Pandemic

medicine

Family Medicine Doctors ‘Forgotten on the Front Lines’ of the Pandemic

When you think of frontline health care workers, doctors and nurses in hospitals might come to mind, but independent family doctors are in that category, too.



a sign on a brick building


© Provided by NBC Dallas


“Forgotten on the front lines is what we are,” said. Dr. Guy Culpepper, founder of Bent Tree Family Physicians.

Culpepper says the front lines of the pandemic aren’t in emergency rooms, they’re at his front door.

“When you talk about flattening the curve, that curve flattening happened in my office,” he said.

From the parking lot of his Frisco office, Culpepper says more than 7,000 people have been tested for COVID-19. Nearly 1,200 have tested positive.

“We’ve kept 1,100 of them away from hospitals and emergency rooms,” Culpepper said.

Culpepper says he has about 250 active COVID-19 patients. Those recovering from home are checked on by phone every day. “We get about 1,500 telephone calls a day,” he said.

His numbers tell a story. They also speak to his heart.

“Part of the passion I have in managing my COVID patients and managing all my patients is the feeling of I’m only here because of them,” Culpepper said, emotionally.

Like many independent doctors, Culpepper closed his doors in the spring and furloughed all 75 employees.

On the verge of going out of business, it was a GoFundMe page set up by patients that helped him get through.

“We’re only kept up by those handful who know us and appreciate us because we know all too well that most of the country doesn’t know the work we’re doing,” Culpepper said.

Culpepper, who’s been in family medicine for 33 years, says no federal programs exist to sustain private physicians, like him. Nationwide, he says his profession is in crisis because private practices, “can’t handle the economics of a pandemic.”

He says nearly 10% of primary care practices that temporarily closed this year have yet to reopen.

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medicine

Are More Women Physicians Leaving Medicine as Pandemic Surges?

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

For mid-career oncologist Tanya Wildes, MD, the pandemic was the last straw. In late September, she tweeted: “I have done the academically unfathomable: I am resigning my faculty position without another job lined up.”

She wasn’t burned out, she insisted. She loved her patients and her research. But she was also “100% confident” in her decision and “also 100% sad. This did not have to happen,” she lamented, asking not to disclose her workplace for fear of retribution.



Dr Tanya Wildes and family

Being a woman in medicine “is a hard life to start with,” Wildes told Medscape Medical News. “We all have that tenuous balance going on and the pandemic made everything just a little bit harder.”

She describes her pre-pandemic work-life balance as a “Jenga tower, with everything only just in place.” But she realized that the balance had tipped, when after a difficult clinic she felt emotionally wrung-out. Her 11-year-old son had asked her to help him fly his model airplane. “I told him, ‘Honey, I can’t do it because if it crashes or gets stuck in a tree…you’re going to be devastated and I have nothing left for you.’ “

This was a eureka moment, as “I realized, this is not who I want to be,” she says, holding back tears. “Seventy years from now my son is going to tell his grandchildren about the pandemic and I don’t want his memory of his mom to be that she couldn’t be there for him because she was too spent.”

When Wildes shared her story on Twitter, other women oncologists and physicians responded that they too have felt they’re under increased pressure this year, with the extra stress of the pandemic leading others to quit as well.

The trend of doctors leaving medicine has been noticeable. A July survey from the Physicians Foundation found that roughly 16,000 medical practices had already closed during the pandemic, with another 8000 predicted to close within the next year.

“Similar patterns” were evident in another analysis by the Larry A. Green Center and the Primary Care Collaborative, as reported by The New York Times. In that survey, nearly one fifth of primary care clinicians said “someone in their practice plans to retire early or has already retired because of COVID-19,” and 15% say “someone has left or plans to leave the practice.” About half said their mental exhaustion was at an all-time high, the survey found.



Dr Monica Bertagnolli

“COVID-19 is a burden, and that added burden has tipped people over the edge of many things,” acknowledges Monica Bertagnolli, MD, chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and former president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

“It has illustrated that we do have a lot of people who are working kind of on the edge of not being able to handle everything,” she says.

While many

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medicine

Exercise is medicine, even in the middle of a pandemic

Maimonides (Rambam), the great 12th century Torah scholar and physician, sums up the Jewish attitude toward exercise: “As long as a person exercises and exerts himself…sickness does not befall him and his strength increases…. But one who is idle and does not exercise…even if he eats healthy foods and maintains healthy habits, all his days will be of ailment and his strength will diminish.” The Rambam defined exercise as “vigorous or gentle movement, or a combination of the two, which increases one’s breathing rate.” Interestingly, this is exactly the type of cardiovascular exercise advised by modern medicine – like walking, jogging, dancing, biking, or swimming for 30 minutes at least three times a week.However, social distancing, self-quarantining, and the closure of many gyms have made it harder to exercise. In desperation, many people have turned to walking or jogging outdoors – not permitted in Israel during the first lockdown — while others have found benefit in turning to online workouts. During the first wave, my wife and I did in fact discover a very good online exercise program.Certainly, the physical benefits of exercise are many: increased strength and stamina, fitness, speed and power as well as aesthetic appeal. In addition, over the past 20 years, hundreds of studies have shown that exercise provides numerous emotional benefits such as lowering depression and anxiety and improving overall self-esteem and confidence. In fact, I would argue that regular exercise is a vital coping tool in dealing with the multitude of problems, challenges and stressors that are part of everyday life.Below I list a few of the emotional and physical benefits of exercise.1. When you exercise, your brain produces endorphins (endogenous morphine) that block the feelings of pain and create feelings of euphoria by attaching to receptors on the outer surfaces of brain cells.2. Exercise also increases the production of serotonin and norepinephrine (adrenaline), which is the neurotransmitter in the brain that is associated with all kinds of psychological disorders. Researchers have established that individuals experiencing depression tend to have lower levels of serotonin and adrenaline in their blood. Through exercise, these neurotransmitters are increased and help people to feel less depressed, more optimistic, less worried and more confident.

3. During the COVID-19 pandemic: Exercise boosts the immune system. Research shows that regular, moderate-intensity exercise has immune-boosting benefits that may reduce symptoms of illnesses and disease, ranging from cancer to the common cold. Even arthritis and gastrointestinal disorders are relieved through exercise.4. Exercise allows you to express your frustrations, disappointments, anger, and negative energy in a positive way. Psychologically and physically, exercise gives you more energy and confidence to improve your relationships with family and friends and problem-solve more effectively.5. Exercise increases self-confidence, which positively affects your professional, personal and social lives.6. Exercise shows your kids the importance of being healthy and fit. You’ll be a positive role model. The emotional benefits of exercise can reach your children and beyond.7.

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dentist

Dentist offices remain ‘extremely safe’ during coronavirus pandemic

Cesareo Contreras
 
| MetroWest Daily News

ASHLAND –  More than nine months into the coronavirus pandemic, many local businesses are still struggling to get by. But for Dr. Sandra Cove, who owns a dental office at 37 Main St., business has been great.  

“People are knocking the door down,” she said. 

The anxiety of the pandemic is weighing down on many. And that is often reflected on oral health, Cove said.

It’s not uncommon for Cove to see people around the holidays come in with problems, given the stress during this time of year. She is seeing patients with major dental issues at a rate she has never seen in her career. 

From cavities and inflamed gums to chipped and infected teeth, the issues are various.  

“We have this phenomenon in dentistry. Whenever people are under a lot of stress, a lot crazy things happen – a lot of root canals and broken teeth,” she said. “A lot of this stuff happens around Christmas time and Thanksgiving and it only lasts for a week or two, but this going on for six months, where every day, I must have two or three broken teeth due to stress or people gums are completely on fire because they are overreacting to the bacteria because their defenses are down.” 

Dr. MaryJane Hanlon, president of the Massachusetts Dental Society, said she isn’t surprised by number of patients Cove has seen with new and serious dental problems.  

“Sandra, I know, is very busy, and many practices are busy,” she said. “Some practices never slowed down. They saw a lot of emergency care. … The bottom line is that we are seeing a breakdown because people were very concerned about going to the dentist. ” 

While some dental offices are doing well, others have been hit hard.  

Hanlon is the dean of operations at Tufts University and manages all of the school’s clinical operations. Unlike Cove, she said she has seen a decline in the number of people visiting the clinic. Before the pandemic, the college would see around 600 people a day. Now they are seeing half of that. 

In June, the association conducted a survey to better understand how dental offices in the state were faring during the pandemic. The survey was taken by more than 400 dental practice owners. 

More than half of responders said they expect it to take between seven months to over a year to get the number of patients they had before the pandemic hit. 

Nearly 90% of dental practices are spending between $8 – $29 or greater per patient on personal protective equipment, according to survey. 

Moreover, more than half or respondents said the pandemic has cost their practice $225,000 in office upgrades and loss in patients. 

Cove said she thinks a big reason why people are coming to her office is because they feel reassured that the appropriate measures are in place to keep them safe from the coronavirus. 

After the start of pandemic in March, Cove

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fitness

Philadelphia Fitness Coalition protesting restrictions on city gyms amid coronavirus pandemic

More than two dozen gyms in Philadelphia are joining forces, demanding that the city allows them to reopen.

Philly Fitness Coalition is fighing the restrictions for gyms in the city

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

They have created the Philadelphia Fitness Coalition and have gathered more than 1,500 signatures in opposition to the new restrictions.

As the number of covid-19 cases rises, the city required gyms to shut down indoor activities at the end of last week.

But gym owners say it is unfair because of the safety precautions they have put in place.

They plan to protest outside of City Hall on Tuesday.

Last week, the city’s top health official, Dr. Thomas Farley, defended the city’s decision to tighten restrictions, saying now is the riskiest time for the transmission of the virus.

“What was now safe is now dangerous with the change in the weather. Many businesses feel they put safety measures in place, sure they have, and I’m sure there’s no spread there and that’s true in many places. Remember, there are more people than ever with the virus,” said Farley.

City officials said dramatic action is needed to respond to an exponential growth in cases and hospitalizations.

On Thursday, health officials announced 765 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Philadelphia. That brings the number of confirmed cases to 57,237.

The number of residents who have died from the virus in Philadelphia is 1,945.

How is 2nd wave of COVID-19 impacting local hospitals?

As the second wave of COVID-19 hits the Philadelphia region, doctors and medical professionals discuss how the virus is impacting hospitals.

Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair closing

The new round of COVID-19 regulations was the final straw for one Philadelphia restaurant. The Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair is closing its doors for good after 70 years in business. The Lucky Cat Brewing Company, which is a standalone business inside the pub, will remain open.

Philadelphia museums knocked back down by new COVID-19 restrictions

The new restrictions put in place to tackle the surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia are hitting museums in the area hard. After going through a five-month shutdown during the first wave, they are being shut down again, which in some cases, will cause hard economic pain and uncertainty for employees.

National Constitution Center temporarily closes to the public through January 1, 2021

In accordance with health guidelines from the City of Philadelphia in response to COVID-19, the National Constitution Center is temporarily closed to the public through January 1, 2021. The Center offers a range of free online programs and resources for learners of all ages. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Houses of worship in Philly vow to persevere amid new COVID restrictions

The new COVID-19 restrictions in Philadelphia will have a major impact on houses of worship, which for the time being can operate at only 5% capacity. While the Archdiocese of Philadelphia revises its guidance, some churches and synagogues in the city have a variety of innovative plans

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fitness

Philadelphia COVID-19 today: Philadelphia Fitness Coalition protesting gym closures in city amid coronavirus pandemic

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — More than two dozen gyms in Philadelphia are joining forces, demanding that the city allows them to reopen.

They have created the Philadelphia Fitness Coalition and have gathered more than 1,500 signatures in opposition to the new restrictions.

As the number of covid-19 cases rises, the city required gyms to shut down indoor activities at the end of last week.

But gym owners say it is unfair because of the safety precautions they have put in place.

They plan to protest outside of City Hall on Tuesday.

Last week, the city’s top health official, Dr. Thomas Farley, defended the city’s decision to tighten restrictions, saying now is the riskiest time for the transmission of the virus.

“What was now safe is now dangerous with the change in the weather. Many businesses feel they put safety measures in place, sure they have, and I’m sure there’s no spread there and that’s true in many places. Remember, there are more people than ever with the virus,” said Farley.

City officials said dramatic action is needed to respond to an exponential growth in cases and hospitalizations.

On Thursday, health officials announced 765 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Philadelphia. That brings the number of confirmed cases to 57,237.

The number of residents who have died from the virus in Philadelphia is 1,945.

How is 2nd wave of COVID-19 impacting local hospitals?

As the second wave of COVID-19 hits the Philadelphia region, doctors and medical professionals discuss how the virus is impacting hospitals.

Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair closing

The new round of COVID-19 regulations was the final straw for one Philadelphia restaurant. The Grey Lodge Pub in Mayfair is closing its doors for good after 70 years in business. The Lucky Cat Brewing Company, which is a standalone business inside the pub, will remain open.

Philadelphia museums knocked back down by new COVID-19 restrictions


The new restrictions put in place to tackle the surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia are hitting museums in the area hard. After going through a five-month shutdown during the first wave, they are being shut down again, which in some cases, will cause hard economic pain and uncertainty for employees.

National Constitution Center temporarily closes to the public through January 1, 2021

In accordance with health guidelines from the City of Philadelphia in response to COVID-19, the National Constitution Center is temporarily closed to the public through January 1, 2021. The Center offers a range of free online programs and resources for learners of all ages. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Houses of worship in Philly vow to persevere amid new COVID restrictions


The new COVID-19 restrictions in Philadelphia will have a major impact on houses of worship, which for the time being can operate at only 5% capacity. While the Archdiocese of Philadelphia revises its guidance, some churches and synagogues in the city have a variety of innovative plans to carry on through the holidays.

Philadelphia-area stores stock up as new COVID restrictions set

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fitness

Smart Fitness Device Market Research Expansion (2020-2029) Including COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact | Apple Inc., Xiaomi

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 20, 2020 (WiredRelease via Comtex) —
A consciously conceived and designed business intelligence report titled Global Smart Fitness Device market 2020 by Manufacturers, Type, and Application, Forecast to 2029 by MarketResearch.biz discloses a succinct analysis of the regional spectrum, market size, and revenue forecast about the market. This report sheds light on the vital developments along with other events happening in the global Smart Fitness Device market which is marking on the enlargement and opening doors for outlook growth in the coming years.

This is the latest report, covering the current COVID-19/Corona Virus pandemic impact on the market which has affected every aspect of life globally. This has brought along several changes in market conditions and the Business areas. The rapidly changing market scenario and initial and future assessment of the impact are covered in the Smart Fitness Device market report. 

For All-Inclusive Information: Download a FREE sample copy of Smart Fitness Device Market Report Study 2020-2029 at https://marketresearch.biz/report/smart-fitness-device-market/request-sample

(Our FREE SAMPLE COPY of the report gives a brief introduction to the research report outlook, list of tables and figures, Impact Analysis of COVID-19, TOC, an outlook to key players of the market and comprising key regions.)

Competitive Analysis:

The major companies are exceedingly focused on innovation in Smart Fitness Device production technology to enhance ledge life and efficiency. The best long-term development path for Smart Fitness Device market can be caught by guaranteeing financial pliancy to invest in the optimal strategies and current process improvement.

Key manufacturers are included based on the company profile, sales data and product specifications, etc: Apple Inc., Xiaomi, Garmin Ltd, Jawbone, LG Electronics, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, Sony Mobile Communications Inc., MAD Apparel, Inc., Sony Corporation, Nike Inc.

Each manufacturer or Smart Fitness Device market player’s growth rate, gross profit margin, and revenue figures is provided in a tabular, simple format for few years and an individual section on Smart Fitness Device market recent development such as collaboration, mergers, acquisition, and any new service or new product launching in the market is offered.

Smart Fitness Device Market Segmentation Outlook By product, type, and region:

Global smart fitness device market segmentation by product:
Smartwatch
Wristband
Smart clothing
Smart shoes
Bike computers
Others

Global smart fitness device market segmentation by type:
Head-wear
Torso-wear
Hand-wear
Leg-wear
Bike mount

Download Now And Browse Complete Information On The COVID 19 Impact Analysis On Smart Fitness Device Market: https://marketresearch.biz/report/smart-fitness-device-market/covid-19-impact

Regional Analysis:On the idea of geography, the Smart Fitness Device Market report covers statistics for a couple of geographies inclusive of, North America (U.S., Mexico, Canada) South America (Argentina, Brazil) The Middle East & Africa (South Africa, Saudi Arabia) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia) Europe (U.K., Spain, Italy, Germany, France, Russia)

In addition, The following years considered for this study to forecast the global Smart Fitness Device market size are as follows:

– Actual Year: 2019

– Estimated Year: 2020

– Forecast Year: 2020–2029

Some

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medicine

No shutdowns: Abbott banks on medicine, vigilance to counter pandemic – News – Austin American-Statesman

With coronavirus infections surging in Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott traveled Thursday to Lubbock, a pandemic hot spot, to promote the state’s distribution of a new antibody therapy designed to limit the strain on hospitals.

The emphasis from now on, Abbott said, will be on improved treatment options plus an appeal to Texans to limit exposure by wearing face coverings, avoiding crowds — including extended family and friends — and keeping a safe distance from others in public.

“Statewide, we’re not going to have another shutdown,” Abbott said, adding that his previous orders forcing businesses to close and limiting the movement of people had severe consequences for the mental, physical and financial health of Texans.

Large social gatherings, not people going to work, are among the most common ways to spread COVID-19, he said.

“Shutdowns will not lead to the positive results that some people think,” Abbott said during a news conference at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

As the number of COVID-19 deaths in Texas neared 20,000 and hospitalizations continued a steady rise since early October, Democrats criticized Abbott’s approach as dangerously weak.

“I hope this new treatment is successful and saves lives, but Gov. Abbott should return power to local leaders so they can take decisive action to curb the rampant spread of COVID-19 in their communities,” said state Rep. Chris Turner, D-Grand Prairie and chairman of the House Democratic Caucus.

“The governor should get out of the way and let local leaders take measures to protect their communities,” Turner said.

Abbott called his first pandemic-related news conference in several weeks to tout the arrival of a monoclonal antibody therapy by Eli Lilly & Co. that will be distributed to hospitals across Texas, beginning with hot spot areas like Lubbock, El Paso and Amarillo.

Nursing homes and other sites should receive doses in the future as supplies get shipped to Texas from the federal government, he said.

Intended for those with early-stage COVID-19 and other health problems that put them at greater risk, the intravenous drug has been effective at keeping patients out of hospitals, which are under a growing strain in the current spike of infections, Abbott said.

Supplies of a second antibody therapy should begin flowing soon, Abbott said, adding that the state also is preparing to distribute two vaccines that could become available as early as December.

“The cavalry is coming,” Abbott said.

Thursday’s news conference did not include Lubbock County Judge Curtis Parrish, who tested positive for COVID-19 prior to Abbott’s visit. Parrish said he did not have “any of the major symptoms” and would continue working from home.

In late June and early July, when Texas was in the midst of a similar sharp rise in infections and hospitalizations, Abbott closed bars, reduced restaurant capacity and issued a face mask mandate in counties with more than 20 positive COVID-19 cases.

But unlike some Democratic governors who are tapping the brakes on reopening efforts as infections climb nationwide, Abbott said he’s banking on

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fitness

Maine Pines Racquet & Fitness adapts, evolves during pandemic

Tennis players wear masks and socially distance while playing at Maine Pines in Brunswick last week. Eli Canfield/The Times Record

 

BRUNSWICK — Barbara Fraumeni acknowledged it took a little time to get used to playing tennis while masked up, as is the requirement at Maine Pines Racquet & Fitness these days. 

Slowly, however, wearing a mask felt more natural than uncomfortable.

“It was a little tough in the beginning, but now I’m used to it and sometimes even forget it’s on,” said Fraumeni, of Brunswick. “I’ve noticed that the paper masks suit me better than the cloth masks while I’m exercising.”

Fellow tennis player and Brunswick native Bill Elmore said he, too, needed time to adjust.

“I guess my biggest issue is that my glasses tend to fog up, but I would rather be safe than sorry,” Elmore said.

Like many businesses in the state, Maine Pines Racquet & Fitness felt the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. 

A pickleball court has been set up for use at Maine Pines in Brunswick. Eli Canfield/The Times Record

Maine Pines closed for three months, from mid-March to June, which prompted owner Rob Manter to brainstorm creative ways he could safely re-open his business.

“We spent that time deep cleaning our facility, and designing our safety protocol plans to make upgrades to follow the protocols that were established,” he said. 

The facility opened in the summer and hopes to keep its doors open even as the pandemic shows no signs of easing. Manter said Maine Pines has made some changes to meet COVID-19 safety guidelines.   

Maine Pines has five tennis courts open, down one from its usual operations. 

The sixth court was transformed into a new fitness center, complete with weights, ladders and ropes. People can also play pickleball, with two courts set aside for use.

“The biggest challenge with adding the fitness center to the courts was finding the proper noise level to accommodate everyone,” Manter said. “When you have tennis players wanting it to be quiet to focus, and members in the fitness center playing loud music while working out, we had to find a happy medium between each party.”

Manter added several new fans and air purifiers throughout the facility, plexiglass at the desk in the lobby, and hand sanitizing stations in the lobby and at the net on each tennis court. There is also a self temperature check as you walk in the door.

Manter says he’s pleased with the number of people who are showing up to play tennis.  

“We’re hoping more people will come out and see that they can play tennis or work out safely and comfortably,” Manter said.

Masks must be worn at all times while in a public setting, including while exercising.

A whiteboard displays a sign-in at the doorstep of the gym at Maine Pines in Brunswick. Eli Canfield/The Times Record

Jason Terry, the club’s tennis pro, has had to adjust how he approaches his lessons and clinics during the pandemic.

“For the most

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fitness

Newswire Supports Fitness Companies as They Educate Americans on Wellness During Unprecedented Pandemic – Press Release

With gyms and health centers facing difficulties this winter, many fitness leaders are turning toward online content to educate both businesses and individuals.


NEW YORK – November 17, 2020 – (Newswire.com)

​Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour has acted as a reliable resource for fitness companies that are looking to stay in front of their target audience with educational material and virtual workouts. This will be increasingly valuable with the American people likely heading into another lockdown period this winter; leaders in the fitness industry have already begun to pivot their communications strategies to remain relevant. 

“Information sessions and online content will be crucial for fitness companies in the months to come, as tactics related to virtual experiences and in-person safety will give gyms, yoga studios, and wellness centers a chance to stay in business during the unpredictable winter months,” said Charlie Terenzio, Newswire’s VP Earned Media Advantage Business. 

This past summer, many gyms across the U.S. were allowed to re-open at limited capacities. This provided fitness enthusiasts with the opportunity to get back to working out in a public setting, and it provided gym owners with the chance to generate revenue after an extended period of forced closures. 

Pamela Kufahl, Content Director for Club Industry, noted in a recent article how UKactive, Europeactive, IHRSA, FIT Summit, and Mercado Fitness will have speakers present during the global Future of Fitness virtual event. The sessions will feature discussions regarding the challenges that the fitness industry faces as a whole, and speakers will provide insight to businesses looking to survive and thrive in the months to come. 

Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour Market Builder supplies fitness professionals and C-suite executives with the ability to launch educational content campaigns to help position their brand as an industry leader for trending approaches to modern fitness. 

Fitness companies have used Newswire’s EMA GT Market Builder to educate fellow executives as the industry looks to survive as a whole. The platform has also been effective in distributing relevant information regarding new mobile apps and at-home workouts for gym-goers that may be reluctant to exercise in public spaces as the pandemic progresses this winter.  

Learn how Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour Market Builder can help your brand gain a competitive advantage through industry leadership today.

About Newswire

Newswire delivers press release and multimedia distribution software and services (SaaS) that empower the Earned Media Advantage: greater brand awareness, increased traffic, greater return on media and marketing communications spend and the competitive edge. With over a decade of experience, Newswire continues to provide its customers with the ability to deliver the right message to the right audience at the right time through the right medium.

To learn more about how Newswire can help you, visit http://www.newswire.com.

Contact Information

Charlie Terenzio
VP of Earned Media Advantage Business 
Newswire
Office: 813-480-3766
Email: [email protected]

Press Release Service
by
Newswire.com

Original Source:

Newswire Supports Fitness Companies as They Educate Americans on Wellness During Unprecedented Pandemic

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