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School of Nursing and Rehabilitation of Shandong University Inaugurated

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The School of Nursing and Rehabilitation of SDU was inaugurated
The School of Nursing and Rehabilitation of SDU was inaugurated
The School of Nursing and Rehabilitation of SDU was inaugurated

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The inauguration of the new School
The inauguration of the new School
The inauguration of the new School

SHANDONG, China, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — On October 20th, the School of Nursing and Rehabilitation was inaugurated on the Baotuquan Campus of Shandong University.

Guo Xinli, Secretary of the CPC Shandong University Committee said that nursing and rehabilitation, a field with promising prospects and tremendous potential in China, were a key sector in China’s health service system and health industry. He hopes that by sticking to first-rate standards and striving to attain world-class quality, the School of Nursing and Rehabilitation will become a cradle for fostering talent, a platform for innovation and a center of teaching, research and development.

Shandong University is known to be one of the originating universities of China’s higher education on nursing. It is among China’s first batch of first-level doctoral programs and master programs on nursing, having cultivated a large number of leading nursing talents and won high recognition from the public.

According to Wang Kefang, dean of the School of Nursing and Rehabilitation, the School will cooperate with first-rate universities at home and abroad to consolidate its advantageous resources in nursing and rehabilitation, reshape its disciplinary layout, and cultivate its top disciplinary growth. Moreover, it will promote innovation on plural or multiple talent cultivation models, like the “nursing plus” and micro majors, and organize its faculties with full-time teachers as pillar strength supported by external teaching resources. It will encourage closer cooperation from development, teaching and research to turn out more scientific research results, and introduce a coordinated working mechanism for better university-school and industry-teaching integration.

The School of Nursing and Rehabilitation, established on the basis of faculties and researchers of the former School of Nursing, is an independent teaching and research unit directly attached to the University, but integrating resources from clinical units and strategic partners such as Qilu Hospital and the Second Hospital of Shandong University.

Two photos accompanying this announcement are available at:
https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/904db359-3a92-4389-94c9-5b661b86fa64
https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/4a90ff33-1f80-416e-abc2-cec1cd3688be

Contact:

Xie Tingting
+86 15063349812
[email protected] 

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Coronavirus-laden nursing home loses federal Medicare funding

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after an investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths.

An onsite investigation at Andbe Home, Inc. in Norton, Kansas, revealed noncompliance with federal requirements for long-term care facilities, according to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) documents obtained by Fox News. 

The survey investigation by the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services cited “widespread immediate jeopardy” to resident health and safety, according to the documents. The facility was also slammed with a $14,860 federal civil money penalty while it worked to correct noncompliance back in May.

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 
(iStock)

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Stephen Crystal, director of the Center for Health Services Research at the Rutgers Institute for Health, told Fox News that the move marks CMS’ “ultimate penalty; decertifying a facility.”

“Most of the time, they try very hard do other things before they go to that step [like civil monetary penalties],” he said, adding “CMS actually doesn’t do this very often, and one could argue that they haven’t moved quickly enough on other facilities that had out of control spread,” referencing New Jersey and New York as examples.

In the case of the Kansas facility, staff identified two symptomatic patients on Oct. 5 and confirmed positive test results two days later but failed to separate them from the rest of the residents.

‘ALARMING RATE’ OF CORONAVIRUS INFECTION AMONG GROCERY STORE WORKERS, STUDY FINDS

“During this time, COVID-19 positive residents cohorted with COVID-19 negative residents, with only a curtain between them, against [Centers for Disease and Prevention Control] guidelines and best practice to prevent the spread of highly contagious COVID-19,” said the documents obtained by Fox News. The facility also allowed communal dining for two days after they discovered the symptomatic patients.

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus, every single one testing positive, which led to one hospitalization and 10 deaths. By Oct. 19, 37 staff members tested positive.

Crystal wasn’t privy to all the details but upon a brief account said, “It sounds pretty egregious.” 

The facility’s administrator, Megan Mapes, received a notice of a 23-day involuntary termination of the Medicare provider agreement: “We have determined that Andbe Home, Inc. no longer meets the requirements for participation as a skilled nursing facility in the Medicare program under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act.”

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 
(iStock)

The termination will go into effect Nov. 18, 2020.

CMS informed Mapes that the Medicare program won’t pay for covered services to patients admitted to the facility on or after Oct. 27, 2020. Medicare will cover patients admitted before that date for up to 30 days “to ensure residents are successfully relocated.”

The facility was

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Study: 30% of nursing facilities in COVID-19 ‘hot spots’ wait 3 days or more for test results

Oct. 30 (UPI) — Nearly one-third of skilled nursing facilities situated in COVID-19 hot spots across the United States still are waiting three days or more for virus test results for staff and residents as of the end of September, according to a report published Friday by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nationally, just under 40% of all of these facilities — which including residential and rehabilitation centers staffed with nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists and audiologists — indicated that it took three days or more to receive COVID-19 test results for residents and staff, the data showed.

The findings were as of Sept. 27, or more than two months after Medicare began to distribute rapid, point-of-care tests to generate results in one day or less to these facilities, the researchers said.

While the number of facilities receiving test results in a day or less doubled in some areas during September, researchers say the progress is not sufficient enough.

“Rapid testing turnaround is critical to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes — and elsewhere — but only a tiny fraction of homes have access to turnaround that is less than one day,” study co-author Dr. Michael L. Barnett told UPI.

“With slower turnaround, staff with COVID-19 and no symptoms will circulate in a facility and spread infection before the positive test comes back,” said Barnett, assistant professor of health policy and management at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

Nursing homes and assisted-living facilities across the country were hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in the spring, accounting for 40% of all virus-related deaths nationally, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

As a result, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began to distribute “rapid” virus testing kits to these facilities in July. The tests could be administered on-site and provide results in one day or less, agency officials said.

The agency requires facilities located in areas with low rates — less than 5% — of COVID-19 transmission to test residents and staff members monthly.

However, those based in hot spots — with up to 10% or more of virus transmission — should be testing staff and residents at least twice weekly, according to officials.

For this analysis, Barnett and his colleagues analyzed data from 15,065 — or 98% — of the skilled nursing facilities included in the Medicare COVID-19 Nursing Home Database. The database is a federally mandated weekly assessment of all Medicare-certified facilities, to examine facility-reported test result turnaround time.

As of Sept. 27, 14% of all facilities nationally said they received COVID-19 test results for staff members in one day or less, up from 6.2% three weeks earlier, the data showed.

By that same date, 10% of facilities reported getting test results for residents in one day or less, an increase from 5% earlier in the month.

In “hot spot counties” — with high rates of community spread of the virus — the number of facilities that reported test turnaround of one day or

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Wealthier hospitals stockpiling N95 masks leave nursing homes scrambling

Nursing homes, small physician offices and rural clinics are being left behind in the rush for N95 masks and other protective gear, exposing some of the country’s most vulnerable populations and their caregivers to COVID-19 while larger, wealthier health care facilities build equipment stockpiles.

Take Rhonda Bergeron, who owns three health clinics in rural southern Louisiana. She said she’s been desperate for personal protective equipment since her clinics became COVID testing sites. Her plight didn’t impress national suppliers puzzled by her lack of buying history when she asked for 500 gowns. And one supply company allows her only one box of 200 gloves per 30 days for her three clinics. Right now, she doesn’t have any large gloves on-site.

“So in the midst of the whole world shutting down, you can’t get PPE to cover your own employees,” she said. “They’re refilling stuff to larger corporations when realistically we are truly the front line here.”

More than eight months into the pandemic, health care leaders are again calling for a coordinated national strategy to distribute personal protective equipment to protect health care workers and their patients as a new wave of disease wells up across most of the country. The demand for such gear, especially in hot spots, can be more than 10 times the pre-pandemic levels. While supply chains have adjusted, and the availability of PPE has improved dramatically since the mayhem of the spring, limited factories and quantities of raw materials still constrain supply amid the ongoing high demand.

In this free-market scramble, larger hospitals and other providers are stockpiling what they can even while others struggle. Some facilities are scooping up supplies to prepare for a feared wave of COVID-19 hospitalizations; others are following new stockpiling laws and orders in states such as California, New York and Connecticut.

“They’re putting additional strain on what’s still a fragile hospital supply chain,” said Soumi Saha, vice president of advocacy for Premier Inc., a group-purchasing organization that procures supplies for over 4,000 U.S. hospitals and health systems of various sizes. “We want available product to go to front-line health care workers and not go into a warehouse right now.”

Related: A second surge of the coronavirus in the fall and winter could be catastrophic for the U.S. It’s not just more sick people that doctors worry about.

Over a quarter of nursing homes in the country reported a shortage of items such as N95 masks, gloves or gowns from Aug. 24 through Sept. 20. A recent survey from the American Medical Association found 36 percent of physician offices reported having a difficult time securing PPE. And about 90 percent of nonprofit Get Us PPE’s recent requests for help with protective gear have come from non-hospital facilities, such as nursing homes, group homes and homeless shelters.

“I can completely understand that large health systems don’t want to find themselves short on PPE,” said Dr. Ali Raja, co-founder of Get Us PPE and executive vice chairman of emergency medicine at

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Nursing home VP says federal inspection diverted resources to COVID response during nation’s first outbreak

The executive in charge of the nursing home where the first known outbreak of coronavirus patients erupted in the U.S. says a federal inspection diverted precious time from her staff’s desperate efforts to care for critically ill residents. Bill Whitaker and his team were the first reporters allowed inside the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, since the outbreak there last February. His report reveals the details of the early stages of a medical emergency that soon grew into a pandemic and the federal government’s bungled response to it. The report will be broadcast on 60 Minutes, Sunday, November 1at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.  

Nancy Butner, a vice president at Life Care Centers of America who ran the Kirkland facility for 14 years, was desperate for more staff. Forty of them, including the medical director, could no longer come to work because they had COVID-19 symptoms. She asked the federal government for an emergency team of doctors and nurses. A team of doctors and nurses did come five days later, but not before the federal government sent a team in to inspect Life Care Center of Kirkland in the middle of the outbreak. “It was infuriating– they didn’t truly understand COVID or what the facility was going through,” Butner tells Whitaker. “Hours of staff time were averted to managing a survey process instead of managing a crisis in the facility and patient care.”    

Life Care Center says inspectors from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services interviewed staff and demanded documentation, diverting 400 hours of staff time away from patient care. “They knew how many staff were lost. They knew how many patients were hospitalized. They knew there was a lot of  patients that were sick and it was an unknown virus,” says Butner. “I explained that to them. But I can’t… tell them to leave.”   

60 Minutes searched hundreds of public documents and turned up emails that show state health officials pressed the governor’s office to call off the inspection. Dr. Jeffery Duchin, the head of outbreak response at Public Health Seattle-King County called the inspection “Not an appropriate use of precious time.” He tells Whitaker he believes the government knew its investigation was taking place during a public health emergency at a critical time. “I don’t have any reason to believe it. That it was a mix-up. I believe it was an intentional decision to conduct a survey at that time.”    

Says Butner, “I think they wanted a scapegoat for what happened at Life Care Center Kirkland. I think that they wanted someone to blame for COVID-19 spreading. We had nothing to do with the spread across the nation.”

60 Minutes wanted to ask Seema Verma, the federal administrator in charge of the inspection, about the timing of the inspection and the findings, but her office declined multiple requests for an on-camera interview.  

Life Care was fined more than $600,000 by the federal government and state inspectors working with federal investigators working with federal investigators found the

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CMS, Verma imposed few penalties at nursing homes despite promises of tough enforcement

The federal agency and its state partners, Verma said, would conduct a series of newly strengthened inspections to ensure 15,400 Medicare-certified nursing homes were heeding long-standing regulations meant to prevent the spread of communicable diseases. It was another key component of a national effort, launched in early March, to shore up safety protocols for the country’s most fragile residents during an unprecedented health emergency .

But the government inspectors deployed by CMS during the first six months of the crisis cleared nearly 8 in 10 nursing homes of any infection-control violations even as the deadliest pandemic to strike the United States in a century sickened and killed thousands, a Washington Post investigation found.

Those cleared included homes with mounting coronavirus outbreaks before or during the inspections, as well as those that saw cases and deaths spiral upward after inspectors reported no violations had been found, in some cases multiple times. All told, homes that received a clean bill of health earlier this year had about 290,000 coronavirus cases and 43,000 deaths among residents and staff, state and federal data shows.

That death toll constitutes roughly two-thirds of all covid-19 fatalities linked to nursing homes from March through August.

Patient watchdog groups acknowledge that not every outbreak could have been prevented, even with adequate infection-control practices in place. But as the pandemic raged, the number of homes flagged for infection-control violations remained about the same as last year.

The facilities that were cited for breakdowns often escaped significant penalties, The Post also found.

Inspectors reported violations at about 3,500 homes, ranging from dirty medical equipment to a lack of social distancing. Though federal law allows CMS to levy fines of roughly $22,000 for each day a serious violation lingers, most providers were fined little or nothing at all.

For failing to ensure staff members wore masks, Sterling Place in Baton Rouge, with more than 80 coronavirus cases and 15 deaths, was fined $3,250.

For failing to separate residents in a common area, Heritage Hall in Leesburg, Va., with more than 100 cases and about 18 deaths, was fined $5,000.

For failing to use protective gear, the Broomall Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Pennsylvania, with more than 200 cases and about 50 deaths — among the highest nursing home death counts in the country — was fined $9,750.

Broomall spokesperson Annaliese Impink attributed the lapses to “covid fatigue” and said staff members are corrected when concerns crop up. Officials with Sterling Place and Heritage Hall did not return calls seeking comment. In its written response to the inspection, Heritage Hall said tables had been rearranged and a nursing supervisor would monitor for compliance. Heritage Hall went on to suffer a second deadly outbreak last month, state records show.

The inspections follow a three-year push at CMS to ease rules long considered burdensome to the nursing home industry, whose lobbyists and leaders include former politicians and government insiders. Even before the coronavirus crisis, the agency took steps to limit the use of some

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Providence Names Sylvain Trepanier as Chief Nursing Officer

Providence Names Sylvain Trepanier as Chief Nursing Officer

PR Newswire

RENTON, Wash., Oct. 29, 2020

RENTON, Wash., Oct. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Providence, one of the largest health systems in the country, today announced that Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021.

Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021
Sylvain “Syl” Trepanier, D.N.P., R.N., will serve as the organization’s new system-wide chief nursing officer (CNO), effective January 1, 2021

As the new CNO, Syl will be a critical voice for nursing at the senior executive level, advocating for nurses and advanced practitioners while supporting the practice of nursing across the health system’s seven-state footprint. He will play a meaningful role in setting the system’s clinical strategy and will be at the center of workforce planning. One of Syl’s earliest responsibilities will be continuing to build momentum for Providence’s Nursing Institute and Clinical Academy, programs that provide a sustained talent pipeline of specialty nurses, nurse practitioners and clinicians.

“The CNO serves as a champion for our nurses and the invaluable role they play caring for the people in our communities, as well as ensuring we are attracting and retaining the most skilled and compassionate nurses. I know Syl will do both,” said executive vice president and chief clinical officer, Amy Compton-Phillips, M.D., to whom he will report. “With 30,000 nurses, we have a unique opportunity to show how nurses are at the heart of our mission and helping achieve our vision of health for a better world.”

Syl is currently serving as the chief clinical executive for Providence’s Southern California region. His work reduced clinical variation across the region, making Providence Southern California one of the safest places to receive care. Additionally, Syl helped lead the COVID-19 response. “Our region’s COVID-19 response demonstrates how the sharing of expertise across our system results in top-quality care, innovation and increased collaboration. I am excited to continue this work with my nursing colleagues across the Providence family of organizations,” said Syl.  

Syl will follow Deb Burton, Ph.D., R.N., who will retire at the end of 2020 after serving 12 years as the CNO for Providence. Under Deb’s leadership, Providence’s successful nursing workforce development programs have gained national recognition. The Clinical Academy, a year-long program designed to launch the careers of new graduate nurses into 22 different clinical specialties, resulted in a reduction in first-year nursing turnover from 25% to roughly 9% today. Deb also led efforts to grow distance-based academic nursing and clinical programs through the University of Providence.

Prior to joining Providence Southern California in 2017, Syl served as system vice president and chief nursing officer for Premier Health in Dayton, Ohio. He also held leadership roles at Tenet in Dallas and at hospitals in South Florida. He has a doctorate in nursing from Texas Tech University, a Master of Science in Nursing, and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Montreal.

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40 Dead, Now 40 Laid Off: Inside a Nursing Home in Crisis

When the state closed down swimming pools, his job at Clove Lakes became the couple’s only source of income. Staying home was no longer an option.

“When I came back, the supervisors and directors were staying in the home all night, and asking anyone to take extra shifts. Usually I don’t do that, but I volunteered because I knew that was going to happen anyway.” At home, he feared carrying the virus to his girlfriend’s mother and aunt, who lived in the same house, so he would strip his clothes and put them in the washer every time he returned.

At Clove Lakes, the virus shut down all of their ordinary activities, changing the relationships between the workers and the residents. The administration worked to get masks, gowns and other protective equipment, which many homes lacked. “We were wearing hazmat suits,” Mr. McArthur said, adding that it felt like being in a sauna. “I lost a lot of pounds. So I didn’t catch the quarantine weight like everybody else did.”

The emotional stress was unrelenting, he said. Once employees reported to the Covid unit, they could not leave or see other colleagues until the day’s end. Residents, especially those with dementia, often did not understand why their relatives were not visiting, why they could not leave their rooms and be with their neighbors for meals or activities.

“The worst was when you had to tell them they had to go back in their room, because the resident in the next room passed away, and you have to put them in a body bag,” Mr. McArthur said.

“One day you’ll see an ambulette come in and haul someone out and they’ll never come back,” Mr. McArthur said. “It is the worst experience to have.” Each death took a toll on the staff, but there was no time to grieve, he said. “You develop chemistry with someone, and it’s like they’re part of the family or a close friend. And we are all they have sometimes, especially after they stopped having visitors.”

The home did not provide counselors to help the staff deal with stress, but directed them to a hotline set up by the state office of mental health, Ms. Senk, the administrator, said.

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Kansas nursing home faces severe federal penalties after deadly coronavirus outbreak

The first hint that the novel coronavirus was tearing through the nursing home in rural Kansas arrived in a Facebook post this month. The Andbe Home was in the grips of “a full COVID outbreak,” administrator Megan Mapes wrote, “despite the precautions we have been taking since March.”



a house that has a sign on the side of a road: The Andbe Home in Kansas is facing penalties from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services after all 63 residents became infected with the coronavirus and at least 10 died. (Dana M. Paxton/Norton Telegram/AP)


The Andbe Home in Kansas is facing penalties from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services after all 63 residents became infected with the coronavirus and at least 10 died. (Dana M. Paxton/Norton Telegram/AP)

But behind the walls of the facility, nursing home officials had failed to take the most basic measures to prevent the spread of the highly contagious virus after learning two residents were infected, according to a blistering report released Tuesday by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which resulted in severe penalties.

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By the time the viral firestorm had finished sweeping through the nursing home, all 63 residents were infected and at least 10 had died. Medicare moved Monday to terminate the Andbe Home from its program, cutting it off from federal dollars and imposing thousands of dollars in fines.

Government inspectors found that infected residents were separated from their healthy roommates by little more than a privacy sheet. Communal dining continued for two days. Multiple staff members failed to wear masks — even after the outbreak took hold.

In an email Tuesday to The Washington Post, the nursing home administrator disputed some of the findings outlined in the report and stood by the response to the outbreak, saying the facility had immediately quarantined infected residents and that staff wore full personal protective equipment, including goggles, masks and gloves.

“This is a terrible virus, but I am proud of how our staff has battled COVID-19 over the course of the pandemic, coming to work every day under extenuating circumstances, and caring for all of our residents,” Mapes wrote. “I am also proud of and thankful for the mutual support between Andbe Home and our community during trying times for everyone.”

The Medicare report, however, said the facility’s failures had “placed all residents in immediate jeopardy by the spread of Covid-19 to all residents.”

The virus’s rampage through the nursing home came amid a surge of infections in Kansas’s Norton County, which led the nation in per capita case increases between Oct. 12 and Oct. 19 and ranked second this week, according to a Post analysis. Before Oct. 13, the county near the Nebraska border had been spared virus-related deaths.

Now, there are clusters of cases at the nursing home, where 55 of 70 staff members tested positive for the virus, as well as at a correctional facility and a bank. City offices are closed to the public, municipal court is postponed and multiple businesses have temporarily shut their doors. The funeral home has posted a wave of obituaries for people who lived at the Andbe Home: a stained glass artist with pieces displayed around town, a onetime staffer turned resident, a skilled home cook known

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U.S. News Names Best Nursing Homes for 2020-21

Nursing Home profiles to also include new patient safety information, highlighting up-to-date COVID-19 data.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — U.S. News & World Report, the global authority in health care rankings, today released the 2020-21 Best Nursing Homes. As nursing homes and facilities across the nation cope with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. News remains committed to providing data-driven information and guidance to help patients, families and caregivers understand their long-term and short-term care options. This year, to accompany the new ratings, nursing home profile pages were updated to include a patient safety summary that reflects COVID-19 data alongside other measurements of safety and related advice on choosing a home or facility amidst the pandemic.

U.S. News & World Report Logo. (PRNewsfoto/U.S. News & World Report)
U.S. News & World Report Logo. (PRNewsfoto/U.S. News & World Report)

“U.S. News strives to provide access to information that allows consumers to make educated decisions on all types of care,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “Updating the profiles to include a patient safety summary that highlights COVID-19 data paired with other measures of care arms families, caregivers and patients with the information needed to make a decision that keeps safety at the highest priority.”  

The 11th year of the U.S. News Best Nursing Homes combines comprehensive information about care, health inspections and staffing with COVID-19 outbreaks, flu and pneumonia vaccination rates, and infection control violations listed on the patient safety summary. Individuals can easily conduct customized research for a highly rated nursing home by location, size, Medicare and Medicaid coverage and Alzheimer’s care.

In addition to helping families find the best nursing home for their loved one, U.S. News published pieces on nursing home patient safety during COVID-19 and what to expect as nursing homes resume in-person visits. These pieces join new Hospital Hero profiles featuring a nursing home activities director easing pandemic-related isolation and a public policy expert calling for nursing home employees’ wages and benefits to reflect the current dangerous nature of their jobs.

This year, California has the highest number on the list, with 215 nursing homes that received a High Performing Rating in Short-Term Rehabilitation and 135 designated as High Performing in Long-Term Care, followed by Florida, Illinois and New Jersey. Hawaii, Maine and Alaska have the highest proportion of Best Nursing Homes with at least half of all Medicare or Medicaid certified nursing homes in these states receiving a High-Performing designation in either Short-Term Rehabilitation or Long-Term Care, or both. The Best Nursing Homes reflect U.S. News’ analysis of data collected and published by the federal government using a methodology defined by U.S. News that evaluates factors that U.S. News has determined most impact patient and resident care, safety and outcomes.

The Best Nursing Home finder features ratings on both long-term and short-term care. The Long-Term Care Rating aims to provide prospective residents who need help with daily activities, and their families, with analysis and information regarding the quality

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