Star Trek-inspired personalized medicine is on the horizon | Opinion

This article is part of an op-ed series on engineering fields that will change the world by Rutgers School of Engineering faculty.

By Umer Hassan

Real-world innovations – from submarines to self-driving cars – come straight from imaginary worlds of science fiction. Think Star Trek’s handheld tricorder, a medical diagnostic device that made its first appearance in the original TV series. This sci-fi precursor is now changing the face of personalized medicine by taking the tricorder concept to the next level.

Today, diabetics can anticipate a biosensor able to monitor their glucose levels through perspiration. A biosensor implant could detect genetic mutations as they happen, while British researchers are developing a wearable biosensor that will collect data and assess the efficacy of rehabilitation equipment and exercise.

Other biosensors will be able to quickly and inexpensively detect costly and potentially fatal medical conditions such as sepsis and AIDS. Together with Rutgers University colleagues, clinical and industry partners, my lab has been working to solve these global health challenges with new tools that focus on a highly personalized approach to medicine. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, we are also hoping to apply this technology to fight the coronavirus.

Sepsis – the body’s life-threatening response to infection – is not only deadly, it is the most expensive inpatient medical condition in the United States, with patients who develop sepsis often spending days in intensive care units at a cost of $10,000 a day – or more. Recognizing that sepsis is responsible for as many as 6 million largely preventable deaths a year, the World Health Organization has identified the prevention, diagnosis and management of sepsis as a pressing global health priority.

By applying electrical and computer engineering skills to identify new biomarkers and devise machine-learning algorithms, or artificial intelligence systems, we hope to dramatically improve clinicians’ abilities to diagnose, predict – and ultimately manage – sepsis. Simply reacting to diseases is no longer enough – we need to predict them in order to treat patients in a much smarter way.

To this end, we are building an inexpensive medical device that even minimally trained health care providers can use to accurately diagnosis sepsis. This automated device would cost less than $10 a test and be simple to operate not only in resource-limited settings but anywhere where a rapidly confirmed diagnosis of sepsis is needed.

In sub-Saharan Africa, where only one person in eight is even tested for HIV, many of those infected go undetected until they develop severe complications from the disease. In the near future, cheap, disposable biosensors that are as easy and convenient to use as a home pregnancy test, will detect infections with people living with HIV/AIDS in underdeveloped sub-Saharan African nations. A secondary goal is to develop sensors able to monitor a patient’s response to the antiretroviral therapy they receive.

The positive health and economic impact of such sensors would be felt not only in underdeveloped nations, but also in the United States by reducing the cost of a

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medicine

Ex-lacrosse star Delby Powless writes about mental health in novel ‘Medicine Game’

Writing a novel is one of the hardest — but most cathartic — things former pro lacrosse player Delby Powless has ever done.

“Medicine Game” centres on Tommy Henry as he struggles with violent outbursts and addiction on the fictional Sparrow Lake Nation. Powless said that he wrote the novel as a way to open up about his own mental health struggles and pay tribute to friends he’s lost.

“This was by the most therapeutic thing I’ve ever done,” said Powless. “It was really emotional to write about this stuff, not just because of my own things but because I was thinking about people that have passed, that aren’t with us anymore.”

Powless, who won the Tom Longboat Award as Canada’s top Indigenous athlete in 2003, spent his entire six-year career in the National Lacrosse League with the Buffalo Bandits. He played all levels of his junior and senior lacrosse for teams in Six Nations of the Grand River, Ont., and represented the Iroquois Nationals in international competition.

Even with his success as a lacrosse player, Powless said he struggled with his mental health and opening up to friends and teammates.

That began to change when Powless read “Playing With Fire,” a memoir by former NHLer Theo Fleury. Powless said Fleury’s memoir made him realize he was not alone and that opening up could help him and his readers.

“This was my way of coming out to let people know what I’ve gone through mental-health wise,” the 40-year-old Powless said. “I had kept stuff inside of me for 30, 35 years.”

In the short time “Medicine Game” has been out, Powless said he’s received a lot of positive feedback, especially from other Indigenous men, who have told him it’s encouraged them to be more open.

“They bought it because they thought it was about lacrosse and they start reading it and they start realizing how it’s about the rez and the mental health stuff and the history of residential schools and other things they could relate to,” said Powless.

Lacrosse was played by the Haudenosaunee — known in French as the Iroquois and in English as the Six Nations — thousands of years before Europeans arrived in North America. Sometimes called the Creator’s Game or the Medicine Game, many First Nations people believe that playing lacrosse can heal them spiritually and physically.

Powless, who is now a child and youth counselor in the Six Nations community, said that the camaraderie he — and his protagonist — feels when playing lacrosse is an experience he wanted to convey to his readers.

“When I was going through a really rough time, one of my coaches texted me that he hoped to see me back at the rink because lacrosse is good medicine,” said Powless. “That stuck with me, just to think of it that way.

“Just to get out there and be around the boys is helpful to people and their well-being.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov.

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medicine

Ex-lacrosse star Delby Powless writes about mental health in novel ‘Medicine Game’

Writing a novel is one of the hardest — but most cathartic — things former pro lacrosse player Delby Powless has ever done.

“Medicine Game” centres on Tommy Henry as he struggles with violent outbursts and addiction on the fictional Sparrow Lake Nation. Powless said that he wrote the novel as a way to open up about his own mental health struggles and pay tribute to friends he’s lost.

“This was by the most therapeutic thing I’ve ever done,” said Powless. “It was really emotional to write about this stuff, not just because of my own things but because I was thinking about people that have passed, that aren’t with us anymore.”

Powless, who won the Tom Longboat Award as Canada’s top Indigenous athlete in 2003, spent his entire six-year career in the National Lacrosse League with the Buffalo Bandits. He played all levels of his junior and senior lacrosse for teams in Six Nations of the Grand River, Ont., and represented the Iroquois Nationals in international competition.

Even with his success as a lacrosse player, Powless said he struggled with his mental health and opening up to friends and teammates.

That began to change when Powless read “Playing With Fire,” a memoir by former NHLer Theo Fleury. Powless said Fleury’s memoir made him realize he was not alone and that opening up could help him and his readers.

“This was my way of coming out to let people know what I’ve gone through mental-health wise,” the 40-year-old Powless said. “I had kept stuff inside of me for 30, 35 years.”

In the short time “Medicine Game” has been out, Powless said he’s received a lot of positive feedback, especially from other Indigenous men, who have told him it’s encouraged them to be more open.

“They bought it because they thought it was about lacrosse and they start reading it and they start realizing how it’s about the rez and the mental health stuff and the history of residential schools and other things they could relate to,” said Powless.

Lacrosse was played by the Haudenosaunee — known in French as the Iroquois and in English as the Six Nations — thousands of years before Europeans arrived in North America. Sometimes called the Creator’s Game or the Medicine Game, many First Nations people believe that playing lacrosse can heal them spiritually and physically.

Powless, who is now a child and youth counselor in the Six Nations community, said that the camaraderie he — and his protagonist — feels when playing lacrosse is an experience he wanted to convey to his readers.

“When I was going through a really rough time, one of my coaches texted me that he hoped to see me back at the rink because lacrosse is good medicine,” said Powless. “That stuck with me, just to think of it that way.

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“Just to get out there and be around the boys is helpful to people and their well-being.”

This report by The

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fitness

Man City star travels to London with squad ahead of Tottenham clash despite fitness concerns

Manchester City have been handed a boost ahead of their crunch clash against Jose Mourinho’s Tottenham on Saturday afternoon, with reports claiming Sergio Aguero has travelled to the capital with the rest of the squad, despite obvious concerns over his fitness.

The Argentine has only recently return to full first-team training, after an injury sustained in the draw at West Ham last month, however looks to have been thrusted straight back into the first-team squad, such is the importance of the upcoming Premier League clash against high-flying Spurs.

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(Photo via Man City)

According to journalist Lucas Scagliola, who appeared to have maintained an inside-track on the Argentine’s long-term injury over the summer, the 32-year-old was part of the travelling contingent that descended on the capital on Friday afternoon.

It is believed that the Argentina international only returned to first-team training over the international break, and after experience with rushing him back on previous occasions, it may come as a surprise to some that he could play some part in the weekend’s clash.

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(Photo via Man City)

Pep Guardiola will be looking to make major strides in the top-flight title race after a relatively disappointing opening few months to the campaign. However, could the Catalan boss have that ‘new-contract bounce’ following his two-year extension at the club this week?

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You can follow us for live updates here: @City_Xtra

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dentist

RTE star Lottie Ryan says she’s ‘elated’ with new smile as she shows off gorgeous teeth following trip to dentist

RTE star Lottie Ryan has revealed that she is “elated” after she showed off her gorgeous teeth following a trip to the dentist.

The radio presenter took to her Instagram stories today following her trip today to her local dentist, Merrion Road Dental.

Lottie shared a picture she took of her teeth before she went to the dentist

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Lottie shared a picture she took of her teeth before she went to the dentistCredit: Instagram
Lottie said that she is thrilled with how her teeth are now

4

Lottie said that she is thrilled with how her teeth are now Credit: Instagram
Lottie explained that two of her teeth were bothering her

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Lottie explained that two of her teeth were bothering her Credit: Instagram

She explained that she has been going to the same dentist for years and she was thrilled with today’s visit.

The Dancing With The Stars winner said that she always had a problem with two of her teeth but the dentists were able to fix it.

Speaking with her followers Lottie started off by saying: “Happy Friday everyone.

“So I’m just back from the dentist and usually I am not elated when I come home from a visit to the dentist but this time I am and I thought I would share with you why because why not?

“So I have been going to my dentist since I was a baby and then my dental practice was taken over by some young women who I have been going to for years now and they are a small practice and I just love them.”

She explained that she got her two of her teeth composite bonding and she is loving her new smile.

The presenter continued saying: “I think they are amazing and I went into them today and was saying two of my teeth were bothering me .

“She is just such a genius she did this thing called composite bonding on two of my teeth and when I say I sat up and smiled and nearly died I’m not joking.”

She added: “I feel, this is an exaggeration, I feel like I got veneers and I didn’t these are all my own and I was in and out within two hours.”

Lottie then shared a before and after snap of her teeth as she praised the dental practice more.

Speaking with her fans she said: “I am going to show you a picture I took before I went into her and a little picture now and you will see the difference.

“They’re just phenomenal I can’t recommend them enough.

“I am mad into teeth and I always have been, I think it’s probably because my granddad

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medicine

Family Medicine’s Founding Principle, and Still Its North Star — FPM

The pandemic and protests have underscored family physicians’ enduring role as a voice for patients in and out of the clinic.

Fam Pract Manag. 2020 Nov-Dec;27(6):5.

When family medicine was founded as a specialty 50 years ago, the goal was to redefine primary care. Family physicians led a transition from hospital-based, disease-focused care to a patient-centered model that championed continuity of care for entire families and emphasized care in clinics and the community. In his 1989 essay, “Family Medicine as Counterculture,” G. Gayle Stephens, MD, described the paradox of practicing medicine as part of the medical establishment, while at the same time advocating to change the establishment.1 Family medicine was born with social justice at its core and has brought that sensibility to the health care system as a whole. The result has been improved access to high-quality health care for all patients, regardless of race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, or financial circumstance.

Fifty years later, family physicians continue to be on the cutting edge of patient-centered care, while advocating strongly for patients outside of the clinic as well. The COVID-19 pandemic and racial justice protests underscore the continued need for that advocacy and provide examples of the tension of playing both roles. Where do family physicians fit in to the politicized public health debates going on across the country? How much should we take our professional personas into the personal, everyday lives we lead outside of the office?

I was thinking about those questions after a recent trip to the grocery store. As I entered the store, I asked one of the employees where I could find a handheld basket. He replied, “We won’t have those back until there is a vaccine for COVID.” I wondered how a handheld basket was different from a shopping cart. Both are touched and can be cleaned before being used by the next customer. Was it my role to point out this faulty reasoning? In this case, I held my tongue. But I certainly would not have stayed quiet if he told me that customers shouldn’t wear face coverings.

What’s the threshold? As family physicians, when and how should we choose to speak up?

The answer to that question goes back to the origins of the specialty. We are advocates for our patients, whether or not we share their political beliefs. There are various levels of advocacy, ranging from personal support (e.g., completing a disabled parking permit application for a patient) to policy support (e.g., advocating that patients have access to affordable health insurance).2 But family physicians are obliged to engage in advocacy at all levels to support our patients and their families. Advocating for policies that support the health of our patients is no longer countercultural; it is inherent to our roles as family physicians.

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fitness

Tottenham star Steven Bergwijn axed from Holland squad over fitness issues as internationals are decimated by pull-outs

STEVEN BERGWIJN has returned to Tottenham from Holland’s training camp over fitness issues.

The forward arrived at the camp on Monday and was assessed by medics from the Dutch side.

Steven Bergwijn has withdrawn from international duty

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Steven Bergwijn has withdrawn from international dutyCredit: EPA

Bergwijn, 23, was declared ‘not fit enough’ to participate in the triple header of matches and was sent back to North London.

A statement from the national side read: “The Tottenham Hotspur attacker was examined by Orange’s medical staff on arrival in Zeist on Monday.

“It turned out that he is not fit enough and will miss the next Orange matches.”

Holland play Spain in a friendly on Wednesday before Nations League clashes against Bosnia and Herzegovina and Poland.

He has only started one Prem game and one Europa League clash this season as he struggles to regain match fitness.

Bergwijn suffered a ‘significant sprain’ to his left ankle in March but returned in June when the season restarted.

He is just the latest name to pull out of international duty as the fixture pile-up takes it toll.

Arsenal’s Thomas Partey is out after coming off injured at half-time in the 3-0 defeat to Aston Villa.

Aaron Ramsey, Victor Lindelof, James Ward-Prowse and Trent Alexander-Arnold are also missing out.

It comes after Jurgen Klopp and Pep Guardiola hit out at chiefs for failing to protect players.

Clubs voted against changing the rules to allow five subs at the beginning of the campaign.

Guardiola said: “We talked about five substitutions. If people want to give microphones so we can give our opinions…

“There are many guys with many, many cases. Around the world five subs are key, but here it’s totally the opposite. We’ve talked about this many times.

“Trent Alexander-Arnold, international English player, now injured. Here we believe we are more special, we don’t protect the players, so that is why it is a disaster.

“I don’t understand how the Premier League don’t understand the situation. Maybe it is because this league likes to be different. 

“All the other leagues protect the players with five. Today it was the right-back for that reason, tomorrow it will be other players.

“The previous season finished later and the situation is exceptional. All the other leagues understand.”

Jose Mourinho wipes new shoes with towel and dances in bizarre Instagram video

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fitness

Tottenham star Steven Bergwijn sent home from international duty with Holland due to fitness issues

Tottenham star Steven Bergwijn sent home from international duty with Holland due to ‘fitness issues’ – despite playing for Spurs last week in Europa League victory away at Ludogorets

  • Steven Bergwijn was called up to the Dutch national team by Frank de Boer
  • He has now already been sent home by Holland coaches due to ‘fitness issues’
  • The midfielder played for Tottenham away at Ludogorets on Thursday night
  • Holland have games against Spain, Bosnia and Poland in the coming days 

Steven Bergwijn has returned to Tottenham without playing a minute of football for Holland in the international break after coaches deemed him not fit enough for action – despite him playing for Spurs last week.

The midfielder has dropped down the pecking order slightly under Mourinho, seeing his game-time limited in recent weeks, but he has played in both of Spurs’ most recent Europa League games, starting in Antwerp and coming on at Ludogorets.

He was called up by the Dutch national team for their upcoming fixtures, but is now already back in London after being sent home for fitness issues.

Steven Bergwijn has been sent home from Holland duty this week due to fitness issues

Steven Bergwijn has been sent home from Holland duty this week due to fitness issues

The Tottenham midfielder played as recently as last Thursday in the Europa League

The Tottenham midfielder played as recently as last Thursday in the Europa League

In a statement from the Dutch FA, it was confirmed: ‘Steven Bergwijn has left the training camp of the Dutch national team. The Tottenham Hotspur attacker was examined by the medical staff of Oranje on Monday, upon arrival in Zeist. 

‘It turned out that he is not fit enough and that the Oranje matches must pass by.

‘National coach Frank de Boer is not calling for a replacement, so the selection of the Dutch national team now consists of 24 players.’

Bergwijn started against Royal Antwerp the week before, but isn't fit enough for Holland

Bergwijn started against Royal Antwerp the week before, but isn’t fit enough for Holland

Bergwijn (centre) trains with Spurs last week - he has dropped down the pecking order slightly

Bergwijn (centre) trains with Spurs last week – he has dropped down the pecking order slightly

Holland play Spain on Wednesday night, before Nations League matches against Bosnia & Herzegovina and Poland.

They will now have to contend those three matches without one of their more impressive midfield stars, with Bergwijn having to watch on TV instead.

The 23-year-old did suffer a hamstring injury just before the coronavirus shutdown last season, and there are concerns that he still hasn’t quite shaken that off.

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fitness

Christian Pulisic’s fitness ‘day to day,’ says USMNT coach as Chelsea star battles hamstring injury

Christian Pulisic’s fitness is “day to day,” according to U.S. Men’s National Team coach Gregg Berhalter.

The winger has only made five appearances for Chelsea this season after suffering a fresh injury setback shortly after his return from a long-term layoff.

Pulisic pulled up with a hamstring issue during the warmup before Chelsea’s 3-0 win away to Burnley at the end of October. He had previously been out for around two months after tearing his hamstring in the FA Cup final defeat to Arsenal, in which Pulisic scored the opening goal.

DeCOURCY: Berhalter showing unexpected gift for recruiting

The current international break sees the USMNT play its first fixtures since February, with friendly games against Wales and Panama.

Pulisic joined up with Berhalter’s squad for the games despite his lack of fitness, and the coach has praised his commitment to the cause.

“Christian is in camp and is listed as day to day,” Berhalter told Fox Sports. “It really says a lot about Christian that he wasn’t playing for Chelsea but he wanted to come into this camp and be around the team and his status is day to day.”

Former Chelsea left back Ashley Cole said he expects Pulisic to give manager Frank Lampard “a good dilemma” once he is back to full fitness.

Pulisic starred at the end of last season and, with Hakim Ziyech, Kai Havertz and Timo Werner finding their feet in the Premier League, things are looking up at Stamford Bridge.

Meanwhile, Berhalter was also pleased to welcome Juventus midfielder Weston McKennie back to the squad, though he won’t have Josh Sargent at his disposal for the upcoming games.

Sargent was not permitted to leave for international duty by his club Werder Bremen, citing Germany’s current coronavirus restrictions. That had led to some concern that McKennie, who recovered from Covid-19 after testing positive in October, might also struggle to link up with his international teammates.

“With Weston, we were able to get him out of Italy and the situation is changing by the hour,” Berhalter said. “Josh Sargent wasn’t able to join the team but Weston is able to come.”

The USMNT will be looking to hit form before its 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign begins in the new year.

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fitness

Alex Morgan: Tottenham star says she needs WSL game time to regain match fitness

World Cup winner Alex Morgan said regaining match fitness will take time after making her much-awaited debut for Tottenham in Saturday’s 1-1 Women’s Super League draw with Reading.

The United States forward came on with 20 minutes left but could not inspire Spurs to a first WSL win of the season.

Morgan joined in September, but has had to wait to return to action, having only given birth to a daughter in May.

“It feels good to be back for the first time in more than a year,” she said.

The 31-year-old told the Tottenham website:external-link “I am hoping to get much more time next match and the remaining matches to keep building.

“My fitness is getting back there. It will just take a little bit of time. I have to get minutes to get game fit.

“I felt like there was definitely a lot more sprints than in training. I will get used to it pretty quickly, but it was more of a transition game.

“I am looking forward to getting in to more of the game to settle in a little bit better.”

Tottenham remain in ninth place after two draws and four defeats so far. On Saturday, they went behind to a 13th-minute Brooke Chaplen goal but Ashleigh Neville equalised before half-time with a header from a corner.

“Going down 1-0 was disappointing, but getting the goal back from a set-piece was important,” added Morgan, who is a two-time World Cup winner and was part of the USA squad that took gold at the 2012 Olympics in London.

“I don’t think we had enough chances to put ourselves ahead but we will work on that.

“Obviously I am not too happy about the result, but I had to start to get some minutes and build from there so I am pretty happy this is a good starting point.”

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