response

medicine

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Clinical trial finds inhaled immune response protein increases odds of recovery for hospitalised COVID-19 patients

Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / People

  • Inhaled delivery of a formulation of a key protein involved in the immune response – interferon beta-1a – to hospitalised COVID-19 patients in the UK reduced the odds that they would develop severe disease or die from SARS CoV-2 infection.
  • Those patients who received inhaled interferon beta-1a were more than twice as likely to recover from COVID-19 infection to a point where everyday activities were not limited compared with those who received a placebo.
  • The trial included 101 patients, with the data providing strong rationale for larger studies to further investigate the impact of this treatment on clinical outcomes.

Hospitalised COVID-19 patients in the UK who received an inhaled form of interferon beta-1a (SNG001) were more likely to recover and less likely to develop severe symptoms than patients who received a placebo, according to a new clinical trial published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. This is the first evidence published in a peer-reviewed medical journal that inhaled interferon beta-1a could lessen the clinical consequences of COVID-19 and serves as proof-of-concept that this treatment could help hospitalised patients recover, but further research is required.

As the number of COVID-19 infections continues to rise around the world, there is a pressing need to develop new treatments for the more severe and life-threatening symptoms such as pneumonia and respiratory failure.

Interferon beta is a naturally occurring protein that coordinates the body’s immune response to viral infections. Laboratory studies have found that the SARS CoV-2 virus directly suppresses the release of interferon beta, while clinical trials demonstrate decreased activity of this important protein in COVID-19 patients. The formulation of interferon beta used in this new study – SNG001 – is directly delivered to the lungs via inhalation and has been trialled in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SNG001 to treat hospitalised COVID-19 patients.

The trial was conducted at nine UK hospitals with patients who had a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. It compared the effects of SNG001 and placebo given to patients once daily for up to 14 days, and followed up patients for a maximum of 28 days after starting the treatment. Patients were recruited from March 30 to May 30, 2020, and were randomly assigned to receive the treatment or a placebo. All members of the research team were blinded to which group the patients were allocated. During the study, changes in the clinical condition of patients were monitored.

Of the 101 patients enrolled in the study, 98 patients were given the treatment in the trial (three patients withdrew from the trial) – 48 received SNG001 and 50 received a placebo. At the outset of the trial 66 (67%) patients required oxygen supplementation at baseline (29 people in the placebo group and 37 in the SNG001 group). Patients who received SNG001 were twice as likely to show an improvement in their clinical condition at day 15 or 16, compared with

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health

Poor US pandemic response will reverberate in health care politics for years, health scholars warn

<span class="caption">A COVID-19 test in Utah. The country's pandemic response has been politicized, making comprehensive changes to public health more difficult. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/VirusOutbreakUtah/83ec3c8c78fd46b39752cfeaa6241a66/photo?Query=COVID-19%20surge&mediaType=photo&sortBy=arrivaldatetime:desc&dateRange=Anytime&totalCount=1467&currentItemNo=36" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Rick Bowmer">AP Photo/Rick Bowmer</a></span>
A COVID-19 test in Utah. The country’s pandemic response has been politicized, making comprehensive changes to public health more difficult. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Much has been written about the U.S. coronavirus response. Media accounts frequently turn to experts for their insights – commonly, epidemiologists or physicians. Countless surveys have also queried Americans and individuals from around the world about how the pandemic has affected them and their attitudes and opinions.

Yet little is known about the views of a group of people particularly well qualified to render judgment on the U.S.‘s response and offer policy solutions: academic health policy and politics researchers. These researchers, like the two of us, come from a diverse set of disciplines, including public health and public policy. Their research focuses on the intricate linkages between politics, the U.S. health system and health policy. They are trained to combine applied and academic knowledge, take broader views and be fluent across multiple disciplines.

To explore this scholarly community’s opinions and perceptions, we surveyed hundreds of U.S.-based researchers, first in April 2020 and then again in September. Specifically, we asked them about the U.S. COVID-19 response, the upcoming elections and the long-term implications of the pandemic and response for the future of U.S. health policy and the broader political system.

Overall, the results of our survey – with 400 responses, which have been published in full in our recent academic article – paint a picture of a damaged reputation to government institutions. Surveyed scholars also believe the poor government response will shift the politics of health care. At the same time, our findings don’t show strong belief in major policy changes on health.

Parceling out the blame

We first asked respondents how much responsibility various actors bear for the lack of preparedness in the U.S. Here scholars overwhelming assign blame to one source: 93% of respondents blamed President Trump for the overall lack of preparedness “a lot” or “a great deal.” Moreover, 94% in April and 98% in September saw political motivations as the main drivers of the president’s actions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration, as well as Congress, also deserve a significant amount of blame, survey respondents said. At the other end of the spectrum, scholars were relatively content with the response by local and state governments as well as that of the World Health Organization.

coronavirus testing site in Los Angeles with cars.
coronavirus testing site in Los Angeles with cars.

Notably, perceptions grew significantly more negative for all entities between April and September. This likely reflects frustrations with the continued inability to rein in the spread of the virus.

Effects on the political system and health policy

Respondents also offered a particularly grim view of the long-term implications of the failed coronavirus response for the United States.

Survey after survey has shown that partisanship influences individuals’ perceptions of the coronavirus pandemic. Early research indicates that right-leaning media and presidential communication may have significantly contributed to these discrepancies and increased polarization.

And according to

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health

Top Trump adviser bluntly contradicts president on covid-19 threat, urging all-out response

A top White House coronavirus adviser sounded alarms Monday about a new and deadly phase in the health crisis, pleading with top administration officials for “much more aggressive action,” even as President Trump continues to assure rallygoers the nation is “rounding the turn” on the pandemic.



Deborah Birx wearing a suit and tie: Deborah Birx delivers remarks on the pandemic in the White House last April. (Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)


Deborah Birx delivers remarks on the pandemic in the White House last April. (Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

“We are entering the most concerning and most deadly phase of this pandemic … leading to increasing mortality,” said the Nov. 2 report from Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force. “This is not about lockdowns — It hasn’t been about lockdowns since March or April. It’s about an aggressive balanced approach that is not being implemented.”

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Birx’s internal report, shared with top White House and agency officials, contradicts Trump on numerous points: While the president holds large campaign events with hundreds of attendees, most without masks, she explicitly warns against them. While the president blames rising cases on more testing, she says testing is “flat or declining” in many areas where cases are rising. And while Trump says the country is “rounding the turn,” Birx notes the country is entering its most dangerous period yet and will see more than 100,000 new cases a day this week.

Through a spokesperson, Birx did not respond to a request for comment.

Other health experts, including Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have warned of record surges in cases and hospitalizations as the United States records more than 9 million cases and 230,000 deaths. “We’re in for a whole lot of hurt,” Fauci told The Washington Post late Friday, predicting a long and potentially deadly winter unless there’s an “abrupt change” — prompting Trump to suggest he planned to fire the scientist after the election.

But Birx’s daily missives go further, revealing how much the administration’s internal reports are in direct conflict with Trump’s public pronouncements that downplay the seriousness of the threat and erroneously suggest few people are dying. They also speak to the increasing desperation of health officials to spotlight the risks of a pandemic that is forecast to take thousands more lives as the weather worsens unless people change their behaviors.

The increasingly dire tone of her reports has gotten little traction, according to an administration official who works with Birx and spoke on the condition of anonymity to share sensitive information. “She feels like she’s being ignored,” the official said.

Birx’s message “has been urgent for weeks,” said another administration official, “as has the plea for the administration to ask the American people to use masks, avoid gatherings and socially distance, basically since it became apparent that we were heading into a third surge.”

The report hits hard on the worsening situation: “Cases are rapidly rising in nearly 30 percent of all USA counties, the highest number of county hotspots we have seen with this pandemic,” it said. “Half of the United States is

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health

Fauci warns of COVID-19 surge, opposes Trump’s response

‘It’s not a good situation,’ said Fauci

President Donald Trump’s repeated stance that the United States is “rounding the turn” on the coronavirus global pandemic has increased concerns among the government’s top health experts.

Many have warned that the country is heading towards a long and potentially deadly winter with “an unprepared government unwilling to make tough choices,” according to The Washington Post.

Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s leading infectious-disease expert, warned in a wide-ranging interview late Friday of what’s to come for the country in the winter months during the pandemic.

“We’re in for a whole lot of hurt. It’s not a good situation,” Fauci said. “All the stars are aligned in the wrong place as you go into the fall and winter season, with people congregating at home indoors. You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

Read More: Fauci advocates mask mandate amid COVID-19 surge across US

Fauci’s stern warnings come in response to the number of maskless Trump rallies across the country, and cities experiencing record surges in coronavirus infections and hospitalizations. 13 battleground states have reported rising coronavirus cases including Michigan, Texas, Florida, and Wisconsin.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. The committee is examining the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Alex Edelman-Pool/Getty Images)
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. The committee is examining the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Alex Edelman-Pool/Getty Images)

Fauci said the United States needed to make an “abrupt change” in its public health practices and behaviors in response to the virus. He said the country could surpass 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day and predicted fatalities in the next coming weeks.

His response comes as the country hit a new daily record Friday with more than 98,000 confirmed cases, according to The Washington Post.

During his campaign stop in Waterford Township, Mich., Trump downplayed the virus and mocked those who take it seriously, saying that some doctors record more COVID-19 deaths than others because they receive more money.

Read More: White House vetted celebrities to help president ‘defeat coronavirus despair’

“I mean our doctors are very smart people. So what they do is they say, ‘I’m sorry but everybody dies of COVID,’ ” Trump said.

By contrast, the Biden-Harris campaign has taken strides to follow protocols by wearing masks in public and having socially distanced events. Harris cancelled travel for several days when two people who travelled with her tested positive in October, as reported by NPR. When asked about the difference in approaches, Fauci commented that Biden’s campaign “is taking it

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health

White House unleashes on Fauci after criticism of Atlas and Trump’s pandemic response

The White House on Saturday unleashed on Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious disease expert, following his comments to the Washington Post that criticized the Trump administration’s response to the pandemic, including Dr. Scott Atlas, who the President has relied on for advice on handling the coronavirus.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 07: Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens to U.S. President Donald Trump speak to reporters following a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on April 7, 2020 in Washington, DC. The president today removed the independent chairman of a committee tasked with overseeing the roll out of the $2 trillion coronavirus bailout package. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 07: Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens to U.S. President Donald Trump speak to reporters following a meeting of the coronavirus task force in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on April 7, 2020 in Washington, DC. The president today removed the independent chairman of a committee tasked with overseeing the roll out of the $2 trillion coronavirus bailout package. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

“It’s unacceptable and breaking with all norms for Dr. Fauci, a senior member of the President’s Coronavirus Taskforce and someone who has praised President (Donald) Trump’s actions throughout this pandemic, to choose three days before an election to play politics,” White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said in a statement to CNN on Saturday evening.

Deere took issue with Fauci’s comments where the doctor seemingly praises Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s campaign. Fauci told the Post that the Democratic nominee’s campaign “is taking it seriously from a public health perspective.” While Trump, Fauci said, is “looking at it from a different perspective.” He said that perspective was “the economy and reopening the country,” according to the Post.

“As a member of the Task Force, Dr. Fauci has a duty to express concerns or push for a change in strategy, but he’s not done that, instead choosing to criticize the President in the media and make his political leanings known by praising the President’s opponent— exactly what the American people have come to expect from The Swamp,” Deere said.

Fauci, a leading member of the government’s coronavirus response, said the United States needed to make an “abrupt change” in public health practices and behaviors, according to the Post. He said the country could surpass 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day and predicted rising deaths in the coming weeks.

“Dr. Fauci knows that the risks today are dramatically lower than they were only a few months ago with mortality rates falling over 80%. The Trump Administration, through the work of the Task Force, continues to surge testing, PPE, personnel, and capacity to protect the vulnerable, help schools reopen, and respond to conditions on the ground,” Deere said.

In Friday’s interview with the Post, Fauci also criticized Atlas, a neuroradiologist and Trump’s hand-picked coronavirus adviser, for his lack of expertise.

“I have real problems with that guy,” Fauci said. “He’s a smart guy who’s talking about things that I believe he doesn’t have any real insight or knowledge or experience in. He keeps talking about things that when you dissect it out and parse it out, it doesn’t make any sense.”

Atlas responded to Fauci on Twitter, tweeting on Saturday night:

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health

Canada says stronger response needed to fight coronavirus, PM hopes to avoid major shutdown

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Canadians need to do more to tackle a second wave of the coronavirus by slashing the number of personal contacts they have with others, health authorities said on Friday.

FILE PHOTO: People walk in the Eaton Centre shopping mall, as the provincial phase 2 of reopening from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions begins in Toronto, Ontario, Canada June 24, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio/File Photo

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said more targeted measures could help avert another major national shutdown of the kind that hammered the economy earlier in the year.

Released modeling updates show the cumulative death toll in the country could range between 10,285 and 10,400 by Nov 8. Cumulative cases could be between 251,800 and 262,200 by the same date.

“(The) long-range forecast indicates that a stronger response is needed now to slow the spread of COVID-19,” chief public health officer Theresa Tam told a briefing.

“If we decrease our current rate of contacts by 25% the epidemic is forecast to come under control in most locations,” she said.

Canada has recorded 10,074 deaths and 228,542 cases so far and is breaking daily records for the number of new cases.

Suncor Energy SU.TO, Canada’s second-biggest oil producer, confirmed 19 infections among workers at its Firebag oil sands site in Alberta, dating back to Oct. 18. All of those affected are in isolation at home or other locations, spokeswoman Erin Rees said.

Suncor shut down part of the site where 17 of the employees worked, but the outbreak has not affected oil production, she said.

Some provinces are reintroducing bans on indoor dining and limiting the size of gatherings.

Manitoba, which has the highest rate of active cases per capita among provinces, said it would tighten restrictions starting on Monday. In Winnipeg, where most cases are located, all restaurants and bars will close to in-person dining.

Trudeau said authorities know more now about the pandemic than they did six months ago.

“There are things we can do to help to control the pandemic, the second wave, without – we hope – having to impose a nationwide shutdown,” he told the briefing.

Additional reporting by Rod Nickel in Winnipeg and Moira Warburton in Toronto; Editing by Kirsten Donovan, Aurora Ellis and Sonya Hepinstall

Source Article

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health

Fauci warns of covid-19 surge, offers blunt assessment of Trump’s response

President Trump’s repeated assertions the United States is “rounding the turn” on the novel coronavirus have increasingly alarmed the government’s top health experts, who say the country is heading into a long and potentially deadly winter with an unprepared government unwilling to make tough choices.

39 times Trump said the coronavirus would go away

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“We’re in for a whole lot of hurt. It’s not a good situation,” Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s leading infectious-disease expert, said in a wide-ranging interview late Friday. “All the stars are aligned in the wrong place as you go into the fall and winter season, with people congregating at home indoors. You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

Fauci, a leading member of the government’s coronavirus response, said the United States needed to make an “abrupt change” in public health practices and behaviors. He said the country could surpass 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day and predicted rising deaths in the coming weeks. He spoke as the nation set a new daily record Friday with more than 98,000 cases. As hospitalizations increase, deaths are also ticking up, with more than 1,000 reported Wednesday and Thursday, bringing the total to more than 229,000 since the start of the pandemic, according to health data analyzed by The Washington Post.

Fauci’s blunt warnings come as Trump has rallied in states and cities experiencing record surges in infections and hospitalizations in a last-ditch effort to convince voters he has successfully managed the pandemic. He has held maskless rallies with thousands of supporters, often in violation of local health mandates.

Even as new infections climb in 42 states, Trump has downplayed the virus or mocked those who take it seriously. “Covid-19, covid, covid, covid,” he said during one event, lamenting that the news media gives it too much attention. In another rally, he baselessly said that U.S. doctors record more deaths from covid-19, the disease the coronavirus causes, than other nations because they get more money.

“I mean our doctors are very smart people. So what they do is they say, ‘I’m sorry but everybody dies of covid,’ ” Trump said Friday at a rally in Waterford Township, Mich., without offering any evidence.

Fauci said former vice president Joe Biden’s campaign “is taking it seriously from a public health perspective.” Trump, Fauci said, is “looking at it from a different perspective.” He said that perspective was “the economy and reopening the country.”

[Tracking coronavirus cases across the U.S.]

Fauci, who once took a starring role in the response and briefed the president almost every day as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, described a disjointed response as cases surge. Several current and former senior administration officials said the White House is almost entirely focused on a vaccine, even though experts warn it is unlikely to be a silver bullet that ends the pandemic immediately since it will take months under the best of circumstances to inoculate tens of millions

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health

Nursing home VP says federal inspection diverted resources to COVID response during nation’s first outbreak

The executive in charge of the nursing home where the first known outbreak of coronavirus patients erupted in the U.S. says a federal inspection diverted precious time from her staff’s desperate efforts to care for critically ill residents. Bill Whitaker and his team were the first reporters allowed inside the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, since the outbreak there last February. His report reveals the details of the early stages of a medical emergency that soon grew into a pandemic and the federal government’s bungled response to it. The report will be broadcast on 60 Minutes, Sunday, November 1at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.  

Nancy Butner, a vice president at Life Care Centers of America who ran the Kirkland facility for 14 years, was desperate for more staff. Forty of them, including the medical director, could no longer come to work because they had COVID-19 symptoms. She asked the federal government for an emergency team of doctors and nurses. A team of doctors and nurses did come five days later, but not before the federal government sent a team in to inspect Life Care Center of Kirkland in the middle of the outbreak. “It was infuriating– they didn’t truly understand COVID or what the facility was going through,” Butner tells Whitaker. “Hours of staff time were averted to managing a survey process instead of managing a crisis in the facility and patient care.”    

Life Care Center says inspectors from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services interviewed staff and demanded documentation, diverting 400 hours of staff time away from patient care. “They knew how many staff were lost. They knew how many patients were hospitalized. They knew there was a lot of  patients that were sick and it was an unknown virus,” says Butner. “I explained that to them. But I can’t… tell them to leave.”   

60 Minutes searched hundreds of public documents and turned up emails that show state health officials pressed the governor’s office to call off the inspection. Dr. Jeffery Duchin, the head of outbreak response at Public Health Seattle-King County called the inspection “Not an appropriate use of precious time.” He tells Whitaker he believes the government knew its investigation was taking place during a public health emergency at a critical time. “I don’t have any reason to believe it. That it was a mix-up. I believe it was an intentional decision to conduct a survey at that time.”    

Says Butner, “I think they wanted a scapegoat for what happened at Life Care Center Kirkland. I think that they wanted someone to blame for COVID-19 spreading. We had nothing to do with the spread across the nation.”

60 Minutes wanted to ask Seema Verma, the federal administrator in charge of the inspection, about the timing of the inspection and the findings, but her office declined multiple requests for an on-camera interview.  

Life Care was fined more than $600,000 by the federal government and state inspectors working with federal investigators working with federal investigators found the

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health

SBRT Doubles Pain Response Over Usual RT in Spinal Metastases

A 2-day course of high-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) doubles the complete pain response for patients with painful spinal metastases in comparison with conventional palliative radiotherapy. It is also safe and nondestabilizing, conclude researchers reporting a phase 3 Canadian trial.

“Conventional radiation has historically not achieved high rates of complete response to pain or long-term local control,” commented lead author Arjun Sahgal, MD. “So many years ago, we started building on the idea of using high-dose stereotactic body radiation for the spine.”

Sahgal, who is professor and deputy chief of radiation oncology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, explained that his team came up with a plan to use SBRT with 24 Gy in two fractions. This involves only two consecutive treatments, which is very convenient for patients. Conventional radiation requires five or more sessions.

“Now we have shown a doubling of the complete response rate to pain at 3 and 6 months compared with conventional palliative radiation, and patients appreciate fewer treatment sessions, too, so we are helping our patients financially,” Shagal told Medscape Medical News.

He presented the new results during the virtual annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Patients enrolled in this trial had de novo painful spinal metastases with three or fewer consecutive metastatically involved spinal segments arising from a primary tumor causing pain that was scored at least 2 on the Brief Pain Inventory.

The median baseline worst pain score was 5 in a range of 2 to 10. The median total spinal instability and neoplasia score (SINS) was 7 in a range of 3 to 12, Sahgal noted. “The primary endpoint was complete pain response rate at 3 months,” Sahgal told a press briefing held within the context of the virtual meeting.

Patients were randomly assigned to receive either SBRT with 24 Gy delivered in two fractions over 2 consecutive days or conventional palliative radiotherapy with 20 Gy delivered in five fractions.

Initially, the trial was launched as a phase 2 study, but once investigators could demonstrate that accrual was possible, they converted the trial into a phase 3 study, Sahgal noted.

A total of 114 patients were enrolled in the SBRT arm; 115 patients were enrolled in the conventional radiotherapy arm. All were included in the intent-to-treat analysis. “We found that at 3 months, the complete response rate was 35% in the SBRT arm and 14% in the conventional radiation arm, and the difference was statistically significant,” Sahgal reported.

The complete response rate was sustained at 6 months. It remained at 32% in the SBRT arm and 16% in the conventional radiotherapy arm. There was also a reduction in the total SINS score at 6 months that favored the SBRT arm.

Adjusted for age, sex, performance status, primary cancer, and total baseline SINS, SBRT was almost 3.5-fold more likely to result in a complete pain response rate at 3 months and was about 2.5-fold more likely to yield the same response at 6 months

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health

Canadian Red Cross kickstarts recruitment campaign to build teams for its ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic

Recruitment campaign launches to build additional capacity, initial focus on Ottawa

OTTAWA, Oct. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Canadian Red Cross has launched a nationwide recruitment campaign seeking Canadians who want to make a difference during the COVID-19 pandemic, and beyond. The Red Cross anticipates the need for assistance to increase across sectors as the pandemic persists and communities across the country are experiencing second waves of the virus. The Red Cross continues to work in support of the federal and provincial governments, and is coordinating with local authorities, public health officials, and others as needed to address emerging needs.

QUICK FACTS
The Canadian Red Cross is hiring for a variety of roles as it continues to build care teams to work in many areas across the country. The immediate focus is to build teams to support in long-term care (LTC) homes in Ontario where personnel will work alongside existing staff in the homes to provide assistance to seniors. Red Cross personnel is currently providing essential personal care services and assisting with daily living activities of seniors residing in LTC.

In building effective and strong care teams, Red Cross will:

  • Seek to recruit and train people to join already existing Red Cross personnel in supporting the care of seniors in LTC;

  • Train newly recruited and existing personnel on preventing disease transmission, including the proper use of personal protective equipment; and,

  • Provide emergency equipment supplies, including mobile health clinics, to help augment public health efforts.

QUOTE
“With many communities across the country experiencing a second wave of the pandemic, the Red Cross is well positioned to provide assistance in long-term care homes and beyond. The Red Cross has been supporting efforts across the country since the initial onset of COVID-19. Our recent work of providing comfort and care to seniors in long-term care facilities in Quebec, along with training to prevent disease transmission, will be foundational to this role in Ontario. The Red Cross is ready to further-build its capacity across the country and provide this vital assistance as needs emerge. We encourage Canadians who wish to make a difference to apply.”
Conrad Sauvé, president and CEO, Canadian Red Cross

The Canadian Red Cross has played a significant role in Canada’s response to the global pandemic and has been there from the beginning when it provided support to returning travellers under quarantine in Trenton and Cornwall. The Canadian Red Cross is well-positioned to provide assistance in LTC with expertise led by its Global Health Unit, a team of medical experts who have experience responding to emergencies around the world. In addition, the Red Cross continues to support LTC homes in Quebec where teams have been organizing and delivering personal protective equipment and prevention of disease transmission training, offering technical advice on epidemic prevention and control, as well as providing components of its field hospital to use.

More information on available job opportunities can be found on redcross.ca.

ABOUT THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
Here in

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