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fitness

Over 620,000 students from 600 schools commit to 30 minutes of activity for 30 days for Dubai Fitness Challenge

(MENAFN – Emirates News Agency (WAM)) DUBAI, 21st November, 2020 (WAM) — Recognising the integral role that schools play in instilling fitness-focused habits in the country’s youth, Dubai Fitness Challenge, DFC, 2020 is ensuring that more than 620,000 students across 600 schools adopt healthier and happier lifestyles for 30 minutes for 30 days.

The fitness programme of free events, sports activities and family-friendly virtual sessions will continue throughout the month, while a new robust library of free online resources for parents and teachers will further, enable them to motivate children to get fit while having fun. Exciting activity calendars can be downloaded for free on the DFC website, catering to various learning models with over 80 fitness and wellbeing-focused activity templates and games for children aged two to 16 years. For an extra boost at home, kids can also join their beloved superheroes and cartoon characters in online workouts, wellness and dance sessions for free, easy-to-follow exercises and routines.

Dr. Abdulla Al Karam, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Director-General of the Knowledge and Human Development Authority, KHDA, commented, “More than any other time, this year has shown us how important it is to be fit and healthy; to have fun and to spend time with friends and family. The Dubai Fitness Challenge brings all these values together. It’s been great to see so many schools and families get together online to build on existing fitness habits and to start new ones. We are grateful to the team at Dubai Tourism for bringing us all together and for giving us a challenge we can all rise to.”

Ahmed Al Khaja, CEO of Dubai Festivals and Retail Establishment, DFRE, commented, “For children and young people, the importance of physical activity can never be understated. Now, more than ever, sports, exercise and wellness activities are crucial to inspiring sustained shifts towards more active routines for children.”

Little ones can choose from an incredible range of free workouts that the whole family will love – be it exclusive workout videos from PJ Masks that are released each week throughout DFC; fun workouts with all the favourite characters from IMG Worlds Of Adventure; Les Mills Born To Move music workouts; FIFA and EA workouts, with drills and tricks by Kotaro Tokuda – the youngest freestyle football champion; or special song routines with Papa Smurfs, Brainy Smurf, Smurfette and Vanity Smurf at Motiongate Dubai.

To make 30 minutes of daily exercise fun for the whole family, DFC’s flagship Fitness Villages also promise something for everyone. You can head down to the Mai Dubai Fitness Village Festival City Mall and experience bag jumps, quick flights and the region’s largest mobile pump track at The Arch. Go to the DP World Fitness Village Kite Beach and try out trampoline workouts at Fitbit Rebounder; boot camps, dance classes and functional training at the Teen Fit area; or monkey bars and climbing challenges at the Kids Camp. Enjoy a day out at the park with the Emirates NBD

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health

This pregnant woman ran a mile in less than 6 minutes 1 week before her due date

A 28-year-old pregnant woman who ran a mile in less than six minutes is showing that pregnancy has no limits.

Makenna Myler, who runs with the Valor Track Club in Orange County, California, ran one mile last week in five minutes and 25 seconds, and she did it while nine months pregnant.

Her husband, Mike, captured the feat on video and shared it on TikTok, where it has gone viral with tens of thousands of likes, comments and shares.

“I think pregnancy is a beautiful thing and it’s not an injury or a sickness, that you’re still really capable,” Myler, who ran track at Brigham Young University, told “Good Morning America.” “I think a lot of women are showing that, that women are capable and that’s what matters.”

Myler said she and her husband, whom she describes as her biggest supporter, jokingly bet each other $100 that she would not finish the mile in under eight minutes, a bet Myler clearly won.

MORE: I breast pumped while running an Ironman race and was floored by the responses online

Myler, whose due date was Oct. 19, said that while her sub-six minute mile is getting attention, she doesn’t want other women to think her training during pregnancy has been a breeze.

“The first trimester I didn’t have that extra weight but I was exhausted and I was probably running slower than I am now,” she said. “I’ve had to listen to my body and really let myself recover and get a workout in if I can, if my body is feeling it, but they’re definitely few and far between.”

Myler added of her approach to workouts, “When people say, ‘What are you going to run this time?’ I say, ‘Whatever my body wants.’ If I don’t want to do it, I’m not going to do it, because pregnancy and my health obviously comes first.”

PHOTO: Makenna Myler, 28, of Heber, Utah, is photographed running during her pregnancy. (Jorge Jabaz/Valor Track Club)
PHOTO: Makenna Myler, 28, of Heber, Utah, is photographed running during her pregnancy. (Jorge Jabaz/Valor Track Club)

And while most women will not run nearly five-minute miles, the workout done by Myler, who has dreams of representing the United States in the Olympics, is a safe one, experts say.

MORE: Supermom stops running during a 106-mile race to breastfeed her son

“For my patients, in general, I tell them that they can continue doing anything that they were doing before pregnancy as long as it remains comfortable and doesn’t cause any pain,” said Dr. Danielle Jones, a board-certified OBGYN in College Station, Texas, who is not involved in Myler’s treatment. “You don’t see it a lot because most people get uncomfortable by the third trimester and aren’t wanting to run a five-minute mile, but there’s definitely people out there who can comfortably continue that in their pregnancy.”

Jones stressed that there are conditions that prevent women from exercising during pregnancy and that women should always consult with their doctors throughout their pregnancies and keep them informed of their exercise routine.

For pregnant women who are

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health

To avoid quarantining students, a school district tries moving them around every 15 minutes.

To reduce the number of students sent home to quarantine after exposure to the coronavirus, the Billings Public Schools, the largest school district in Montana, came up with an idea that has public health experts shaking their heads: Reshuffling students in the classroom four times an hour.

The strategy is based on the definition of a “close contact” requiring quarantine — being within 6 feet of an infected person for 15 minutes or more. If the students are moved around within that time, the thinking goes, no one will have had “close contact” and be required to stay home if a classmate tests positive.

Greg Upham, the superintendent of the 16,500-student school district, said in an interview that contact tracing had become a huge burden for the district, and administrators were looking for a way to ease the burden when they came up with the movement idea. It was not intended to “game the system,” he said, but rather to encourage the staff to be cognizant of the 15-minute window.

In an email to administrators last week, Mr. Upham encouraged staff to “whenever possible, disrupt the 15-minute timeline through movement, distancing, and masking.”

Infectious disease experts say that moving students around every few minutes is actually more likely to increase transmission of the virus, by exposing more people to an infected student. It will also complicate contact tracing efforts, they said.

“That is not an evidence-based practice or sound scientific policy,” said Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, an epidemiologist at the John Hopkins Center for Health Security who has been supportive of reopening schools for in-person instruction.

The 15-minute, 6-foot definition is a guideline for identifying who might be at greater risk of infection, not a hard-and-fast rule about when it can or cannot happen, Dr. Nuzzo said, adding that a person can certainly become infected in less time or from farther away, especially indoors.

Dr. Sarah Fortune, chair of the department of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard’s school of public health, said the 15-minute definition was meant to help contact tracers “effectively and efficiently identify people with the highest risk and target intervention to them.”

Kelly Hornby, principal of Billings West High School, wrote in an email to his staff last week that moving students around every few minutes and then returning them to their original desks would help dissipate airborne droplets containing coronavirus, to the point “where the risk of being contaminated is greatly reduced.”

Dr. Fortune disagreed with that idea. “The particles that transmit Covid, they hang out in the air, and they spread through the air, and the aerosols can hang out for a very long time,” she said. “So stirring that air up or moving around from your spot doesn’t really limit your exposure or risk.”

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health

Man In Coma For 8 Years Wakes Up Minutes After Doctors Give Him Sleeping Pill

A man, who was in a coma for nearly a decade, regained full consciousness and started to walk, minutes after a doctor gave him a sleeping pill.

The man, identified as 37-year-old Richard, was hospitalized in his late 20s after he choked on a piece of meat which left him with severe brain damage. He suffered from akinetic mutism, a condition in which a person cannot move or speak.

After eight years, the doctors discovered that certain types of brain damage could be temporarily cured by sleeping pills. With his family’s permission, the pill, Zolpidem, was administered and within 20 minutes of taking it, the man woke up and also asked the nurse how he can operate the wheelchair.

“Because Richard’s situation seemed hopeless, the family and I decided to administer this medication to Richard. Against all expectations, Zolpidem had remarkable effects. After taking the sleeping pill, Richard started talking, wanted to call his father, and started recognizing his brothers again. With some help, he could even get up from his wheelchair and walk short distances,” Doctoral student Willemijn van Erp at Radboud University told medical journal Cortex. 

Speaking about the decision to give him the sleeping pill, Dr. Hisse Arnts at Amsterdam UMC said, “Richard’s brain scans show overactivity in certain parts of the brain. This overactivity causes noise and somehow shuts down the “good” brain activity. We have discovered that administering this sleeping medication can suppress this unwanted brain overactivity, creating space for speech and movement.”

The medication’s effect, however, started wearing off after it was administered once a day for five days.

“The time windows during which the patient was able to talk and move got narrower, and his abilities to move and speak during these time windows decreased. The use of multiple doses of zolpidem during a single day showed no improvement in his clinical condition and sometimes even caused sedation,” Dr. Arnts told the journal. 

CT scan This a representational image showing doctors looking at CT scan in Bethesda, Maryland, Feb. 8, 2018. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

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