Men

health

Active surveillance may be safe for Black men with prostate cancer, study finds

Nov. 3 (UPI) — African-American men on active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer are more likely than their White counterparts to experience disease progression and ultimately require treatment, a study published Tuesday by JAMA found.

However, men of both races included in the study were at the same risk for metastatic cancer — cancer that has spread to other organs — and death from the disease.

The findings, researchers said, suggest that active surveillance is just as safe for African-American men as it is for White men.

In active surveillance, a person’s cancer is monitored closely, with prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, blood tests taken every six months as well as annual digital rectal exam and prostate biopsies, according to the American Cancer Society.

Based on the results of these more frequent assessments, more aggressive treatment may be recommended, the society said.

“Our research provides evidence that active surveillance is safe for African-American men,” study co-author Dr. Brent Rose said in a press release.

“This means more African-American men can avoid definitive treatment and the associated side effects of urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and bowel problems,” said Rose, assistant professor of radiation medicine and applied sciences at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

Prostate cancer is the second-most common cancer among men, after skin cancer, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in nine men will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis in their lifetime, but African-American men are nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with the disease and more than twice as likely to die from it than men in other ethnic groups, the agency estimates.

The cancer is typically slow growing, and low-risk disease may not need to be treated immediately after diagnosis, if ever, and can instead be monitored under an active surveillance approach, Rose and his colleagues said.

However, because of the increased risk for prostate cancer and death from the disease among African-American men, active surveillance is used less frequently in this population, according to their researchers.

For this study, Rose and colleagues reviewed data on 8,726 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2015.

About one in four of these study participants were African-American, the researchers said.

Just under 60% of African-American men included in the analysis experienced disease progression, compared to 48% of White men, the data showed.

In addition, 55% of African-American men in the study required treatment compared to just over 41% percent of White men.

Despite these differences, African-American and White men were diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer at about the same rate — 1% versus 1.4% — and faced the same risk for death — about 1% — as one another.

“Physicians and patients should discuss active surveillance for African-American men with low-risk prostate cancer,” Rose said.

“However, due to the increased risk of progression, African-American men need to be carefully followed and promptly treated if their cancer progresses,” he said.

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fitness

The 13 Most Influential Men In Health & Fitness

Co-founder of Movember, the man who made fundraising fun

Like many of the best ideas, the concept for Movember was dreamed up in a pub. Inspired by the work they had seen women doing to raise funds for breast cancer, Travis Garone and Luke Slattery felt that men should be taking similar action on behalf of their own well-being. So, they challenged 30 of their mates to grow a (sponsored) moustache. The following year, they registered as a company and gave Justin “JC” Coghlan a role as campaign manager.

Their first big campaign was titled Give Prostate Cancer a Kick in the Arse. “We were young men,” says JC. “We got hit hard by the media at the start. We had straight-laced cancer organisations saying, ‘Cancer’s not fun.’ We knew that. But to cut through the stigma, we had to get men having fun together.”

The risk paid off – generously. Today, Movember has raised more than £598m for men’s health causes. Cancer remains a focus, but in recent years, suicide prevention has proved itself more urgent.

“It’s what keeps me awake at night,” says JC. Movember is not a crisis-point charity, and JC’s approach has been to target men and boys whose mental health is average to poor, and ensure it tends towards the former. “That middle area is the game changer,” he says. Many of his initiatives have focused on providing support to marginalised communities, where young men are in desperate need of mentorship or healthy outlets for their energies.

Most recently, he helped to launch Movember Conversations, a tool designed to coach people on broaching difficult topics. “I’m as guilty of getting it wrong as anyone else,” he says. “I hear a problem, and I want to solve it. But people aren’t looking for a solution. They’re looking for support.”

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medicine

Women in medicine make about $116,000 less than men, and the pandemic could be making things worse



a person holding a baby: HRAUN/Getty Images


© HRAUN/Getty Images
HRAUN/Getty Images

  • Medical networking site Doximity released its fourth annual Physician Compensation Report on Thursday.
  • In addition to compensation differences across US cities, the report highlights that women make less than men in all medical specialties. 
  • According to the report, the wage gap is largest for otolaryngology — or the specialty related to ears, noses, and throats — where women make 77.9% of men or a gap of 22.1%.
  • Overall, the gender wage gap in 2020 for doctors is 28%, about three percentage points higher than last year’s report.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus recession has disproportionately hurt working women, and the pressures of balancing work with parenting and household responsibilities amid the pandemic have also affected female doctors.

Medical networking site Doximity just released its fourth annual Physician Compensation Report, and one of the main findings is that the gender wage gap for doctors has widened this year.

The report describes compensation for physicians in various US cities and in different medical specialties. The figures are based on self-reported compensation surveys from 2019 and 2020 that were completed by around 44,000 US physicians.

One notable finding is the various gender wage gaps among medical specialties. Last year’s report showed a declining gap in pay between male and female physicians. However, this year the overall wage gap was 28%, 2.8 percentage points higher than last year’s figure. Women in medicine made about $116,000 less than men, where women make an average salary of around $299,000 compared to the average salary among male doctors of about $415,000. 

“It’s likely that the widening gender pay gap represents another financial consequence of the pandemic. This is a troubling trend economists have previously reported on in other industry sectors,” the company wrote in the report. 

The latest report shows that the pandemic’s effects on working women extends to healthcare, even though the industry is considered essential during the pandemic.  

“What we are thinking is that women have more responsibilities at home and therefore have had to cut back on their hours,” Dr. Peter Alperin, vice president at Doximity, told Business Insider. He also said that overall there’s been a slowing of increases in compensation this year which has especially affected compensation for women in the medical field.

Overall 865,000 women left the workforce in September alone. That is about four times higher than the number of men who dropped out of the workforce that month. NPR reports that more demand within households may be contributing to this large decline of women in the workplace. 

The following chart highlights the medical specialties with the largest gender wage gaps, according to the Doximity report. Otolaryngology, or treating ear, nose, and throat issues, has the largest gap. Women make 77.9% of men’s average annual salaries or is a wage gap of 22.1%. Women in this medical specialty make around $109,000 less than men.  

The following chart highlights the medical specialties with the smallest wage gaps, based on the report.

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health

Young women may be likelier to die after heart attacks than men

Younger women may be more likely to die in the decade following a heart attack than men of the same age, a new study suggests. 

In general, women under age 50 experience fewer heart attacks than men in the same age range. The new study, published Oct. 13 in the European Heart Journal, also reflects this trend; of 2,100 heart attack patients treated at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston between 2000 and 2016, only about 400 were women. The average age of all the patients in the study was 44 years old. 

But over the long-term, these young women were more likely to die than young men. The study authors followed the patients for a median of 11 years, and found that women were 1.6 times more likely to die from any cause than men during that time. 

Related: 9 new ways to keep your heart healthy 

“Notably, the differences in mortality in our study were primarily driven by non-cardiovascular death,” meaning deaths not caused by a heart condition, study author Dr. Ersilia DeFilippis, a cardiology fellow at New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Irving Medical Center, told Live Science in an email. Examples of these non-cardiovascular causes of death included cancer and sepsis, a kind of overblown immune response to an infection. 

Unfortunately, “there were no clear explanations as to why women had lower survival,” DeFilippis noted, though the study revealed a number of factors that may be at play.

“The risk factors for disease of other organs overlap with risk factors for heart disease,” Dr. Marysia Tweet, an assistant professor in Cardiovascular Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, who was not involved in the study, told Live Science in an email. “A heart attack and the ramifications of a heart attack may affect the health of other organs. Long-term mortality is likely due to a combination of multiple factors.”

For instance, women in the study had higher rates of diabetes than the men, as well as higher rates of diseases such rheumatoid arthritis , where joint pain and inflammation are often triggered by an immune system attack. This persistent inflammation may drive the formation of fatty plaques in blood vessels, which can block arteries and lead to a heart attack, according to a 2012 report in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. That same inflammation may also affect how patients recover.

In addition, the women showed higher rates of depression than men in the study. “Depression impacts adherence to healthy lifestyle recommendations and medications,” which could impact women’s long-term survival after a heart attack, Tweet wrote in a commentary also published in the European Heart Journal about the research. But it’s also possible that the physiological changes that coincide with depression independently worsen outcomes; for instance, elevated levels of stress hormones and inflammatory molecules called cytokines could worsen a patient’s prognosis, she wrote.

In general, women are about twice as likely as men to experience stress-induced reduction in blood flow to

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fitness

The Most Influential Men in Fitness: Track Mafia’s Cory Wharton-Malcolm

Track Mafia isn’t a running club – it’s a community. “People don’t just come for the exercise. They come for friendship,” says founder Cory Wharton-Malcolm, “Beefy” to his friends and followers. “At Track Mafia, you’ll meet chefs, illustrators, hospital workers, CEOs, TfL workers… Everyone has a common purpose.” On Thursday nights at Paddington Rec’s athletics track, there is no hierarchy. It’s free, and novices train alongside pros.



a man wearing sunglasses: “Beefy” as he's better known talks about how he went from barely being able to jog to head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app


© Provided by Men’s Health UK
“Beefy” as he’s better known talks about how he went from barely being able to jog to head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app

Groups such as Track Mafia and Run Dem Crew, for which Wharton-Malcolm has also worked, have changed the face of recreational running. It’s been said that the sport attracts a narrow demographic – slim, middle class, white. These crews are the antidote: a home for those who don’t fit the profile, but take their running no less seriously.

When Wharton-Malcolm took up running in preparation for joining the 2007 London Marathon, he could barely jog to the bottom of his road without gassing out. “My friends laughed and said, ‘You’re fat, you smoke, you eat kebabs. How do you plan to do this?’”

They’re probably not laughing now. Today, as well as fronting Track Mafia, Wharton-Malcolm is a head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app, which during lockdown became the fourth most popular app in the UK. He has acted as a speaker in parliament and Buckingham Palace, talking about how sports can be used to engage young people, strengthen communities and reduce antisocial behaviour.

Championing inclusivity remains his MO, including opening up new pathways into top-tier jobs. “I think a lot of organisations feel, ‘If this person wasn’t taught the way I was taught, then they’re not for us. We’ll have to spend too much time showing them how to do things our way.’ But don’t you want to learn how to do things their way, too?”

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fitness

The Most Influential Men in Fitness: Gymshark’s Ben Francis

ben francis gymshark

Noma Bar

“Fuck standing on the sideline. Fuck injustice. Fuck racism.” Where some brands virtue-signalled vaguely in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Gymshark spoke out, donating $125,000 to Black Lives Matter and committing to driving change via its channels.

A “red thread” of community runs through the UK sportswear company, says founder Ben Francis, fresh of face at 28. “We’re super-inclusive, super-caring, super-transparent.” And unlike the older, clunkier competitors that it’s circling, the spandex predator is “extremely agile”. At the start of lockdown, it deftly changed its social media handles to “Homeshark” to remind its fam that: “This ain’t no joke.”

That nimbleness is despite Britain’s fastest-growing fashion label swelling into a £500m megalodon based in Solihull in just eight years. The 500-plus staff also has outposts in Denver, Hong Kong and Mauritius. With no high-street stores, traditional advertising or outside investment, social media has turbo-charged the expansion of Gymshark, which Francis started in his parents’ garage when he was 19, while studying business and management at Aston University by day and working at Pizza Hut by night.

“I wish I could tell you that it was this master plan,” says Francis. As a 16-year-old, he was inspired to join a gym by fitness YouTubers. So, when he and friends began hand-sewing and screen-printing their own clothing, more tapered than traditional bodybuilder apparel, sending samples to their online idols seemed only fitting.

Francis has a big vision, too: “I want us to create the greatest community, and I want us to be the greatest fitness brand on the planet.”

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1

Vital Long Sleeve T-shirt

GymShark’s Vital Long Sleeve T-Shirt is exactly that: vital. It’s lightweight, sweat-wicking and supple enough to keep you cool, calm and collected whether you’re on a run or shifting tin in the gym.

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Power Zip up Hoodie

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£45.00

Oversized and large, this hoodie is perfect for workouts and for lazing on the sofa afterwards.

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Vital Seamless 1/4 Zip Pullover

This 1/4 Zip pullover is perfect for any sport when the temperature drops. Its seamless construction ensures movement is effortless, while still keeping you fresh and focused with sweat-wicking technology.

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Arrival 5″ Shorts

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Rep after rep and step after step, these lightweight sweat-wicking shorts are made for movement.

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Crest Joggers

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