restrictions

fitness

Alberta fitness studios confused by COVID-19 restrictions on group classes, workouts

The Alberta government’s recent COVID-19 restrictions are impacting smaller fitness studios and many owners admit is a bit confusing.



Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.


© Jill Croteau/Global News
Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.

According to new health guidelines announced Tuesday, gyms all group classes aren’t allowed. Fitness studios, like Revive Lifestyle Fitness, can’t  do group training or semi-private training.  Owner Mike Du said they are only allowed to conduct one on ones, if a coach is involved.

Read more: The New Reality: The uncertain future of fitness studios

He says the problem is gyms can still have a group of members working out together, physically distanced. The trainer has to be kept outside the room. For Du, the logic doesn’t make sense.

“It’s hard for us to understand, part of it is about the coach pushing people in a way that’s high intensity and breathing hard,” Du said. “But there’s nothing stopping people from doing that if we put 12 people in there working out on their own.”

 

Guidelines don’t allow even a handful of participants to be led by a professional, even if it’s fewer numbers than a group without a trainer.

“As long as you have a group bigger than one you can’t have a coach present,” Du said.

These new rules are contradictory to the whole fitness model of some studios, ones that rely on the motivation of a trainer. Tricia McDonald owns Orangetheory Fitness in Airdrie.

“Typically we would have 24 people in here. But in this location we are capping it at 10 to 12 people per session,” McDonald said. “That means they are always physically distanced in the class. But there’s nobody coaching you into it anymore, so you have to essentially coach yourself.”

McDonald admits it is challenging but is grateful to be able to give clients the space to workout.

“To be able to pivot like this and stay open for them is so important to us right now,” McDonald said.

Orangetheory is preparing to launch a new platform called “Orangetheory Live” to adapt to the new guidelines.

“These will be coach inspired workouts you do in the safety of your own home,” McDonald said. “It’s not virtual, we are still connecting because the coach is there inspiring you, cheerleading you, correcting form and its much more than typical virtual workout.”

Video: Lethbridge fitness studio offers rent-a-bike program through COVID-19 restrictions

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fitness

Lethbridge fitness studio offers rent-a-bike program during COVID-19 restrictions



a person sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta's second wave of COVID-19.


© Global News
Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta’s second wave of COVID-19.

Kelleen Tait relies on her weekly workout sessions to keep grounded and manage her stress.

“During the first lockdown, I didn’t know what to do.”

With new Alberta gym capacity restrictions in place, she’s found a way to keep moving: a rent-a-bike program and virtual spin classes from local studio UNITE YQL.

Read more: Alberta enacts 2nd COVID-19 state of public health emergency. Here’s what it means

“It’s way harder than I would work out on my own and it really keeps me going,” Tait said.

For her, it’s not just about getting a sweat in. She says it allows her to still feel connected with instructors and a community she loves.

“As we’re all kind of shutting our doors and going into a bit more of an isolation mode, being able to generate that community is such a wonderful thing to be a part of and to support,” Tait said. “Especially when it’s [a local business] and it’s right in our downtown core.”

Owner of UNITE YQL, Vanessa Bishop, said it’s been a lifeline for her business and the supportive community they’ve worked to build over the last few years.

“The virtual program has allowed us to keep moving even though our physical space is temporarily closed.”

Although the decision to rent out expensive equipment was difficult, Bishop says it’s brought the studio’s high-energy barre and spin classes directly into clients’ homes. 

“[We can keep] giving hollers and encouraging the riders, because that’s the whole experience with us… It’s a fun atmosphere.”

Read more: Some businesses feel singled out as Alberta brings in stricter COVID-19 measures

The Lethbridge YMCA will also be offering virtual classes for members starting next week.

“There’s going to be fitness classes, yoga classes, wellness classes and all sorts of other items that will serve our community the best possible,” YMCA of Lethbridge Interim General Manager Scott Boyd said.

“We realize that everyone is dealing with this in all different ways.”

Boyd said a new gym space is now open on the facility’s main floor for those looking to move around safely.

Read more: Lethbridge gyms consider what reopening could look like

Tait says she plans to continue riding out the pandemic while supporting local business.

“I’m actually moving and I keep motivated,” she said. “It’s been great from a mental health aspect.”

She encourages others who might be interested in upping their at-home workouts to give it a spin.

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medicine

Michigan Medicine tightens restrictions for visitors

Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has tightened visitor restrictions for adult patients to minimize the spread of COVID-19 as cases continue to rise.

Beginning Wednesday, there will be no visitors allowed with adult patients at Michigan Medicine hospitals, except for some exceptions. Those exceptions are for end-of-life care, labor ad delivery, and other detailed here.

The new policy go with the other restrictions that have already been announced, which include no visitors with adult emergency department patients, two visitors for pediatric patients, and no visitors for adult patients at clinics.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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medicine

Michigan Medicine tightens visitor restrictions as hospitalizations continue to rise

ANN ARBOR, MI – No visitors will be allowed with adult patients in Michigan Medicine hospitals, except when medically necessary, as the health system tries to minimize COVID-19 spread.

Michigan Medicine announced the changes that will go into effect on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Information on exceptions, including end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations, can be found here.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, in a news release.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

The latest visitor limitations come in addition to restrictions the health system previously announced, including not allowing visitors with adult emergency department patients; a two-visitor limit for pediatric patients and mask requirement at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital; and no visitor rule for adult patients at Michigan Medicine clinics, unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

As of Nov. 23, Michigan Medicine reported 103 patients currently admitted that tested positive for COVID-19 – the highest number since late April.

Washer encouraged people to stay home this Thanksgiving and avoid gatherings with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving. If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread,” Washer said.

READ MORE:

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

Michigan coronavirus outbreaks increase 45% in 2 weeks

Exhausted in a ‘nightmare’: A look inside a Michigan hospital COVID unit

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fitness

Philadelphia Fitness Coalition protesting restrictions on city gyms amid coronavirus pandemic

More than two dozen gyms in Philadelphia are joining forces, demanding that the city allows them to reopen.

Philly Fitness Coalition is fighing the restrictions for gyms in the city

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They have created the Philadelphia Fitness Coalition and have gathered more than 1,500 signatures in opposition to the new restrictions.

As the number of covid-19 cases rises, the city required gyms to shut down indoor activities at the end of last week.

But gym owners say it is unfair because of the safety precautions they have put in place.

They plan to protest outside of City Hall on Tuesday.

Last week, the city’s top health official, Dr. Thomas Farley, defended the city’s decision to tighten restrictions, saying now is the riskiest time for the transmission of the virus.

“What was now safe is now dangerous with the change in the weather. Many businesses feel they put safety measures in place, sure they have, and I’m sure there’s no spread there and that’s true in many places. Remember, there are more people than ever with the virus,” said Farley.

City officials said dramatic action is needed to respond to an exponential growth in cases and hospitalizations.

On Thursday, health officials announced 765 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Philadelphia. That brings the number of confirmed cases to 57,237.

The number of residents who have died from the virus in Philadelphia is 1,945.

How is 2nd wave of COVID-19 impacting local hospitals?

As the second wave of COVID-19 hits the Philadelphia region, doctors and medical professionals discuss how the virus is impacting hospitals.

Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair closing

The new round of COVID-19 regulations was the final straw for one Philadelphia restaurant. The Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair is closing its doors for good after 70 years in business. The Lucky Cat Brewing Company, which is a standalone business inside the pub, will remain open.

Philadelphia museums knocked back down by new COVID-19 restrictions

The new restrictions put in place to tackle the surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia are hitting museums in the area hard. After going through a five-month shutdown during the first wave, they are being shut down again, which in some cases, will cause hard economic pain and uncertainty for employees.

National Constitution Center temporarily closes to the public through January 1, 2021

In accordance with health guidelines from the City of Philadelphia in response to COVID-19, the National Constitution Center is temporarily closed to the public through January 1, 2021. The Center offers a range of free online programs and resources for learners of all ages. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Houses of worship in Philly vow to persevere amid new COVID restrictions

The new COVID-19 restrictions in Philadelphia will have a major impact on houses of worship, which for the time being can operate at only 5% capacity. While the Archdiocese of Philadelphia revises its guidance, some churches and synagogues in the city have a variety of innovative plans

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medicine

Michigan Medicine announces restrictions to visitors as statewide COVID-19 cases surge

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine announced Monday it has added visitor restrictions at its hospitals and clinics to curb the spread of COVID-19 and to protect patients and staff.

Visitors are no longer allowed in the adult emergency department, except when medically necessary.

Its visitor policy at its adult hospitals and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital remains unchanged: one visitor per day per adult and two for pediatric patients. Visitors, including family, are required to wear a face covering that covers their nose and mouth at all Michigan Medicine properties, including inside a patient’s room. Patients who are able to tolerate a mask must wear one in the presence of a health care worker.

No visitors will be allowed in clinics for adult patients unless the patient has a physical or cognitive impairment that requires assistance. For pediatric patients, one primary caregiver is allowed at an appointment, unless an additional assistant or aide is required.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

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“We recognize the critical role that visitors – families and friends – play in the well-being of our patients. However, as the spread of COVID-19 hits record-setting levels across the state, we need to minimize the risk of transmission,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, said in a statement.

“Our top priority is the safety of our patients and our staff. We hope that by adding these restrictions, we will better protect everyone from COVID-19,” Washer continued. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Many people in our facilities are very sick or have weakened immune systems, which places them at higher risk,” Washer said in a statement. “Limiting visitors and requiring a mask at all times will help reduce the spread of infection.”

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medicine

Michigan Medicine implements visitor restrictions amid rising COVID-19 cases

(WXYZ) — Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has implemented visitor restrictions at its hospitals and clinics as COVID-19 cases continue to rise.

Related: Michigan health leaders: ‘Not only are the numbers alarming, people are dying’

The hospital group is the latest in southeast Michigan to implement restrictions, following Beaumont, Detroit Medical Center and Henry Ford Health System.

It’s the second time this year that visitor restrictions have been implemented. Those restrictions started being eased about 3 months after the pandemic began.

No visitors are allowed at Michigan Medicine with emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.

The number of visitors at adult hospitals and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital has not changed. One visitor per day is allowed for every adult and two for pediatric patients.

Family and other visitors have to wear a mask at all properties.

No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.

In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

There are some exceptions for end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations. You can view those here.

“We recognize the critical role that visitors – families and friends – play in the well-being of our patients. However, as the spread of COVID-19 hits record-setting levels across the state, we need to minimize the risk of transmission,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“Our top priority is the safety of our patients and our staff. We hope that by adding these restrictions, we will better protect everyone from COVID-19,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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fitness

Edmonton-area fitness studios frustrated by new COVID-19 restrictions

Edmonton-area fitness studio owners are left feeling frustrated after the province announced new restrictions in order to curb the spread of COVID-19.



Bre Baker, seen inside of Hive Fit Co. on Friday, Nov. 13, 2020, will have to close her new gym for two weeks due to the new COVID-19 restrictions.


© Provided by Edmonton Journal
Bre Baker, seen inside of Hive Fit Co. on Friday, Nov. 13, 2020, will have to close her new gym for two weeks due to the new COVID-19 restrictions.

The small business owners say they were caught off guard by the Thursday announcement that fitness classes would be cancelled when Premier Jason Kenney and Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health, have said in the past COVID-19 is mainly spread through social gatherings.

Bre Baker, owner of Hive Fit Co, had planned to open her new location on Saturday. She heard rumours that new restrictions might be coming down but she didn’t think she would have to delay the opening of her studio and completely shut down her business for two weeks.

“We were expecting some sort of restriction, but the government kept saying no businesses will close,” Baker said. “So we were like OK, they’re going to do something that like they did for the restaurants … we thought we would have something to be able to go off of.”

She said it would make more sense to have a full lockdown for a few weeks to get a handle on the COVID-19 cases.

“If it was sort of like we’re going to do a lockdown or we’re going to close everything except for essential (businesses) for these two weeks and it will be so worth it because all of the cases will go down, then I think everybody in this particular sector would be a lot more willing,” Baker said. ”

“But it does feel a little bit like why just us, if we want to make this huge impact especially because, even yesterday, when the premier was talking, he was saying these businesses have been doing such a great job, there hasn’t been transmission and all this stuff so it kind of feels a little bit like, OK, well, why is it just us especially when the big gyms are allowed to stay open?”

Kara Bell, co-owner of Raise The Bar in Sherwood Park echoed that sentiment.

“To say we were caught off guard is a huge understatement, we’re extremely disappointed considering that transmissions are not happening in small boutique style studios like ours,” Bell said. “The big gyms, the big facilities are still able to remain open so we’re not really understanding where this came from or the rationale.”

Bell said it’s frustrating the province is focusing on keeping the economy open, but the new measures are impacting small businesses.

“Our biggest fear is that we shut down for two weeks and the numbers don’t change,” she said. “And then what? We’re closed for another three months? Businesses can’t stay afloat.”

Zita Dube-Lockhart is the co-owner of Action Potential Fitness, which specializes in decreasing barriers of access physical fitness. She’s concerned how these restrictions may impact

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health

Italy imposing night curfew, other restrictions

ROME — Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte has signed off on new pandemic rules that include a nationwide overnight curfew and tighter restrictions on the country’s regions where infections are surging and hospitals risk running out of beds for COVID-19 patients.

The decree is to take effect Thursday. Regions to be hit with the strictest limits are to be announced Wednesday. Those restrictions include at least a two-week ban on entering or leaving the region’s territory and closure of all shops except essential ones like food stores.

One of those areas is expected to be the northern region of Lombardy. It bore the brunt of the pandemic earlier this year, and it is reeling again under a new surge, especially in its financial capital, Milan.


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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Russia reports 18,000 coronavirus cases for 5th straight day

— Germany reports more than 15,000 daily cases

— UK to test all Liverpool residents for coronavirus

— Huge voter turnout expected in U.S. despite virus, political rancor.

— Germany to expand use of antigen tests, hoping to keep nursing homes safe.

— U.S. woman’s mission is honoring COVID-19 victims by writing vignettes about their lives.

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— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin health officials reported a record 5,771 new coronavirus cases and 52 more deaths from COVID-19 on Tuesday, along with a testing positivity rate tracking ever higher.

Hospitalizations rose by 247 in the state, which for weeks has ranked as one of the nation’s worst hot spots for the virus. The state’s daily average of new cases has risen by 44% over the past two weeks, making it fourth-worst in the country for new cases per capita, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University.

The seven-day rolling average of the positivity rate in Wisconsin had risen over the past two weeks to 14.72% as of Monday.

Wisconsin has seen 2,102 deaths from the virus.

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INDIANAPOLIS — Former U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita, the Republican candidate for Indiana attorney general, has tested positive for COVID-19 after developing “some symptoms,” his campaign announced Tuesday.

Rokita faces Democratic candidate Jonathan Weinzapfel in Tuesday’s statewide election. He had been quarantining with his family after he was informed “by a person unconnected to any campaign activities that he was exposed to COVID-19,” Rokita’s campaign said in a statement.

The campaign said Rokita “just recently tested positive after developing some symptoms” and is doing well and working from home. Rokita planned to watch Tuesday’s election returns there with his family.

Rokita defeated current Republican Attorney General Curtis Hill, who faced allegations that he drunkenly groped four women during a party, for the GOP nomination in July.

Democrats are hoping Weinzapfel, a former Evansville mayor, can break the stranglehold Republicans have over state government in the most-contested statewide campaign on this year’s election ballot.

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PARIS — France reported 854 deaths from the coronavirus on Tuesday,

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health

Governor Baker defends new coronavirus restrictions

Governor Charlie Baker on Tuesday defended the raft of new restrictions he rolled out the day before that ordered some businesses to close by 9:30 p.m., urged people to stay home at night, and clamped down on private gatherings amid rising COVID-19 levels in Massachusetts.

“COVID has come with all kinds of difficult decisions, difficulties — and, in many cases, tragedies — for virtually everybody,” Baker said Tuesday during a State House news conference. “One of the things that’s critical to us is that schools stay open, and that businesses continue to be able to operate.”

In that context, Baker said, given “all of the feedback we’ve gotten from so many folks in local government … about the amount of activity that takes place that’s not regulated, that’s mostly going on in private residences late into the night, we felt it was important to send a message that people after 10 o’clock at night should be home with the people that they spend every day with, and to do what we can to limit the spread of COVID.”

The virus, Baker said, “for the most part at this point is moving through informal channels and informal arrangements and casual engagements between people who for the most part know each other. And the reason that’s so important now is because of that, our letting our guard down, we have a 300 percent increase in daily positive case rates since Labor Day … and a lot of concern in our health care and hospital community about what this trend will mean if it keeps running for another eight to 10 weeks.”

Baker said he understands the new restrictions are disruptive, especially for sectors such as the restaurant and recreation industries.

“But better to do something targeted now,” Baker said. “Send a message about how important it is for people to stop gathering in big groups … [and] basically encourage people, strongly, to be home with the people they spend every day with by 10 o’clock at night and see if we can’t do something to bend what is a very disturbing trend that if we just let run, will have real consequences for our healthcare system and ultimately for the rest of our economy as well. We’ll see what the data looks like in a month, but our hope is that it will look better.”

On Monday, Baker also tightened the state’s face-covering mandate, requiring anyone over 5 years old to wear a mask in public regardless of their distance from others.

The changes, which take effect Friday, were less stringent than some business owners had feared. But epidemiologists said the measures, while an important step toward communicating the pandemic’s severity, likely do not go far enough to turn back the state’s rising tide of infections.

Restaurants will have to halt table service at 9:30 p.m. each day, and facilities such as gyms, theaters, and casinos will have to close by the same time. Baker also said he’s restricting private indoor gatherings

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