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Specialdocs Informs and Inspires at Concierge Medicine Industry’s Signature Event Nov. 12th

“This year has exposed the vulnerabilities of traditional fee-for-service practices in ways we could never have foreseen,” says Bauer. “And 2020 has also underscored the resilience and rewards of the Specialdocs model of personalized medicine and inspired rising numbers of physicians to consider this beneficial alternative for themselves and their patients. At this pivotal point in American healthcare, we are privileged to share with Concierge Medicine Forum attendees our collective experience and first-person stories of transformation from our network of dedicated doctors.”

Michael Tetreault, CMF organizer and editor of Concierge Medicine Today, says: “The virtual format enables us to host a more diverse gathering of healthcare professionals than ever before, and offer 24/7 on-demand access to insights from the industry’s most creative minds. We’re thrilled to feature groups like Specialdocs, pioneers and continual innovators in the concierge medicine space.”  

Specialdocs will be featured at events including: (all ET)

Thursday, Nov. 12th Pre-conference workshop

  • Concierge Medicine: is it right for you, your patients, and your market?” T Bauer 10:40 – 11:35 AM 
  • Physician Perspectives Panel. Special Doc Morris Hasson, MD, California, discusses the rewards and challenges of his transition to concierge medicine. 2:40-3:40 PM
  • “Group Concierge Medicine: Does it Work?” Special Docs Natasha Beauvais, MD; Cecily Havert, MD; Ken Zweig, MD, Northern Virginia Family Practice Associates. 2 PM

Friday, Nov. 13th

  • “Cutting Through the Fog: What a Medical Practice Will Look Like for Traditional Fee-for-Service and Concierge Physicians for the Foreseeable Future” T Bauer. 2-3 PM
  • “Social Media for Doctors Made Simple: What are You Putting into the World” Special Doc Uday Jani, MD, integrative concierge medicine, Shoreview Personalized Care, Delaware. 4-5 pm

After 2 pm

  • “Lifestyle Medicine in a Concierge Practice” Special Doc Dorothy Serna, MD, North Cypress Internal Medicine & Wellness, Texas
  • “Lessons Learned: Challenges and Physician Satisfaction Years Later” Special Doc Dominick Curatola, MD, cardiac concierge medicine, California

Saturday, Nov. 14th

  • “Concierge Physician Lifecycle: From Exhaustion to Exhilaration to Exit” T Bauer  2 PM
  • “Restoring the Balance: Physician’s Guide to the New World Ahead of Us” Uday Jani, MD  3-4 pm

Since 2002, concierge medicine transition and management experts Specialdocs Consultants have helped physicians nationwide transform their practices with a uniquely customized and sustainable concierge model.

Contact: Mindy Kolof, [email protected]

SOURCE Specialdocs Consultants

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Tests Show Genetic Signature of Coronavirus That Likely Infected Trump

President Trump’s illness from a coronavirus infection last month was the most significant health crisis for a sitting president in nearly 40 years. Yet little remains known about how the virus arrived at the White House and how it spread.

The administration did not take basic steps to track the outbreak, limiting contact tracing, keeping cases a secret and cutting out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The origin of the infections, a spokesman said, was “unknowable.”

But one standard public health technique may still shed some light: tracking the cluster’s genetic fingerprints.

To better understand the outbreak, The Times worked with prominent geneticists to determine the genetic sequence of viruses that infected two Times journalists believed to been exposed to the coronavirus as part of their work covering the White House.

The study reveals, for the first time, the genetic sequence of the virus that may have infected President Trump and dozens of others, researchers said. That genome is a crucial clue that may allow researchers to identify where the outbreak originated and whether it went on to infect others across the country.

The White House has not disclosed any effort to conduct similar genetic testing, but the study’s results show that it is still possible, even weeks after positive tests. Additional sequencing could help establish the path of the virus through the White House, the role of a possible super-spreading event for Judge Amy Coney Barrett and the origin of an outbreak among the staff of Vice President Mike Pence in the last week or so.

The journalists, Michael D. Shear and Al Drago, both had significant, separate exposure to White House officials in late September, several days before they developed symptoms. They did not spend any time near each other in the weeks before their positive tests.

Mr. Shear traveled with Mr. Trump and other staff on Air Force One on Sept. 26, when Mr. Trump approached within five or six feet without a mask. Mr. Drago covered the Judge Barrett event that day and a news conference the next day near officials who were not wearing masks and later tested positive.

The viral genomes of the two journalists shared the same distinct pattern of mutations, the research found. Along with their exposure history, the findings suggest that they were infected as part of the broader White House outbreak, said Trevor Bedford, a geneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington who led the research team.

“These mutations that are possessed by these viruses are quite rare in the United States,” Dr. Bedford said. “I am highly convinced that these viruses come from the same outbreak or cluster based on their genomes.”

The study, which has been posted online but not yet peer reviewed or published in a science journal, followed academic protocols that require genetic samples to be anonymous. Mr. Shear and Mr. Drago chose to disclose their identities for this article.

Viruses constantly mutate, picking up tiny, accidental alterations

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Earthshaking Signature ‘Brawn Songs’ and Movement, Developed over Time, Identify Seals

In the ferocious arena of a northern elephant seal colony, where few males ever get to mate, jostling suitors often face bloody battles over access to groups of females. And these boisterous bulls have a dramatic way of making their presence known to rivals: individuals identify themselves via rhythmic, guttural calls, accompanied by body slams that literally shake the ground around them.

Now research indicates that the seals are not born with these identifying signals. Rather they develop their unique brands of vocal bravado as they age, according to a recent paper published in Animal Behaviour.

The researchers recorded more than 440 calls from 47 male elephant seals at various stages of development in California’s Año Nuevo State Park. In this colony of 2,000 animals, a dominant male may vie with 50 top competitors—each of whom possesses his own call. These vocalizations develop around the same time as the seals carve out jealously guarded territories of about 20 square meters.

Less established younger males, in contrast, are “acoustically inconspicuous” and produce short, unstructured calls. They seem to avoid standing out, which may help them gain time to mature, says lead author Caroline Casey, a graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. At around the age of eight or nine, the seals finally settle on a personal song.

“It’s really when they have a shot at reproducing and becoming socially competitive that these signature calls start to emerge,” Casey says.

The resulting recognition comes in handy, as male seals appear to listen for—and avoid—individuals who have previously bested them in fights. Instead they target their competitive energies toward bulls with whom they know they are more evenly matched.

Casey suspects that the ruthless nature of male elephant seal society is what prompts the development of individualistic vocalizations. To explore that difficult-to-prove connection, she says, she would like to also analyze seal calls from less tightly packed communities, which could be less competitive.

Luke Rendell, a biologist in the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, who was not involved in the study, agrees that this motivation is a possibility. Rival seals’ ability to acoustically differentiate themselves from one another may even be something they learn from their elders around the point of reaching sexual maturity, he suggests.

“My hunch is that there is some learning involved,” Rendell says. He praises the study for including enough data from seals in different age groups to clearly show the transition from indistinct to distinct calls: “I thought it was a really significant contribution.”

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