Michigan

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Dioxane levels rise; Michigan Medicine further restricts visitors; Small Business Saturday in A2

Happy Friday!

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, even though it likely looked different this year. Today is Black Friday, and although it’s known for great deals to be had at big-box stores, a lesser-known day is Small Business Saturday. Now more than ever, local businesses need support — especially as the pandemic and cold weather restrict operations.

Need some ideas? Main Street Ann Arbor just released its annual shopping guide. Here’s another guide that highlights businesses that are women- and minority-owned. Meanwhile, this gift guide focuses on local food and drink producers. Sarah has also spent the past several months speaking with local business owners and highlighting them for her Small Business Saturday series. Don’t see your favorite business on the list? Submit it here.

Have a great long weekend.

– Meredith (@meredith_A4)

What’s been happening:

⛔️ Michigan Medicine announced this week that no visitors are allowed for adult patients as COVID-19 cases spike across the state. There are some exceptions to the new policy, which took effect on Wednesday. (A4)

🚰 Recent tests from water samples taken in October in the West Park area reveal a spike in Dioxane levels, concerning local officials. (MLive)

🚶‍♀️ The city of Ann Arbor celebrated the grand opening of the Allen Creek Railroad Berm Project this week virtually. (A4)

🚲 Have a look at the new downtown protected bikeway on First Street. (MLive)

🛤 The long-awaited passenger train service from Ann Arbor to Traverse City — known as A2TC — has put test rides slated for 2021 on hold due to the pandemic. (Detroit Free Press)

🎓 A senior at the University of Michigan became the school’s 29th Rhodes Scholar since the awards were established in 1902. (A4)

💻 Toyota and Cisco have partnered to install free Wi-Fi at public sites in the region, including in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. (A4)

Good to know:

🌯 Vegan Kerrytown joint Detroit Street Filling Station expanded into the space next door. The owner said it could become a private dining space or intimate music venue. (A4)

🍪 Have kids ages 8 and up? Love holiday cookies? This local cooking school for kids will be hosting holiday cookie classes online for the whole family. (A4)

🎅 Santa’s Mailbox will return to Main St. this year. From Nov. 28-Dec. 14, write a letter to Santa with a return address and you will receive a response. (A4)

🤝 Tuesday is Giving Tuesday. The annual Rockin’ for the Hungry fund drive by Food Gatherers, ann arbor’s 107one and Kroger will kick off virtually on Tuesday, as will Ann Arbor Summer Festival’s campaign which will feature free performances by Michigan-based artists throughout the day. (A4)

Feature interview of the week:

“We had to pivot to something that is ironic for us, because the whole gist of Literati is that it is a community bookstore that

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medicine

Michigan Medicine restricts visitors for adult patients as COVID-19 cases climb

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has updated its visitor policy with tightened restrictions in order to keep patients and staff safe as COVID-19 cases surge around the state.

As of Wednesday, no visitors will be permitted with adult patients in the health system’s hospitals, unless medically necessary.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

According to Michigan Medicine, the new policy change includes restrictions already announced:

  • No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.
  • At C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, two visitors are allowed for pediatric patients. But family and other visitors are required to wear a mask (covering their mouth and nose) at all Michigan Medicine properties. This includes in a patient room and throughout the facility. Patients who can tolerate a mask must wear one when a health care worker is present in their room.
  • In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance. One primary caregiver is allowed to accompany each pediatric patient to an appointment, unless an additional aide or assistant is required.

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“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology said in a statement. “Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Limiting the risk of transmission of infection has always been a critical priority at Michigan Medicine,” Washer said in a statement. “And I want to reassure the public that if you need health care for a new problem or for continuing care of a chronic problem, you should not put it off.

“We have teams dedicated to keeping our patients and staff safe in our buildings. It is important to not delay emergency or chronic care.”

Washer urged people to avoid Thanksgiving gatherings this year with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving,” she said in a statement. “If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread.

“We need everyone’s help with this. A large surge of

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medicine

Michigan Medicine tightens restrictions for visitors

Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has tightened visitor restrictions for adult patients to minimize the spread of COVID-19 as cases continue to rise.

Beginning Wednesday, there will be no visitors allowed with adult patients at Michigan Medicine hospitals, except for some exceptions. Those exceptions are for end-of-life care, labor ad delivery, and other detailed here.

The new policy go with the other restrictions that have already been announced, which include no visitors with adult emergency department patients, two visitors for pediatric patients, and no visitors for adult patients at clinics.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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Michigan Medicine tightens visitor restrictions as hospitalizations continue to rise

ANN ARBOR, MI – No visitors will be allowed with adult patients in Michigan Medicine hospitals, except when medically necessary, as the health system tries to minimize COVID-19 spread.

Michigan Medicine announced the changes that will go into effect on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Information on exceptions, including end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations, can be found here.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, in a news release.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

The latest visitor limitations come in addition to restrictions the health system previously announced, including not allowing visitors with adult emergency department patients; a two-visitor limit for pediatric patients and mask requirement at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital; and no visitor rule for adult patients at Michigan Medicine clinics, unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

As of Nov. 23, Michigan Medicine reported 103 patients currently admitted that tested positive for COVID-19 – the highest number since late April.

Washer encouraged people to stay home this Thanksgiving and avoid gatherings with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving. If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread,” Washer said.

READ MORE:

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

Michigan coronavirus outbreaks increase 45% in 2 weeks

Exhausted in a ‘nightmare’: A look inside a Michigan hospital COVID unit

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medicine

Michigan Medicine joins country’s top hospitals in #MaskUp campaign as COVID-19 surges nationwide

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has partnered with about 100 of the country’s top health care systems urging Americans to mask up as COVID-19 cases reach record-breaking highs.

The news comes as Michigan reached its highest-ever single-day record Friday with 9,779 new cases.

Just this past week alone, one million Americans have tested positive for the novel virus, with 11.5 million testing positive since cases emerged earlier this year. More than 250,000 Americans to date have died from the disease.

As cases surge and more people choose to gather indoors as temperatures drop, hospital leaders are worried that their facilities could reach capacity quickly and experience shortages of healthy caregivers. Over the past two weeks, more than 900 medical workers at Mayo Clinic tested positive for COVID-19. The hospital system said the infections were due mostly to community spread.

Medical experts maintain that wearing a face mask is the best way to protect yourself from contracting the virus. Masks prevent the inhalation of harmful pathogens by the wearer and prevents potential harmful particles to be exhaled by the wearer and expose others.

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Ads for the new #MaskUp campaign are currently running in some of the nation’s top publications. The message reads:

“As the top nationally-ranked hospitals, we know it’s tough that we all need to do our part and keep wearing masks. But, here’s what we also know: The science has not changed. Masks slow the spread of COVID-19. So, please join us as we all embrace this simple ask: Wear. Care. Share with #MaskUp. Together, wearing is caring. And together, we are saving lives.”

The messages will also appear on social media and other digital platforms in order to reach a broader audience.

“After many months of living in social isolation and refraining from some of our favorite activities, this is not easy. We are all fatigued and stressed. However now is exactly the wrong time to let up,” Marschall S. Runge, CEO of Michigan Medicine and dean of the U-M Medical School said in a statement.

“We all must be vigilant in the behaviors that will protect us, our families, and our neighbors: wear a mask, socially distance, and practice frequent hand hygiene. These practices are our best defense against a disease that we still are trying to understand.”

At one point this week, Michigan Medicine had 75 COVID-19 positive patients at the same time, with roughly 20 of them requiring intensive care.

“Scientists and clinicians are learning more and more from this disease, and the outlook for more effective treatment and vaccination looks promising,” Laraine Washer, medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology at Michigan Medicine said in statement. “But for now, we have to use the tools that we know work: wearing masks, staying socially distant and washing hands.

“This, of course, makes the upcoming holidays a challenge. But the traditional gatherings of multiple households is a high risk situation for exposures to

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medicine

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

ANN ARBOR, MI — Michigan Medicine leaders are calling on the public to not let its guard down as hospitals across the state experience rapid surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

It’s imperative Michigan caregivers stay healthy so they can take care of an expected surge in cases this winter, Marschall Runge, Michigan Medicine CEO and dean of the University of Michigan’s medical school, said in a Thursday, Nov. 18 news conference that also announced a joint nationwide campaign to encourage mask wearing.

Michigan Medicine has joined around 100 of the nation’s top health care systems in the #MaskUp campaign, which urges all Americans to mask up, in an effort to slow the surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, Runge said.

A large surge in cases requiring hospitalizations for COVID-19 due to the lack of adherence to mitigation strategies has the potential to overwhelm health systems, said Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“I’m very glad that we at Michigan Medicine are joining with healthcare systems nationwide to encourage the simple behaviors that are proven to work: Mask up, socially distance, wash your hands,” Washer said.

Like many other hospitals across the state, Michigan Medicine is facing short staffing, Runge said, adding the healthcare system is developing a plan to make sure it can provide necessary care.

“Given the widespread community transmission, hospitals are also managing staffing limitations due to employee illness, absences and responsibilities for childcare,” Washer said.

During the past three weeks, Michigan Medicine has seen an increase in COVID-19 patients, Runge said. This week alone, Michigan Medicine had as many as 75 COVID-19 positive patients at one time, with up to 20 of them being critically ill and requiring ICU care, officials said.

“Following the spring and early summer COVID surge — the first wave, so to speak — we resumed care of many non-COVID patients that need hospitalization, and our hospitals are about 90% full as a result,” Runge said. “With that high occupancy, which we did manage pre-COVID, that puts additional strain on our response to the pandemic.”

The health system’s testing capacity is approximately 10,000 COVID-19 tests per week, while its laboratories continue to develop new strategies to implement different types of COVID tests, officials said.

Michigan Medicine’s testing results recently showed about 14% of those tested are testing positive for COVID, well above the 5% mark reported for most of the summer months, Runge said.

“At Michigan Medicine, and all of Michigan’s healthcare providers, we need your help,” Runge said. “To combat a pandemic we need supplies, we need space and most importantly staff.”

The increased hospital capacity is putting a burden on the number of beds, as well as staff and healthcare providers, Runge said. A large surge of cases also carries a risk of challenging the amount of personal protective equipment required to keep healthcare workers safe, health officials said.

The number of confirmed cases in Michigan reached more than 277,800 this week, including 8,190 deaths.

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medicine

Michigan Medicine, JDRF commit to raise $14M for new diabetes center

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine has partnered with type 1 diabetes research nonprofit JDRF to establish the new JDRF Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan.

The goal of the center, through U-M’s Elizabeth Weiser Caswell Diabetes Institute, is to accelerate research to cure type 1 diabetes and to improve lives. This includes safer day-to-day management of diabetes and improving health for those living with T1D by understanding metabolism in teenagers, young adults and those living long term with the condition.

The Center of Excellence was made possible by a grant from JDRF of $7.37 million. Both partners aim to raise nearly $14 million, with JDRF’s goal of more than $7 million and Michigan’s Medicine goal of $6.5 million for the new COE.

In addition to researching the human metabolism and driving a cure, the COE will advance the Elizabeth Weiser Caswell Diabetes Institute’s broad expertise in understanding beta cells that create insulin, and will aim to address life-threatening complications from T1D, including psychological effects.

Ann Arbor resident Elizabeth Weiser Caswell and her father, Regent Ron Weiser, have made leadership gifts to kickstart the project.

Read: University of Michigan regent, wife donate $30M for new diabetes institute

Caswell’s husband, Trey, and two of her three sons have T1D. Her personal experience drove her to become a T1D advocate. Currently an executive committee member of the board of directors of JDRF’s Metro Detroit/Southeast Michigan Chapter, Caswell said she is excited for the new collaboration and hopes it will deliver breakthroughs for T1D.

“Michigan Medicine is the ideal partner for JDRF,” Caswell said in a news release. “The Pediatric Endocrinology team at Michigan has been there for our family very step of the way — advising us on daily care, advances in treatment technologies, and opportunities for clinical research. U-M is asking questions that aren’t being asked. I think the science is so exciting and there are so many areas where we’re poised for a breakthrough.”

“This center offers us game-changing possibilities,” Sanjoy Dutta, Ph.D., vice president of reseSanarch at JDRF, said in a news release. “Through it, we will be able to accelerate the depth of work already underway, connect to other critical projects and readily collaborate in ways not previously possible. This center is a partnership of strengths that we know will advance research in meaningful ways, and, we all hope, will deliver cures for T1D.”

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An autoimmune disease, T1D causes a person’s pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that allows people to get energy from food. In people with T1D, their body’s immune system attacks and destroys beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin.

Scientists are still trying to understand what causes the condition but believe that both environmental triggers and genetic factors are involved. Unlike T2D, the onset of T2D has nothing to do with lifestyle or diet.

There is no cure for the disease and it is not preventable.

“The JDRF

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medicine

Michigan Medicine announces restrictions to visitors as statewide COVID-19 cases surge

ANN ARBOR – Michigan Medicine announced Monday it has added visitor restrictions at its hospitals and clinics to curb the spread of COVID-19 and to protect patients and staff.

Visitors are no longer allowed in the adult emergency department, except when medically necessary.

Its visitor policy at its adult hospitals and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital remains unchanged: one visitor per day per adult and two for pediatric patients. Visitors, including family, are required to wear a face covering that covers their nose and mouth at all Michigan Medicine properties, including inside a patient’s room. Patients who are able to tolerate a mask must wear one in the presence of a health care worker.

No visitors will be allowed in clinics for adult patients unless the patient has a physical or cognitive impairment that requires assistance. For pediatric patients, one primary caregiver is allowed at an appointment, unless an additional assistant or aide is required.

Exceptions to the new restrictions include end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other scenarios which are listed here.

 Like what you’re reading? Sign up for our email newsletter here!

“We recognize the critical role that visitors – families and friends – play in the well-being of our patients. However, as the spread of COVID-19 hits record-setting levels across the state, we need to minimize the risk of transmission,” Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, said in a statement.

“Our top priority is the safety of our patients and our staff. We hope that by adding these restrictions, we will better protect everyone from COVID-19,” Washer continued. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Since the pandemic began in March, Michigan Medicine has been taking steps to keep staff and patients safe, including screening patients for symptoms, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, moving furniture to observe social distancing and following the latest guidelines to minimize infections.

“Many people in our facilities are very sick or have weakened immune systems, which places them at higher risk,” Washer said in a statement. “Limiting visitors and requiring a mask at all times will help reduce the spread of infection.”

Related reading:

Copyright 2020 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

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medicine

Michigan Medicine implements visitor restrictions amid rising COVID-19 cases

(WXYZ) — Michigan Medicine announced Tuesday it has implemented visitor restrictions at its hospitals and clinics as COVID-19 cases continue to rise.

Related: Michigan health leaders: ‘Not only are the numbers alarming, people are dying’

The hospital group is the latest in southeast Michigan to implement restrictions, following Beaumont, Detroit Medical Center and Henry Ford Health System.

It’s the second time this year that visitor restrictions have been implemented. Those restrictions started being eased about 3 months after the pandemic began.

No visitors are allowed at Michigan Medicine with emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.

The number of visitors at adult hospitals and C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital has not changed. One visitor per day is allowed for every adult and two for pediatric patients.

Family and other visitors have to wear a mask at all properties.

No visitors are allowed with adult emergency department patients, except when medically necessary.

In clinics, no visitors will be allowed for adult patients unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

There are some exceptions for end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations. You can view those here.

“We recognize the critical role that visitors – families and friends – play in the well-being of our patients. However, as the spread of COVID-19 hits record-setting levels across the state, we need to minimize the risk of transmission,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“Our top priority is the safety of our patients and our staff. We hope that by adding these restrictions, we will better protect everyone from COVID-19,” Washer said. “We need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

Additional Coronavirus information and resources:

Click here for a page with resources including a COVID-19 overview from the CDC, details on cases in Michigan, a timeline of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s orders since the outbreak, coronavirus’ impact on Southeast Michigan, and links to more information from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC and the WHO.

View a global coronavirus tracker with data from Johns Hopkins University.

See complete coverage on our Coronavirus Continuing Coverage page.

Visit our The Rebound Detroit, a place where we are working to help people impacted financially from the coronavirus. We have all the information on everything available to help you through this crisis and how to access it.

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Michigan Medicine student volunteers help patients cast emergency absentee ballots

(WXYZ) — With the help of medical students, two patients hospitalized in Ann Arbor were still able to cast their vote on Election Day.

According to an article with Michigan Medicine, student volunteers made themselves available around the clock to assist with emergency absentee voting.

Michigan Medicine says the Emergency Voter Initiative has helped several dozen Michigan Medicine patients request and receive emergency absentee ballots, or use the regular absentee voting process, to ensure their voices are heard in the election.

At 8 a.m. on Election Day, students Shelby Hinds and Eric Rosen helped two longtime voters who had planned to vote in person but were unexpectedly hospitalized on the eve of Election Day.

Michigan Medicine says the students drove first to Pinconning, then to Bay City, to deliver the patients’ signed requests for emergency absentee ballots to their local clerks. Then, ballots in hand, they drove back to University Hospital so the patients could make their choices.

The final leg of the journey will be handled by the patients’ husbands, who will both return home this evening to drop off their wives’ ballots and then go cast their own votes.

Michigan Medicine says patients who are unexpectedly hospitalized and/or have experienced a significant personal emergency in the days leading up to the November 3 voting deadline qualify to request an emergency absentee ballot under state law.

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