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Baylor Scott & White Health announces new affiliations with Baylor College of Medicine and Texas A&M University to further expand the pipeline of exceptional clinical talent for Texas

Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit health system in the state of Texas, today announced two separate academic affiliations: a new affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine and an expanded affiliation with its long-time partner Texas A&M University. Both alliances are aimed at training future clinicians and developing programs that advance high-quality care and healthcare innovation. 

“We believe these long-term partnerships will ensure that our patients will have access to breakthrough medical discoveries and cutting-edge treatments from world-class physicians for generations to come,” said Peter J. McCanna, president, Baylor Scott & White.  

Baylor Scott & White offers the full continuum of care, from primary to award-winning specialty care, through an integrated care delivery network of 52 hospitals and more than 1,100 access points including flagship academic medical centers in Dallas and Temple. Baylor Scott & White extends investigational expertise across more than 50 medical specialties through Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, which provides the business and regulatory infrastructure to accelerate medical breakthroughs and innovative new treatment models. Baylor Scott & White Research Institute oversees nearly 2,000 active trials each year. 

Establishing a new Baylor College of Medicine regional medical school campus in Temple 

Baylor Scott & White and Baylor College of Medicine today announce a new affiliation to enhance the organizations’ collective impact on the statewide effort to train more students to become physicians.  

Additionally, the affiliation will allow for opportunities for expanded research and program development, with the ultimate goal of improving health and healthcare for Texans. 

The new 20-year relationship will be anchored by the development of a progressive four-year regional medical school campus in Temple, Texas, where Baylor College of Medicine will offer a curriculum highlighted by an approach that fully integrates health system and university resources to deliver adaptive and personalized medical education.  

“This is a great opportunity to expand Baylor College of Medicine’s outstanding medical education programs to a regional medical school campus,” said Dr. Paul Klotman, president, CEO and executive dean of Baylor College of Medicine. “We are looking forward to being in Temple.”  

Through a holistic recruiting process, Baylor College of Medicine focuses on recruiting a diverse class of students who are from and reflective of the communities that Baylor Scott & White serves. An inaugural class of 40 medical students is anticipated to begin training in Fall 2023. The campus will increase by 40 students a year over four years. The medical school is excited to welcome 160 more students to experience the caliber of education offered by Baylor College of Medicine. 

Baylor College of Medicine will strive to maintain a high percentage of Texas residents in the medical school. The goal of the new affiliation is to further expand the physician workforce pipeline for Texas with graduates having the opportunity to serve as future leaders in communities and providing outstanding clinical care for the people of Texas.  

The regional medical school campus in Temple will be overseen by the Baylor College of Medicine School of Medicine Dean, and

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medicine

Baylor Scott & White teams with Baylor College of Medicine on new med school campus in Temple

Two of Texas’ leading health care players are teaming up to create a new medical school campus to reduce the state’s physician shortage and foster more health care innovation.

Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest nonprofit hospital system in Texas, said it’s collaborating with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, the state’s top-ranked medical school. Their 20-year agreement will be anchored by a regional medical school campus in Temple, about a two-hour drive south of Dallas.

In 2023, an inaugural class of 40 medical students is expected to begin training in Temple, and over four years, enrollment is projected to total 160.

The organizations will rely on tuition and donations for expenses, not state funding — with Dallas-based Baylor Scott & White covering any financial shortfalls, said Peter McCanna, president of the hospital company.

“We really believe this is crucially important for our patients and for Texas,” McCanna said in an interview. “Having top educators and top students and residents in the mix makes for the best medical care for our patients.”

Four years ago, the two announced a research alliance that included working together on clinical trials. They share a common heritage and the school started in Dallas in 1900. The school moved to Houston in 1943 and separated from Baylor University in 1969 to become independent.

“This is a great opportunity to expand Baylor College of Medicine’s outstanding medical education programs to a regional medical school campus,” Dr. Paul Klotman, CEO of the school, said in a statement. “We are looking forward to being in Temple.”

“This affiliation is good for Texans in a number of ways,” said Jim Hinton, CEO of the health system. “It will not only help us develop and keep more clinicians in a state that projects a continued physician shortage, it makes groundbreaking research from the country’s top institutions more available to the millions of Texans we serve each year.”

Baylor Scott & White already has a regional medical school campus in Temple with Texas A&M University. That will be relocating to Dallas as part of the moves announced on Tuesday.

Over 200 medical students from Texas A&M currently train at BS&W facilities, the company said. That number will grow to over 300 medical students over the next three years. A majority of those students will train in Dallas, making it the school’s largest regional medical campus, officials said.

The two also may develop a new physician assistant program and increase educational opportunities in nursing and pharmacy in Bryan-College Station.

“This collaboration leverages our strengths to develop an innovative health care workforce to deliver the next generation of high-value care,” John Sharp, chancellor of the Texas A&M University System, said in a statement. “I am excited to see this relationship grow and continue to flourish.”

Baylor, whose revenue topped $10 billion last year, operates 52 hospitals, 26 surgery centers and 557 specialty care clinics. It has about 49,000 employees, including joint ventures, and does over 7.5 million patient encounters a year.

The

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health

Scott Gottlieb warns of ‘sustained period’ with ‘well above’ 1,000 people dying from COVID-19 a day

The U.S. could begin seeing more than 1,000 coronavirus deaths per day for a “sustained period of time,” the former head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Tuesday. 

“We’re probably going to see significant spread across the entire United States in a confluent epidemic that we’re much better prepared to deal with, so I don’t think that we’re going to see the excess death that we saw with the first wave of this pandemic when it struck New York,” Scott Gottlieb told CNBC’sSquawk Box.” 


Our country is in a historic fight against the Coronavirus. Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


“But the sheer fact that we’re going to be infecting so many people right now is probably going to mean that the death tolls get well above 1,000 for a sustained period of time,” Gottlieb said. 

The public health expert told the news outlet that the next several months could be “the last acute phase of this pandemic” and predicted the U.S. could be in a better coronavirus situation next year. He said cases will likely peak by the time a new president is inaugurated in January. 

Currently, the U.S. is averaging more than 83,000 new cases per day and more than 830 deaths, according to The COVID Tracking Project. The number of daily deaths is still far lower than the peak daily death toll in the spring when the U.S. was averaging more than 2,000 deaths. 

Outbreaks are on the rise in most states, with some states reporting record hospitalizations. The U.S. on Friday reported more than 99,000 new cases — a record peak of confirmed infections in a single day. Gottlieb previously warned the country would cross 100,000 infections per day in the next couple of weeks or sooner. 

Earlier this week, the former FDA commissioner warned that the Thanksgiving holiday could be the “inflection point” of a dangerous surge in cases that has already kicked off. He said the country is right at the beginning of “what looks like exponential growth” in the Midwest and Great Lakes region.


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Stanford faculty demand university sanctions for Trump adviser and faculty member Scott Atlas

Scott Atlas; Donald Trump
Scott Atlas; Donald Trump

US President Donald Trump (L) listens to White House coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas speak during a press conference in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House on September 23, 2020, in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

This article originally appeared here on Salon.com

Scott Atlas, one of President Trump’s special coronavirus advisers and a faculty member at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution in Palo Alto, Calif., is causing a minor fracas among students and faculty at the elite university. Specifically, Atlas’ recommendations on coronavirus public health measures fly in the face of scientific consensus, faculty says — a charge that Atlas denies, and which he has threatened litigation over.  

During a Faculty Senate meeting at Stanford University late last month, the college’s president and provost were asked whether Dr. Scott Atlas should face university sanctions for positions he has taken about the novel coronavirus pandemic that go against the scientific consensus. (As the faculty noted, Atlas is a neuroradiologist, not an epidemiologist or a scholar of infectious disease.) At the meeting, similar questions were raised about the university’s relationship with the Hoover Institution, where Atlas is a senior fellow. The Hoover Institution is a conservative think tank located on Stanford’s campus that has supported a laundry list of prominent right-wing statesmen over the years, from Condoleezza Rice to Reagan Secretary of State George Shultz. 

Unsurprisingly given the politics of his employer, Atlas’ public statements tend to delight conservatives and alarm scientists who study public health and infectious diseases. Atlas recently tweeted that masks do not work to prevent infection (an unsupported claim, and one which Twitter wound up taking down for being misleading); previously, he claimed publicly that the threat of the coronavirus is greatly exaggerated. Atlas also claimed that summer civil rights protests were to blame for coronavirus outbreaks, as well as proximity to the U.S.-Mexico border, two more claims for which there is no evidence.

Despite being described by Trump as “one of the great experts of the world,” Atlas is reported to not have expertise in infectious disease mitigation or public health. Most recently, Atlas raised eyebrows last week for appearing on Russian state broadcaster RT, which is registered with the Justice Department as an agent of the Russian government.

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David Spiegel, a medicine professor and associate chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, claimed during the late October meeting (which occurred before the RT interview) that Atlas is the “latest member of the Hoover Institution to disseminate incorrect and unscientific information about the coronavirus pandemic,” according to Stanford News. He also accused Atlas of violating the American Medical Association’s Code of Ethics and claimed that he may have additionally violated Stanford’s Code of Conduct.

University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne responded by citing the college’s Statement on Academic Freedom, although the provost acknowledged the validity of engineering professor Stephen Monismith’s concern about a New York Times report that some of Trump’s senior economic advisers had

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb warns of ‘staggering’ Covid death totals in U.S.

The United States could see “staggering” numbers of coronavirus deaths in the coming months as infection rates increase during the colder months, Dr. Scott Gottlieb told CNBC’s “Closing Bell” on Friday.

There were 916 deaths from Covid-19 in the U.S. on Friday, according to data compiled by the Covid Tracking Project, an independent volunteer organization launched by journalists at The Atlantic. New coronavirus cases eclipsed 71,600 on Thursday.

Gottlieb, a physician who served as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner, emphasized that doctors have improved their treatment of Covid-19 patients during the pandemic, bringing down the mortality rate. He has said it might have been reduced by 50%.

Patient care also has been improved due to drugs such as Gilead Sciences’ remdesivir, which on Thursday became an FDA-approved treatment for Covid-19, as well as the use of steroids such as dexamethasone, according to Gottlieb. President Donald Trump received both after his coronavirus diagnosis.

Despite these positive developments, Gottlieb said the challenge the U.S. is facing now is simply how widespread the virus is across the country. “Mortality is going to be down, but we’re going to be infecting so many people that the daily death statistics are going to be staggering,” said Gottlieb, who led the FDA under Trump from May 2017 to April 2019.

There could be “well above 1,000” new deaths per day reported in the weeks ahead, he said. “And we might retest some of the totals that we saw in the spring, when we were reporting 2,000 deaths a day related to this virus, just because of the sheer number of people we’re likely to infect heading into the winter right now.”

The U.S. has almost 8.5 million confirmed cases of Covid-19 and at least 223,752 people have died, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Public health experts have been warning for months that colder weather during the fall and winter is likely to coincide with a resurgence of the coronavirus because people are spending more time indoors, where transmission can more easily occur.

The pandemic is intensifying in countries across the world, and some nations are on a “dangerous track,” the head of the World Health Organization warned Friday. “We are at a critical juncture in this pandemic, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere,” Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

Restrictions have again been implemented in parts of Europe, including an overnight curfew in regions of France, in an attempt to reduce the spread of Covid-19.

Gottlieb said he believes the response in the U.S. to rising infection rates will be targeted interventions in hot-spot areas, rather than the lockdown orders that were issued in the early stages of the pandemic when inadequate testing regimes made it difficult to determine where transmission was happening.

“I think we’re going to bear a lot more infection … and the health-care system is going to have to bear the brunt of this burden, because I don’t think you have the popular will for stay-at-home orders or broad

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