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dentist

Lawsuit claims video shows Bishop’s Falls guards assaulting unconscious inmate in dentist’s chair | Canada | News

An inmate at a central Newfoundland prison is filing multiple lawsuits, including against corrections officers and a Gander oral surgeon, following an incident that reportedly happened at the surgeon’s office.

The Telegram has learned the man — an inmate at Bishops Falls Corrections Centre whose name is not being made public yet — alleges he was medically sedated at the oral surgeon’s office last month, when a corrections officer was video-recorded performing a dental procedure on him.

The video is believed to have been taken by another corrections officer, while two dental assistants were in the room at one point of the procedure.

The two corrections officers, who took the inmate to the oral surgeon’s office for an undisclosed procedure, were recently escorted out of the Bishop’s Falls facility by RCMP officers, a source told The Telegram earlier this week.

On Tuesday, both the RCMP and the Justice Department turned down requests for comment.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief. With all due respect to my client. I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.”

However, when contacted by The Telegram Wednesday, St. John’s lawyer Bob Buckingham confirmed he has been retained to represent the inmate and will file the lawsuit “fairly quickly” on his behalf.

“I haven’t heard of this happening in recent times in Newfoundland,” Buckingham said.

He said the lawsuits will claim battery, assault and breach of trust against the corrections officers; professional negligence and a breach of contract against the oral surgeon and the oral surgeon’s office; breach of trust by the corrections services and the provincial government, as well as vicarious liability against the provincial government, as it is alleged to have happened while corrections officers were on duty.

Buckingham said his client was unconscious at the time of the alleged incident, having been medically sedated, and had no knowledge of what happened when he left the dentist’s office a short time later. He said he learned about it and the video later from corrections administration.

“He understands one of the corrections officers took a video of this, which made the rounds within corrections services,” said Buckingham, adding that both the corrections administration and the RCMP are in possession of the video.

Buckingham said he was appalled to hear what the inmate says happened to him.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief,” he said. “With all due respect to my client, I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances to believe, given a professional involving a dentist and corrections officers who were there for his protection, and the inmate being under medically induced sedation.

“But types of egregious breaches of trust do happen in our province,” added Buckingham, who also represents the family of Jonathan Henoche, an inmate who was killed in segregation at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in November 2019, in lawsuits against the corrections officers, the prison and the provincial government.

He said

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dentist

RTE star Lottie Ryan says she’s ‘elated’ with new smile as she shows off gorgeous teeth following trip to dentist

RTE star Lottie Ryan has revealed that she is “elated” after she showed off her gorgeous teeth following a trip to the dentist.

The radio presenter took to her Instagram stories today following her trip today to her local dentist, Merrion Road Dental.

Lottie shared a picture she took of her teeth before she went to the dentist

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Lottie shared a picture she took of her teeth before she went to the dentistCredit: Instagram
Lottie said that she is thrilled with how her teeth are now

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Lottie said that she is thrilled with how her teeth are now Credit: Instagram
Lottie explained that two of her teeth were bothering her

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Lottie explained that two of her teeth were bothering her Credit: Instagram

She explained that she has been going to the same dentist for years and she was thrilled with today’s visit.

The Dancing With The Stars winner said that she always had a problem with two of her teeth but the dentists were able to fix it.

Speaking with her followers Lottie started off by saying: “Happy Friday everyone.

“So I’m just back from the dentist and usually I am not elated when I come home from a visit to the dentist but this time I am and I thought I would share with you why because why not?

“So I have been going to my dentist since I was a baby and then my dental practice was taken over by some young women who I have been going to for years now and they are a small practice and I just love them.”

She explained that she got her two of her teeth composite bonding and she is loving her new smile.

The presenter continued saying: “I think they are amazing and I went into them today and was saying two of my teeth were bothering me .

“She is just such a genius she did this thing called composite bonding on two of my teeth and when I say I sat up and smiled and nearly died I’m not joking.”

She added: “I feel, this is an exaggeration, I feel like I got veneers and I didn’t these are all my own and I was in and out within two hours.”

Lottie then shared a before and after snap of her teeth as she praised the dental practice more.

Speaking with her fans she said: “I am going to show you a picture I took before I went into her and a little picture now and you will see the difference.

“They’re just phenomenal I can’t recommend them enough.

“I am mad into teeth and I always have been, I think it’s probably because my granddad

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medicine

Integrative Medicine Shows Benefits for Patients With MPNs

A recent survey of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms found integrative medicine interventions improved symptom burden, fatigue, depression, and improved quality of life.

For patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, integrative medicine (IM) offers a range of benefits, according to a new study of survey results, which found that the interventions improved symptom burden, fatigue, and depression, and improved quality of life (QoL).

IM approaches, which work to optimize health, QoL, and clinical outcomes, are increasingly being leveraged by both patients with cancer and cancer care providers and organizations, although there is need for more evidence-based data to guide clinical practice, particularly for hematologic malignancies.

“The treatment of MPNs has revolutionized in recent decades with the approval JAK inhibitor therapy and other targeted therapies, leading to improvements in splenomegaly, symptom burden, and even overall survival,” wrote the researchers. “Despite these advancements, the need for IM interventions to address high symptom burden and poor quality of life remain a large unmet need in the MPN patient population.”

The researchers of the current study disseminated a survey of IM among patients with MPN, with more than 800 respondents. Among the respondents, 338 had essential thrombocythemia, 188 had myelofibrosis, 315 had polycythemia vera, and 17 had other/unspecified MPN. IM interventions ranged widely, with the most common interventions including aerobic activity (51.5%), massage (28.4%), yoga (25.6%), nutrition (25.2%), and strength training (23.8%).

Both aerobic activity and strength training lowered MPN-Symptom Assessment Form (SAF) scores (33.3 vs 39.7 and 34.0 vs 37.7, respectively), indicating lower symptom burden, although they were surprisingly associated with a lower QoL. However, the researchers added the caveat that the latter association may be due to those with lower QoL are more likely to try exercise-based wellness strategies like these.

In a similar pattern, massage and support groups led to higher symptoms burden (MPN SAF-TSS mean score 40.5 vs. 35.3 and 42.3 vs. 36.0, respectively) but were associated with a higher QoL, with the researchers noting that highly symptomatic patients may be more likely to try non-pharmacologic symptom management and social support.

Decreased levels of depression were noted among patients participating in aerobic activity and strength training, as well as yoga. Aerobic activity and strength training also reaped benefits for fatigue, with patients participating in the interventions reporting lower levels of fatigue, while patients participating in massage and breathing techniques noted higher levels of fatigue.

According to the researchers, while most patients participated in some form of IM intervention, “80.2% of patients felt their integrative health needs were not heard by their healthcare provider. This underscores the importance of enhancing integrative therapy communication in our health system.”

The finding, they say, indicates “the need for more integrative medicine practitioners and more robust integration of these practitioners and modalities within standard medical care.”

Reference

Gowin K, Langlais B, Kosiorek H, et al. The SIMM study: survey of integrative medicine in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Cancer Med. Published online November 3, 2020. doi: 10.1002/cam4.3566.

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fitness

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
Children get active outside UGA’s McPhaul Child Development Lab. Credit: Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise—not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests—such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch— were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI
Physical activity during PE in school is a good indicator of students’ activity after school, according to new research. Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation—whether the child wanted to participate in PE—nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids
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health

New vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease shows potential in mice

A preclinical study has tested a new vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers found that the vaccine, which targets the beta-amyloid protein, was safe and effective in mice.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurological condition and the most common cause of dementia.

According to the latest estimates from the Alzheimer’s Association, 1 in 10 people over the age of 65 years in the U.S. have Alzheimer’s disease, and experts expect the number of people with the condition to increase as the population ages. By 2050, projections show that 13.8 million people aged 65 years and over will have Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S.

While groups around the world are working to find an effective treatment for the condition, an alternative approach is to develop a vaccine. Although they are more commonly associated with infectious diseases, vaccines can also prime the body to defend itself against other, noninfectious molecules.

In Alzheimer’s disease, scientists believe that two processes drive the progression of the disease: the buildup of plaques comprising beta-amyloid proteins between neurons in the brain and tangled knots of the tau protein within neurons.

Since the general understanding is that beta-amyloid initiates the disease process, scientists have tried to develop a vaccine against it. The hope is that the immune system recognizes and destroys the beta-amyloid before it can aggravate the cell damage that the tau protein causes.

Although scientists have developed several vaccines, translating the findings from murine models into humans while ensuring safety is notoriously challenging, and the authorities have not yet approved any vaccines for use.

Researchers need to overcome the fact that as people age, their immune system becomes less responsive. As a result, without help, they will have a lower response to a vaccine.

Scientists usually overcome this problem by adding adjuvants that kickstart and enhance the immune response. However, a potential problem is that the adjuvants overstimulate the immune system, leading to inflammation.

A new study that the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) led describes a novel therapeutic vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease, which uses the body’s own immune cells to target beta-amyloid. The study found that this approach avoided the overstimulation of the immune system that can occur due to chemical adjuvants.

The study showed effective antibody production and memory improvements in vaccinated mice, and the findings appear in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The new vaccine uses dendritic cells, which communicate with other immune cells, such as B cells and T cells, to guide the immune response.

“This therapeutic vaccine uses the body’s own immune cells to target the toxic [beta-amyloid] molecules that accumulate harmfully in the brain,” explains the senior author of the paper, Dr. Chuanhai Cao.

The dendritic cells are loaded with a modified version of beta-amyloid so that the body can detect and destroy the real thing.

“Because we use dendritic cells to generate antibodies, this vaccine can coordinate both innate and acquired immunity to potentially overcome age-related impairments of the immune system,” adds Dr. Cao.

In the

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health

CDC report shows how a Wisconsin summer retreat became a ‘superspreading’ event

A coronavirus outbreak raged through an overnight school retreat in Wisconsin during the summer, beginning with one student before ultimately infecting more than 90 percent of the teens and the counselors, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The six-week faith-based camp had required all attendees from 23 states and territories and two foreign countries to be tested and quarantined for the week prior to the retreat, which ran from July 2 to Aug. 11. However, shortly after arriving at the camp, a ninth grader who had tested negative for the virus at home developed symptoms including a sore throat, cough and chills. The student was then given a PCR test which came back positive, the CDC reported.

Excluding 24 attendees who had provided evidence through antibody testing of having already been infected with and recovered from the virus, 91 percent, or 116, of the 128 students who had not previously been infected with the virus were determined to have Covid-19 either with a positive PCR test or a diagnosis based on symptoms.

Although the boys, all of high school age, were required to wear masks when traveling to the camp, they were allowed to go without them once they arrived and to mingle freely. The students and 21 counselors slept in close quarters: the students living four to six per room in dormitories or eight per room in yurts, and the counselors staying together in dormitories and yurts.

After the ninth grader tested positive, he was quarantined with 11 of his close contacts. After the 11 contacts tested negative by rapid antigen tests, they were released from quarantine. However, during the first week of the camp, six of the 11, as well as 18 others, reported a new onset of mild symptoms. These students were given masks, but not isolated, and there was no contact tracing, the researchers wrote.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services was notified of the outbreak July 15, and on July 28, the department tested 148 of the 152 retreat attendees. Antibody tests showed that91 percent of those who had not been infected prior to arriving at the camp, 116 out of 128, had developed an infection while there.

None of the teachers, who were quartered separately from the students and the counselors and wore masks during class and practiced social distancing at all times, tested positive for the disease.

All the illnesses were mild and there were no deaths or hospitalizations reported among those who caught the virus.

“The attack rate was extraordinary both in terms of the number infected, as well as the pace at which they were infected,” Dr. Stuart Ray, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, said.“It illustrates how hard it has been to control,” he said.

Given that the students and the counselors were allowed to mix freely and were not required to wear masks or practice social distancing, an outbreak

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health

China shows off rapid lockdown system after latest outbreak

By Cate Cadell

BEIJING (Reuters) – Days after a 17-year-old girl tested positive for COVID-19 in a remote part of western China last week, health authorities said they had tested over 4.7 million people in the region.

China’s strict formula of immediate lockdowns and mass testing even at the first signs of infection has been vital to its success in controlling the disease, allowing its economy to quickly recover from the crisis, officials say.

The highly orchestrated strategy – described as “overkill” even by its own proponents – is unique among major economies at a time when Europe and the United States are facing a massive surge of new cases and often chaotic policies.

At the time the girl was diagnosed, the Kashgar region of Xinjiang had reported no new cases for almost 70 days.

“China has taken the most comprehensive, strictest and most thorough control and prevention measures since the COVID-19 pandemic started,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said on Wednesday.

“The facts show China’s measures are effective.”

Key to the programme are factors unique to China, including the Communist Party’s tight grip on all aspects of society.

Authorities have unimpeded access to personal information as part of an expansive surveillance network, which has played a major role in tracing infections.

The government has also quickly enlisted the help of businesses, which are churning out tens of millions of test kits, and tightly controls their pricing and distribution, issues which have severely set back efforts to contain the disease in other countries.

China has reported just 2,382 cases since June. By contrast, Germany and France are set to follow Italy and Spain back into partial lockdowns, as Europe reported a record 230,000 cases in one day earlier this week, while U.S. cases are set to hit 9 million soon.

MASS TESTINGS

In August, Beijing ordered all major hospitals in the country to offer testing, and said there should be one urban testing base constructed for every million residents, with the capacity to scale up to 30,000 tests a day in a local outbreak.

Regions are also required to share resources, in sharp contrast to the early days of the outbreak, when several cities were accused of stealing equipment from each other.

The system, like all Chinese Communist blueprints, is highly structured around specific targets; testing teams should be able to complete a campaign within seven days.

Earlier this month, almost 11 million test results were delivered in around five days in the eastern port city of Qingdao. In Wuhan, the initial epicentre of the pandemic, over 9 million samples were taken over 10 days in May.

The mass testings are mandatory. Some are held in outdoor sporting venues and city parks, with hundreds of people lining up.

PUTTING PEOPLE AT EASE

Epidemiologists have called into question the efficacy of the mass testing events, noting some patients require multiple tests over time to return a positive result.

The tests in Kashgar this week revealed around 38 positive cases

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health

Organised ‘overkill’: China shows off rapid lockdown system after latest outbreak

BEIJING (Reuters) – Days after a 17-year-old girl tested positive for COVID-19 in a remote part of western China last week, health authorities said they had tested over 4.7 million people in the region.

FILE PHOTO: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin speaks during a news conference in Beijing, China July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

China’s strict formula of immediate lockdowns and mass testing even at the first signs of infection has been vital to its success in controlling the disease, allowing its economy to quickly recover from the crisis, officials say.

The highly orchestrated strategy – described as “overkill” even by its own proponents – is unique among major economies at a time when Europe and the United States are facing a massive surge of new cases and often chaotic policies.

At the time the girl was diagnosed, the Kashgar region of Xinjiang had reported no new cases for almost 70 days.

“China has taken the most comprehensive, strictest and most thorough control and prevention measures since the COVID-19 pandemic started,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said on Wednesday.

“The facts show China’s measures are effective.”

Key to the programme are factors unique to China, including the Communist Party’s tight grip on all aspects of society.

Authorities have unimpeded access to personal information as part of an expansive surveillance network, which has played a major role in tracing infections.

The government has also quickly enlisted the help of businesses, which are churning out tens of millions of test kits, and tightly controls their pricing and distribution, issues which have severely set back efforts to contain the disease in other countries.

China has reported just 2,382 cases since June. By contrast, Germany and France are set to follow Italy and Spain back into partial lockdowns, as Europe reported a record 230,000 cases in one day earlier this week, while U.S. cases are set to hit 9 million soon.

MASS TESTINGS

In August, Beijing ordered all major hospitals in the country to offer testing, and said there should be one urban testing base constructed for every million residents, with the capacity to scale up to 30,000 tests a day in a local outbreak.

Regions are also required to share resources, in sharp contrast to the early days of the outbreak, when several cities were accused of stealing equipment from each other.

The system, like all Chinese Communist blueprints, is highly structured around specific targets; testing teams should be able to complete a campaign within seven days.

Earlier this month, almost 11 million test results were delivered in around five days in the eastern port city of Qingdao. In Wuhan, the initial epicentre of the pandemic, over 9 million samples were taken over 10 days in May.

The mass testings are mandatory. Some are held in outdoor sporting venues and city parks, with hundreds of people lining up.

PUTTING PEOPLE AT EASE

Epidemiologists have called into question the efficacy of the mass testing events, noting some patients require multiple tests over time

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medicine

Study in Nature Medicine shows superior patient outcomes in LLS’s Beat AML clinical trial

Rye Brook, NY (Monday, October 26, 2020) – Patients participating in The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) groundbreaking precision medicine Beat AML Master Clinical Trial had superior outcomes compared to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who opted for standard chemotherapy treatment, according to findings published today in the prestigious Nature Medicine journal.

The Beat AML trial achieved its primary endpoint by showing genomic analysis of the leukemia cells to identify AML subtypes can be completed within an unprecedented seven days, giving patients, caregivers and their doctors ample time to make a more personalized treatment decision without risking the patient’s chance for survival.

In other key findings, the study demonstrated a paradigm shift in how patients diagnosed with AML should be treated, proving that using genetic information to match patients to targeted therapies leads to better survival rates than the traditional one-size-fits all treatment approach.

AML is an extremely fast-moving cancer of the marrow and blood, affecting 21,000 people in the U.S. a year, and killing 10,000. For decades patients have been given the same treatments almost immediately upon diagnosis because waiting allows the cancer cells to grow out of control. This standard of care involves either infusion of a combination of two chemotherapies, cytarabine and daunorubicin, or treatment with a so-called hypomethylating agent, a drug that unleashes signals allowing the cancer cells to die.

“The study shows that delaying treatment up to seven days is feasible and safe, and that patients who opted for the precision medicine approach experienced a lower early death rate and superior overall survival compared to patients who opted for standard of care,” said John C. Byrd, MD, D. Warren Brown Chair of Leukemia Research of The Ohio State University, and one of the Beat AML leads and corresponding author of the study. “This patient-centric study shows that we can move away from chemotherapy treatment for patients who won’t respond or can’t withstand the harsh effects of the same chemotherapies we’ve been using for 40 years and match them with a treatment better suited for their individual case.”

Going on the Offensive Against AML


Recognizing the urgent need to do better for AML patients, LLS launched this clinical trial in fall 2016 to test multiple novel targeted therapies at major cancer centers across the U.S., in newly diagnosed AML patients aged 60 and older. In a historic first for cancer clinical trials, LLS is the first non-profit health organization to sponsor a trial and hold the IND (Investigational New Drug) application from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Beat AML partnered with Foundation Medicine Inc. to employ next generation genomic sequencing to rapidly analyze the patients’ cancer cells, and identify the patients’ AML subtype so they can be given a targeted therapy within a safe timeframe.

“The breadth of this collaboration, with every clinician, cancer center, pharmaceutical partner and all of the many operations and technical support companies, all unified in working toward the common goal of building a new model for tackling this challenging

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health

Cold temperatures, vitamin A can help the body burn more fat, study shows

People looking to lose weight may start embracing the winter months after a new study found cold temperatures and increased vitamin A encourage fat burning.

The study, which was published in the journal Molecular Metabolism last week, explored the effects cold temperatures and vitamin A had on converting white fat, which is where excess calories are stored, to brown fat, which “stimulates fat burning and heat generation.”

More than 90% of the human body’s fat deposits are white fat, which is stored in the abdomen, bottom and upper thighs, the study shares.

Cold temperatures applied to mice was found to increase vitamin A production, which resulted in higher fat burning. 

Cold temperatures applied to mice was found to increase vitamin A production, which resulted in higher fat burning. 
(iStock)

LONDON MARATHON MEDALIST SARA HALL SAYS POSITIVITY AND FAITH HELPED HER ACROSS THE FINISH LINE

According to the findings, cold temperatures increased vitamin A levels, which helps convert white to brown fat, thus stimulating fat burning. Vitamin A reserves are mostly stored in the liver. Once cold was applied to the mice in the study, the increases in “the levels of vitamin A and its blood transporter, retinol-binding protein” led to a higher rate of fat burning as the white fat converted to brown as the body attempting to keep itself warm.

Alternatively, when “the vitamin A transporter ‘retinol-binding protein’” was blocked in mice, the fat did not “brown” and the mice were unable to protect themselves from the cold.

FITNESS INFLUENCER SHOWS HOW ‘BEFORE AND AFTER’ PHOTOS ARE MANIPULATED

The study is promising in finding solutions to dealing with weight gain and obesity. Though the study’s lead researcher, Florian Kiefer from the Medical University of Vienna, cautioned against taking large quantities of vitamin A supplements in an effort to lose weight.

WOMAN LOSES 117 POUNDS AFTER BEING TURNED AWAY FROM BRIDAL BOUTIQUE

“Our results show that vitamin A plays an important role in the function of adipose tissue and affects global energy metabolism. However, this is not an argument for consuming large amounts of vitamin A supplements if not prescribed, because it is critical that vitamin A is transported to the right cells at the right time,” explains the MedUni Vienna researcher. “We have discovered a new mechanism by which vitamin A regulates lipid combustion and heat generation in cold conditions. This could help us to develop new therapeutic interventions that exploit this specific mechanism.”

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