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Lawsuit claims video shows Bishop’s Falls guards assaulting unconscious inmate in dentist’s chair | Canada | News

An inmate at a central Newfoundland prison is filing multiple lawsuits, including against corrections officers and a Gander oral surgeon, following an incident that reportedly happened at the surgeon’s office.

The Telegram has learned the man — an inmate at Bishops Falls Corrections Centre whose name is not being made public yet — alleges he was medically sedated at the oral surgeon’s office last month, when a corrections officer was video-recorded performing a dental procedure on him.

The video is believed to have been taken by another corrections officer, while two dental assistants were in the room at one point of the procedure.

The two corrections officers, who took the inmate to the oral surgeon’s office for an undisclosed procedure, were recently escorted out of the Bishop’s Falls facility by RCMP officers, a source told The Telegram earlier this week.

On Tuesday, both the RCMP and the Justice Department turned down requests for comment.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief. With all due respect to my client. I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.”

However, when contacted by The Telegram Wednesday, St. John’s lawyer Bob Buckingham confirmed he has been retained to represent the inmate and will file the lawsuit “fairly quickly” on his behalf.

“I haven’t heard of this happening in recent times in Newfoundland,” Buckingham said.

He said the lawsuits will claim battery, assault and breach of trust against the corrections officers; professional negligence and a breach of contract against the oral surgeon and the oral surgeon’s office; breach of trust by the corrections services and the provincial government, as well as vicarious liability against the provincial government, as it is alleged to have happened while corrections officers were on duty.

Buckingham said his client was unconscious at the time of the alleged incident, having been medically sedated, and had no knowledge of what happened when he left the dentist’s office a short time later. He said he learned about it and the video later from corrections administration.

“He understands one of the corrections officers took a video of this, which made the rounds within corrections services,” said Buckingham, adding that both the corrections administration and the RCMP are in possession of the video.

Buckingham said he was appalled to hear what the inmate says happened to him.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief,” he said. “With all due respect to my client, I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances to believe, given a professional involving a dentist and corrections officers who were there for his protection, and the inmate being under medically induced sedation.

“But types of egregious breaches of trust do happen in our province,” added Buckingham, who also represents the family of Jonathan Henoche, an inmate who was killed in segregation at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in November 2019, in lawsuits against the corrections officers, the prison and the provincial government.

He said

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medicine

Precision medicine key to preventing disease developing later in life, Singapore News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – An individual’s genes can determine the amount of risk he has of developing life-threatening conditions such as heart disease and in turn allows for early intervention.

This is central to the precision medicine programme here, said Professor Tan Chorh Chuan, the chief health scientist from the Ministry of Health and executive director at the Healthcare Transformation Office.

Prof Tan told a webinar on Wednesday (Nov 25) that the programme looks at the genome sequences of participants to help determine the cumulative risks of different diseases based on their genes.

This can be particularly useful for some complaints like premature heart disease, added Prof Tan, who was joined on the webinar panel by Prudential chief executive Dennis Tan and Health Promotion Board (HPB) CEO Zee Yoong Kang.

The event, which covered a broad range of health topics from diabetes and vaccines to strategies on how to stay healthy, is part of The Straits Times Reset 2021 webinar series. It was sponsored by Prudential and moderated by ST senior health correspondent Salma Khalik.

Prof Tan told the webinar that a condition known as familial hypercholesterolemia is caused when a person has a gene that results in high cholesterol levels at a much younger age. If that gene is present, the individual will have up to 20 times higher risk of heart disease – and at an earlier age.

“And then if we identify somebody, we can also test the family. So these preventive strategies will be part of precision health,” he added.

The HPB is working to make use of the clinical, behavioural and digital data as well as genetic data – with patient consent – to identify those at higher risk to allow for early intervention.

Prudential’s Mr Tan said Singaporeans need not be worried about being part of the programme or be concerned if they find out their genome sequences. Having “bad” genes will not make it harder for them to secure insurance policies, he assured.

Privacy is really important, Mr Tan said, adding that “we (Prudential) are very, very careful about such things”.

He said individuals ultimately have to take charge of their own health and should find out more. He said: “Preventive healthcare is all about them being in the driver’s seat, and going through the whole process of early detection, health screening and all.

“So I think as insurers, we will definitely support them.”

Ms Khalik noted that if a person learns that he is at a high risk of getting a certain disease, it will give him the time and opportunity to act before the ailment takes hold.

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medicine

Does Health Insurance Cover Concierge Medicine? |U.S. News

Does health insurance cover concierge medicine? Are there strategies for getting the most out of your health insurance with respect to concierge medicine?

(Getty Images)

The answers are: sometimes, and yes.

How Concierge Medicine Works

Concierge medicine is a heath care model in which a patient pays a fee – monthly, biannually or annually – directly to their doctor for the practice’s services. Under this model, consumers have access to their doctor or another physician in the practice whenever they want. Patients can make same-day appointments with little or no waiting.

This framework is similar to an arrangement of a client who keeps an attorney on retainer. Such clients can obtain legal services whenever they need them and don’t pay by the hour or case.

Concierge Medicine Costs

As for costs, the annual fee to subscribe to most concierge medicine practices ranges between $1,200 and $3,000, according to conciergemedicinetoday.org. Some high-end concierge medicine practices that provide services to well-off patients can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year, experts say.

Here is the breakdown of payment options that concierge medicine practices accept, according to conciergemedicinetoday.org:

  • Cash only, 51%
  • Medicare or some insurance, 29%
  • Medicare but no HMO or PPO plans, 14%
  • Insurance but no Medicare, 6%

What Health Insurance Does and Does Not Cover

Here are the ways you can use health insurance for concierge medicine:

Medicare or some insurance. If you have Medicare or other health insurance, you can join a concierge medical practice, but you’ll have to pay the membership fee yourself. Regarding Medicare, a concierge medical practice “can’t include additional charges for items or services that Medicare usually covers unless Medicare won’t pay for the item or service,” according to Medicare.gov. In those situations, your physician must give you a written notice, known as an “Advance Beneficiary Notice of Noncoverage,” listing the services and reasons why Medicare may not pay. In such situations, a concierge practice may seek to impose additional fees for services not covered by Medicare, says Michael Seavers, the program lead in Healthcare Informatics at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He notes that Medicare isn’t only used by older people. Individuals under age 65 with certain medical conditions, like renal failure, may also qualify for Medicare.

Similarly, if you have private health insurance, you must pay the fee yourself to become a patient in a concierge practice, says Dr. Amna Husain, a pediatrician and the founder of Pure Direct Pediatrics. That’s a concierge practice in Marlboro, New Jersey. “This fee will include the normal care you received from a non-concierge doctor with the added personal medical amenities the concierge practice offers,” she says.

You may be able to use Medicare or other health insurance to pay for items and services the concierge practice doesn’t provide, which can include:

  • Prescription medications.
  • Lab work.
  • Imaging.
  • Emergency department visits and hospitalizations.

Doctors who accept assignment can’t charge you extra for Medicare-covered services. (In the context of Medicare, “assignment” means your health

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fitness

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp eager for good news as Naby Keita suffers injury

Jurgen Klopp has more injury worries
Jurgen Klopp has more injury worries

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp will be hoping for some good news on the fitness of midfielders Thiago Alcantara and Jordan Henderson in the next 24 hours after being struck down by yet more injury problems.

The defending Premier League champions underlined their enduring quality and will to win with a comfortable 3-0 victory over Leicester – setting a new club record of 64 unbeaten league matches at home – despite missing 10 members of his first-team squad.

But just as Klopp got Fabinho back from a three-week lay-off with a hamstring problem to play as an emergency centre-back he lost fellow midfielder Naby Keita to a similar injury.

And midfielder Xherdan Shaqiri did not even make the squad after it was discovered he had returned from international duty with yet another muscle problem.

With Wednesday’s Champions League visit of Atalanta offering the chance to secure qualification to the knockout phase with two matches still to play Klopp will hope either or both of Henderson, who came back from England duty with a thigh problem, and Thiago, having been sidelined by a knee problem since mid-October, can be available as he is still without Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, who has not played after a knee injury in pre-season.

Without him his midfield options look fairly slim as, with James Milner filling in at right-back for the injured Trent Alexander-Arnold, 19-year-old academy graduate Leighton Clarkson made his first appearance in a match day squad against the Foxes after they learned of Shaqiri’s unavailability.

“Shaq had a muscle injury with the national team which he didn’t really realise,” said Klopp.

“He trained with us, we gave him a day off and then he came back and was involved in the session, but was not fully involved.

“After that he felt a little bit (of a problem). Then we did a scan and they found he has an injury from five or six days ago.

“Nobody knew about that, not even Shaq knew about it, but that’s how things sometimes are and so he was not able to be involved.

Mohamed Salah is likely to return to the squad after a negative Covid-19 test having tested positive on international duty with Egypt but in his absence summer signing Diogo Jota continued his hot streak.

A seventh goal in his last six club appearances saw him become the first Liverpool player to score in his first four home top-flight appearances.

“Yes, he’s a good player – that’s the reason why we signed him,” was Klopp’s assessment.

Leicester manager Brendan Rodgers has injury problems of his own, although not to the extent of his successor at Liverpool.

He had hoped to have left-back Timothy Castagne back for the trip to Anfield but the Belgium international suffered a minor set-back in his recovery from a thigh injury.

“He had a few good

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medicine

SPORTS MEDICINE: Take heart from latest COVID-19-related news | John Doherty

Dr. Sean Swearingen is a cardiologist with Community Care Network in Munster, who works with the athletic department at Purdue Northwest. He explained what “mild” symptoms of COVID-19 are and what they are not.

“It is symptoms that are not in any way inhibiting their day-to-day function and they are for less than 10 days,” he said, “then that is what falls in the category of mild symptoms and they don’t need any further cardiac workup. From the patients I have (had tested), they haven’t had to be hospitalized but they have had relatively significant symptoms where they have been out of commission for several days, haven’t been able to attend their online classes (because) they’ve been so fatigued. To me, I would consider that moderate symptoms.”

Symptomatic or not, cardiac tested or not, all athletes who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 need to be cautious as they return to sport, according to Swearingen.

While I questioned the Big Ten’s 21-day minimum in comparison to the ACC’s 10-day minimum in this space earlier this month, Swearingen finds it more than reasonable.

“The 21-day Big Ten protocol (allows) for a week-long ramp period in the final week,” he explained. “I am a big supporter of this — a gradual monitored increase in activity allows for another layer of safety so that players can be monitored for signs and symptoms before they are putting themselves at risk in full-on competition. The monitored physical activity is just as important as the testing itself and it seems like a lot of people are ignoring that final part in the guideline, the gradual increase in activity.”

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dentist

Court dismisses dentist’s appeal over tax on earnings, Singapore News & Top Stories

The High Court has dismissed a dentist’s appeal that he should be charged the corporate tax rate for earnings paid to a company he created, finding his main goal in setting it up was to avoid tax.

Justice Choo Han Teck ruled in the first such case to go on appeal to the High Court that Dr Wee Teng Yau’s move would enable him to pay less tax on the same services he provided.

This is because his fees paid into the company would be its income and taxed at the lower corporate tax rate. But if the fees had been paid directly to him, the personal income tax rate – which is higher – would be levied.

Justice Choo’s ruling pivots on a provision in the Income Tax Act, according to judgment grounds released earlier this month.

The provision at issue is Section 33 of the Act.

The tax authorities said last week that Section 33 has been applied to more than 100 medical professionals.

Referring to the section, Justice Choo said it is meant to cover arrangements created by the taxpayer to reduce the taxes which he would otherwise have to pay.

The judge found in this case “the facts show (its) main, if not only, purpose was to enable Dr Wee to avoid tax. This is precisely the type of arrangement that is covered by Section 33(1)”.

The case is the first to be heard before the court as previous such appeals were not pursued beyond the Income Tax Board of Review.

Dr Wee was employed by dental clinic Alfred Cheng Orthodontic Clinic (ACOC) from January 2011 to May 2012.

He set up Straighten (SPL) in May 2012, and was its sole director and shareholder. He continued to provide the same dental services to ACOC’s patients, but ACOC made the payments to SPL instead of to him, the court noted.

SPL, in turn, paid him a salary and director’s fee. Tax-exempt dividends were also declared and paid to him from SPL’s profits.

For assessment year 2012, ACOC paid Dr Wee $279,194.60 in fees.

Between assessment years 2013 and 2016, the fees ACOC paid SPL and reported as SPL’s income totalled $1,470,764.

SPL paid $336,000 in director’s remuneration to Dr Wee who also received tax-exempt dividends totalling $765,205 as a shareholder.

Each year, the remuneration he received from SPL ranged between $40,000 and $110,000. This is significantly lower than the $279,194.60 he got as income in 2011 from ACOC, the court noted.

The Comptroller of Income Tax treated the fees SPL received from ACOC as Dr Wee’s income and imposed the personal income tax rate instead of the corporate tax rate as sought by Dr Wee.

The Income Tax Board of Review affirmed the Comptroller’s position and Dr Wee appealed further.

In the High Court, the Comptroller’s counsel Zheng Sicong and Serene Lau relied on Section 33(1) as the ground for the levy.

But Dr Wee’s lawyer Lau Kah Hee argued, among other things, that Dr Wee would

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dentist

Additional allegations of malpractice against dentist Gaum surface at protest | Local | News

One of the dozen-plus people who attended the Broken Trust protest Saturday morning said Errol Gaum’s pediactric dental clinic sounded more like a “torture chamber.” 

“During my training, I was told if we heard screams in the reception area, we were to turn up the volume on the TV (or radio) so it would block the screaming from the parents,” said Kathy, who didn’t want her surname used.

She worked at the dental office on the Bedford Highway for only 10 days in the mid-2000s but it was long enough for her to surmise the children were not receiving proper care at the clinic.

“A parent asked me if I could check on their child,” Kathy said. “I walked past the reception desk, went down to check on the child. I was instructed when the dentist opened the door to never return to that room again.

“I was in shock. I used to work as a registered dental assistant. That’s not how dentistry should be for children, it’s all about comforting children. That sounded like a torture chamber.”

Horror stories from Gaum’s longtime pediatric dental career surfaced recently on the Victims of Errol Gaum Facebook group and in the mainstream media, prompting the Broken Trust protest in front of his Bedford Highway office.

Scott Wolfe, 39, told The Chronicle Herald earlier that when saw the photo of Gaum, his dentist from 30 years ago, circulating on social media that it sent chills down his spine.

Gaum was Wolfe’s dentist for three years and he said every visit was filled with pain. Wolfe remembers being pinned down by the dentist and his assistant as he sat in the chair. He recalls having allergies as a little boy and being threatened for breathing through his mouth, instead of his stuffed-up nose. 

“They’d become incredibly rude and very disrespectful,” he said. “(They) told me that I’d be in a lot of trouble if I didn’t start breathing through my nose because I was steaming up their dental mirror.”

Wolfe would beg his mom every time not to go to the dentist.

Gaum’s licence was suspended earlier this week by the provincial dental board after an emergency meeting was called Wednesday night to discuss numerous complaints against him.

“I’m very happy that the dental board is actually listening to us and suspending his licence even though it should have been suspended long ago,” Ryan Binder told the Cape Breton Post.

Binder, a Cape Bretoner who believes Gaum hurt his six-year-old daughter, said the suspension is only the start and the group won’t stop until the dentist’s licence is revoked and his actions are criminally investigated.

A Halifax Regional Police spokesman confirmed that they are investigating “numerous reports that a man who was working as a dentist assaulted patients at numerous locations over a period of time from the 1970s to this year.”

Kathy said HRP has asked to speak with her.

Binder filed his complaint with the dental board last week after his daughter’s

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fitness

Stipe’s late fitness test a Sailors’ ploy?, Football News & Top Stories

Lion City Sailors striker Stipe Plazibat will face a late fitness test to decide if he will be ready for today’s high-stakes showdown against Singapore Premier League (SPL) leaders Albirex Niigata.

The 31-year-old Croat is the competition’s leading scorer with 14 goals, but hobbled off with a hamstring strain in the 3-1 win over Hougang United on Tuesday.

Sailors coach Aurelio Vidmar refuted the notion that he is keeping their opponents guessing. The Australian, 53, said: “We will make the decision on Sunday morning. My interest is the player’s health. If he is going to do more damage, then we won’t take the risk.

“If this was a cup final or the final game of the season, then it’s a completely different story. There’s no question we would try to play him because if he breaks down we are going into a break.

“But this situation is a bit different, a bit more delicate.”

What is undoubtedly clear are the stakes at hand. There are just five games left and this clash between first and third in the table will have a huge bearing on the championship.

The Sailors are three points behind Albirex, champions from 2016 to 2018, but will leapfrog them with a win. A loss however, will create a six-point deficit that may be too much to overcome.

The other title contenders, Tampines Rovers, also have 20 points like Albirex and travel to face Tanjong Pagar United in today’s other match.

Vidmar, the former Australia captain and coach, remains confident of his side’s ability to hit the back of the net regardless of Plazibat’s availability.

The Sailors have notched 29 goals, with 10 different scorers. Both are league-leading numbers.

They will also welcome back dynamic midfielder Song Ui-young from a head injury, while playmaker Shahdan Sulaiman, who was sorely missed in the 3-2 defeat when both sides met last month, has also returned. He will be a threat from set pieces.

Vidmar said: “Goals are a big part of Stipe’s game, and his link-up play has been very good. But the beauty of our team is everyone is itching to play and the guys who have come in have stepped up and done an amazing job.

“That’s the commitment and competition I want in the team.

“So, we are in good shape. Shahril (Ishak) is back in the team, we have Gabriel Quak, we can put Adam Swandi there, we can put Hafiz Nor up front.

“We have options, players with different characteristics and playing styles, which is a plus.”

His team are excellent front runners too. While 26 of the 36 SPL games this term have been won by the side that scores first, the Sailors are masters of this. They have picked up the full three points in all the five matches they have opened the scoring.

But standing in their way is an obdurate Albirex defence that has kept three consecutive clean sheets and a winning mentality.

Seven of their 22 goals have come

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fitness

620,000 students accept Dubai Fitness Challenge – News

Children aged between 2 and 16 years can access over 80 free games and educational activities

More than 620,000 students from 600 schools in the UAE have taken on the Dubai Fitness Challenge (DFC), organisers announced on Saturday. The DFC, which began on October 30, requires participants to commit to 30 minutes of physical activity for 30 days.

Children aged between 2 and 16 years can access over 80 free games and educational activities to take part in the challenge at home or in their classrooms. Free online resources for parents and teachers are available on www.dubaifitnesschallenge.com/education.

Children can “join their beloved superheroes and cartoon characters in online workouts, wellness and dance sessions for free, easy-to-follow exercises and routines”, according to organisers.

Dr Abdulla Al Karam, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Director-General of the Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA), said: “More than any other time, this year has shown us how important it is to be fit and healthy; to have fun, and to spend time with friends and family. The DFC brings all these values together. It’s been great to see so many schools and families get together online to build on existing fitness habits, and to start new ones.”

Ahmed Al Khaja, CEO of Dubai Festivals and Retail Establishment (DFRE), said sports, exercise and wellness activities are “crucial” for children. “The DFC is an opportunity for parents, teachers and educators across the city to inspire the youth to achieve the maximum possible benefit from their stay at home and make fitness an even more enjoyable part of their everyday lives.

“Schools are often the first forums that guide children’s interaction with fitness. This understanding drives our motivation to ensure DFC’s robust school and family fitness programme creates a safe environment for children of all ages and abilities. It encourages a lifelong focus on health and wellbeing with meaningful and enjoyable experiences, while adding fun and excitement to their distance learning,” said Al Khaja.

What’s on offer?

Online virtual workouts, wellness and dance sessions are available on www.dubaifitnesschallenge.com/education

>> Workout videos from PJ Masks that are released each week throughout DFC

>> Fun workouts with characters from IMG Worlds Of Adventure

>> Les Mills Born To Move music workouts

>> FIFA and EA workouts, with drills and tricks by Kotaro Tokuda – the youngest freestyle football champion

>> Special song routines with Papa Smurfs, Brainy Smurf, Smurfette and Vanity Smurf at MotiongateT Dubai.

[email protected]

Staff Reporter


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dentist

‘It put chills down my spine’: Previous patient of suspended Bedford dentist haunted by painful memories | Local | News

When Scott Wolfe saw the photo of his dentist from 30 years ago circulating on social media, he was overwhelmed by a flood of emotions.

“It put chills down my spine,” he said.

The photo is of Errol Gaum, a long-time practising pediatric dentist in HRM, whose clinic is now in Bedford. It was shared on a Facebook group alongside numerous accounts from patients and parents who came forward to accuse Gaum of using excessive force and doing procedures without consent.

Wolfe, who is 39 years old now, hadn’t been to Gaum’s practice once or twice. Gaum was his dentist for three years and every visit was filled with pain. Wolfe remembers being pinned down by the dentist and his assistant as he sat in the chair. He recalls having allergies as a little boy and being threatened for breathing through his mouth, instead of his stuffed-up nose. 

“They’d become incredibly rude and very disrespectful,” he said. “(They) told me that I’d be in a lot of trouble if I if I didn’t start breathing through my nose because I was steaming up their dental mirror.”

Wolfe would beg his mom every time not to go to the dentist.

Wolfe’s mom, Florence Wolfe, was never allowed in the room with him. Sitting in the waiting room, she would hear him crying.

“You just want to automatically run to them,” she said.

One memory Florence has is of Gaum giving her son a denture. When she asked what the denture was for, she was told it was to “correct her son’s speech.”

Two weeks later, Scott lost his denture, and his mother called the dentist to have it replaced but was told it wasn’t necessary. Florence still wonders why it was suddenly OK for her son to go without the denture when it was essential only a couple of weeks ago.

Despite all the strange occurrences and her son’s reluctance to go to the dentist, Florence didn’t think there was something wrong at the time.

“(I) chalked it up to just being a nervous child at the dentist. Because I never dreamt of what was going on in there. I had no idea what was going on in there.”

Wolfe, who has a two-year old daughter, said he thinks the reason Gaum’s alleged misconduct wasn’t exposed till now is the idea that children don’t like to go to the dentist. But he said parents shouldn’t blame themselves or feel guilty for sending their children to Gaum because they couldn’t have known.

“Those feelings are for sure natural … and I wouldn’t expect you not to feel that way,” he said.

“But you’re trusting a professional, just like you would trust a doctor. … And you’re trusting your child in their hands to get … good medical help. And you think even though it’s a bad experience, or they’re having a tough time with it, it’s for the greater good.”

It’s not the parents’ fault that Gaum failed their trust, he said.

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