Medicines

medicine

MindMed to Launch Albert, A Digital Medicine Division for Psychedelic Medicines

NEW YORK, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — MindMed (NEO: MMED) (OTCQB: MMEDF) (DE: MMQ), a leading psychedelic medicine biotech company, is establishing a digital medicine division known as Albert. Albert is in the process of assembling and recruiting a leading team of technologists, therapists, and clinical drug development experts to help the company research, develop and build an integrated technical platform and comprehensive toolset aimed at delivering psychedelic inspired medicines and experiential therapies combined with digital therapeutics.

Digital therapeutics are defined as evidence-based therapeutic interventions for patients to prevent, manage, or treat a mental disorder or disease. Pairing digital tools, such as wearables and the latest in machine learning, with psychedelic assisted therapies, can give healthcare providers the ability to optimize and better understand the patient journey and therapeutic outcomes from pre-care through to after-care.

MindMed Co-Founder and Co-CEO J.R. Rahn said, “We believe that the next frontier in psychedelic medicine will be to quantify with great precision psychedelic assisted therapy’s impact on patient populations. This new division will not only build apps, technologies and other platforms to help the patient, but hopefully also make the medical community comfortable with this novel treatment paradigm for mental health and addiction by measuring the potential value to their patient populations and ultimate savings to insurers.”

Recent advancements in digital therapeutics have the potential to enable a real time assessment of efficacy in both clinical trials and real-world settings leading to a more robust understanding of the value of a treatment and long-term impact on patient outcomes.

MindMed’s clinical team under the leadership of President and Head of Clinical Dr. Miri Halperin Wernli is designing an experimental clinical trial that pairs non-hallucinogenic psychedelic inspired medicines such as microdoses of LSD with digital therapeutics to track, engage and influence patient behavior. MindMed intends to announce full details of this clinical trial once MindMed and its scientific collaborators finalize the protocol design for submission to relevant health regulators.

Dr. Miri Halperin Wernli said, “This is a perfect moment for digital medicine solutions to come to patients to help support behavioral change, measure and enhance psychiatric care and health outcomes. Our intention is to use digital therapeutics alongside pharmaceutical medicines to maximize one another’s value to the patient and for the healthcare system. The two classes of medicine, along with psychotherapy and various forms of cognitive behavioral therapies, must be regarded as complementary to enhance outcomes, which will create new opportunities to improve quality of care and patient outcomes and drive behavior change at scale.”

About MindMed

MindMed is a psychedelic medicine biotech company that discovers, develops and deploys psychedelic inspired medicines and therapies to address addiction and mental illness. The company is assembling a compelling drug development pipeline of innovative treatments based on psychedelic substances including Psilocybin, LSD, MDMA, DMT and an Ibogaine derivative, 18-MC. The MindMed executive team brings extensive biopharmaceutical experience to the company’s groundbreaking approach to developing the next-generation of psychedelic inspired medicines and therapies.

MindMed trades on the Canadian

Read More
medicine

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany to deploy Insilico Medicine’s Chemistry42 AI platform for generative chemistry

Since the publication of Ian Goodfellow’s original paper on generative adversarial networks (GANs) in 2014, Insilico Medicine has been developing generative chemistry and generative biology algorithms. In 2016, Insilico Medicine published the first peer-reviewed publication describing the application of GANs to small molecule discovery in oncology. Between 2016 and 2020 Insilico Medicine authored over 40 papers and has been granted several patents in this field. Insilico Medicine has conducted several proof of concept validation experiments that demonstrate that generative models can successfully identify novel targets, and design molecules with desired properties that can be synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo

Chemistry42™ is a core part of Insilico’s Pharma.ai drug discovery suite. It is a flexible, user-friendly software platform that bridges artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning methods with domain expertise in the fields of medicinal and computational chemistry, for the design of novel small molecules with desirable physicochemical properties. The platform is a scalable distributed web application, capable of running multiple tasks in parallel in a matter of hours. Container orchestration and workflow management allow for predictable hardware-agnostic resource allocation, and for the implementation on either cloud or local HPC infrastructures.

We are very happy to have Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany sign on as our very first launch partner as they have substantial experience in the field of AI-powered drug discovery internally and built a world-class computing infrastructure,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder, and CEO, Insilico Medicine.

“Chemistry42 v1.0 is the result of years of comprehensive research in generative chemistry, close collaboration between computational and medicinal chemistry scientists, and best high-performance computing engineering practices. We are excited to work closely with Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany and look forward to demonstrating the impact of our collaboration on their drug discovery programs,” said Alex Zhebrak, PhD, CTO of Insilico Medicine.

“We’re excited to continue to deploy the latest tools in AI,” said Joern-Peter Halle, Global Head of Research for the Healthcare business sector of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany. “AI has the potential to transform the drug discovery process and Insilico Medicine is at the forefront of exciting AI techniques, such as this generative chemistry AI platform.”

About Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, a leading science and technology company, operates across healthcare, life science and performance materials. Around 57,000 employees work to make a positive difference to millions of people’s lives every day by creating more joyful and sustainable ways to live. From advancing gene editing technologies and discovering unique ways to treat the most challenging diseases to enabling the intelligence of devices – the company is everywhere. In 2019, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, generated sales of € 16.2 billion in 66 countries.

The company holds the global rights to the name and trademark “Merck” internationally. The only exceptions are the United States and Canada, where the business sectors of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany operate as EMD Serono in healthcare, MilliporeSigma in life science, and EMD

Read More
medicine

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany to deploy Insilico Medicine’s Chemistry42 AI platform

IMAGE

IMAGE: Insilico announces the first launch partner for Chemistry42
view more 

Credit: Insilico

November 17, 2020, 9:00AM EST– Following the release of Chemistry42 to a select group of key experts in the pharmaceutical industry in Q3 2020, Insilico Medicine is proud to announce that Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany will be the first launch partner for its flagship generative chemistry artificial intelligence (AI) platform – Chemistry42. Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany will integrate Chemistry42™ into their discovery pipeline to facilitate rapid and effective drug design. Chemistry42 v1.0 will be customized and deployed on state-of-the-art high-performance computing (HPC) infrastructure at Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.

Since the publication of Ian Goodfellow’s original paper on generative adversarial networks (GANs) in 2014, Insilico Medicine has been developing generative chemistry and generative biology algorithms. In 2016, Insilico Medicine published the first peer-reviewed publication describing the application of GANs to small molecule discovery in oncology. Between 2016 and 2020 Insilico Medicine authored over 40 papers and has been granted several patents in this field. Insilico Medicine has conducted several proof of concept validation experiments that demonstrate that generative models can successfully identify novel targets, and design molecules with desired properties that can be synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo.

Chemistry42™ is a core part of Insilico’s Pharma.ai drug discovery suite. It is a flexible, user-friendly software platform that bridges artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning methods with domain expertise in the fields of medicinal and computational chemistry, for the design of novel small molecules with desirable physicochemical properties. The platform is a scalable distributed web application, capable of running multiple tasks in parallel in a matter of hours. Container orchestration and workflow management allow for predictable hardware-agnostic resource allocation, and for the implementation on either cloud or local HPC infrastructures.

We are very happy to have Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany sign on as our very first launch partner as they have substantial experience in the field of AI-powered drug discovery internally and built a world-class computing infrastructure,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder, and CEO, Insilico Medicine.

Chemistry42 v1.0 is the result of years of comprehensive research in generative chemistry, close collaboration between computational and medicinal chemistry scientists, and best high-performance computing engineering practices. We are excited to work closely with Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany and look forward to demonstrating the impact of our collaboration on their drug discovery programs,” said Alex Zhebrak, PhD, CTO of Insilico Medicine.

“We’re excited to continue to deploy the latest tools in AI,” said Joern-Peter Halle, Global Head of Research for the Healthcare business sector of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany. “AI has the potential to transform the drug discovery process and Insilico Medicine is at the forefront of exciting AI techniques, such as this generative chemistry AI platform.”

###

About Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, a leading science and technology company, operates across healthcare, life science and performance materials. Around 57,000 employees work to make a positive difference to millions of people’s

Read More
medicine

Qatar- Registration open for Sidra Medicine’s precision medicine symposium

(MENAFN – The Peninsula) Doha: Sidra Medicine is pleased to announce that registrations to its virtual Precision Medicine and Functional Genomics Symposium (PMFG 2020) are now open. The symposium will be hosted online from December 5 to 7.

PMFG 2020 Organizing Co-Chair, Dr. Bernice Lo, Investigator at Sidra Medicine said: ‘We have finalised some very topical discussions this year, including precision medicine solutions for managing COVID-19. We are also going to cover the large-scale discoveries that drive precision medicine as well as lessons from industry and biotechnology sectors.

Attendees to PMFG 2020 will receive 14.25 hours learning credits as approved by the Qatar Council of Healthcare Practitioners. Speakers to PMFG 2020 include Sir Mark Caulfield from Genomics England; Dr. Adolfo Garcia-Sastre from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Dr. Ingrid Scheffer from the University of Melbourne; Dr. Paul Thompson from the University of Southern California and Dr. Virginia Pascual from Cornell University.

MENAFN14112020000063011010ID1101124542


Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, kindly contact the provider above.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Registrations open for Sidra Medicine’s precision medicine symposium

Sidra Medicine has opened registrations for its virtual Precision Medicine and Functional Genomics Symposium (PMFG), to be held online from December 5 to 7.

PMFG 2020 Organising co-chair, Dr Bernice Lo, investigator at Sidra Medicine said, “We have finalised some very topical discussions this year including precision medicine solutions for managing Covid-19. We are also going to cover the large-scale discoveries that drive precision medicine as well as lessons from industry and biotechnology sectors.”

International speakers to PMFG 2020 include Mark Caulfield from Genomics England; Dr Adolfo Garcia-Sastre from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Dr Ingrid Scheffer from the University of Melbourne; Dr Paul Thompson from the University of Southern California and Dr Virginia Pascual from Cornell University.

In addition, attendees will also have access to presentations from Dr Alan Shuldiner from Regeneron Genetics Centre; Dr Stuart Tangye from the Garvan Institute and Dr Lara Mangravite from Sage Bionetworks.

Dr Damien Chaussabel, organising co-chair of PMFG 2020 and director of Sidra Medicine’s Immunology Programme said, “Our cohort of renowned speakers will share their insights about the advancements in precision medicine through data-driven science and research. We are excited that Sidra Medicine is in a very unique position to highlight its own precision medicine journey so far. We look forward to welcoming delegates online from all over the world for this year’s symposium.”

PMFG 2020 will feature live and on-demand programming from invited speakers, as well as provide opportunities for talks from competitive abstract submissions. It will bring together researchers, academics, healthcare professionals, policy makers, partners and the community, to explore the latest developments and innovations in genomics research and how they translate into precision medicine solutions.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

American College of Lifestyle Medicine Launches Bill of Rights to Raise Awareness of Lifestyle Medicine’s Role in Type 2 Diabetes Informed Consent and Treatment

The Bill of Rights is a companion to ACLM’s recently launched “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance with Lifestyle Medicine” 18-hour, 20-module, evidence-based CME/CE accredited online course for physicians and health professionals. This is the first comprehensive educational curriculum offered to equip physicians and other health professionals to treat and reverse type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.  In addition, ACLM recently published a position paper, “Type 2 Diabetes Remission and Lifestyle Medicine: A Position Statement from the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.” ACLM will also present a free webinar, “The Reversibility of Type 2 Diabetes with Lifestyle Medicine—Q & A” on Thursday, Nov. 12 at 12 p.m. CST.

ACLM defines Lifestyle Medicine as the use of an evidence-based, whole food, plant-predominant dietary lifestyle, regular physical activity, restorative sleep, stress management, avoidance of risky substances and positive social connection as a primary therapeutic modality for treatment, reversal and prevention of chronic disease. Addressing lifestyle is the first step in type 2 diabetes and other chronic disease treatment and management guidelines, but it has been overlooked due to a lack of physician training in lifestyle, barriers to practice and a lack of consumer understanding. 

“We believe that a patient does not give fully informed consent if this option is not presented to them at the time of diagnosis,” said ACLM Founding President John Kelly, MD, DipABLM, lead faculty for the new course. “COVID-19 has highlighted the vulnerabilities created by type 2 diabetes, amplifying the urgent need to restore health to those impacted by this lifestyle-related chronic disease, as opposed to simply managing it.”

“COVID-19 has exposed the long-standing issue of racial health disparities in America, as people of color have been disproportionally affected by the pandemic,” said ACLM President Cate Collings, MD, DipABLM.  “While the causes of racial health disparities are many, and include the range of social determinants of health, the most devastating impact is from the significantly higher incidence of chronic disease, most notably type 2 diabetes.

“If you are talking about racial health disparities and are not focused on the disparate impact of type 2 diabetes, you are missing the heart of the matter.”

“Truly addressing racial health disparities will only happen when our nation recognizes the role of lifestyle and trains its clinicians accordingly, fully informs patients, removes the barriers to practicing Lifestyle Medicine and rewards physicians and health professionals for restoring health rather than merely managing disease,” said Kelly. “ACLM is actively addressing each of these areas.”

Diabetes has a devastating impact on the quality of life of millions of Americans.  Treatment for diabetes is also a major contributor to the country’s health care spending. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 90 percent of the nation’s $3.3 trillion in annual health care expenditure pays for the treatment of chronic health conditions, including type 2 diabetes. In the United States

Read More
medicine

Family Medicine’s Founding Principle, and Still Its North Star — FPM

The pandemic and protests have underscored family physicians’ enduring role as a voice for patients in and out of the clinic.

Fam Pract Manag. 2020 Nov-Dec;27(6):5.

When family medicine was founded as a specialty 50 years ago, the goal was to redefine primary care. Family physicians led a transition from hospital-based, disease-focused care to a patient-centered model that championed continuity of care for entire families and emphasized care in clinics and the community. In his 1989 essay, “Family Medicine as Counterculture,” G. Gayle Stephens, MD, described the paradox of practicing medicine as part of the medical establishment, while at the same time advocating to change the establishment.1 Family medicine was born with social justice at its core and has brought that sensibility to the health care system as a whole. The result has been improved access to high-quality health care for all patients, regardless of race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, or financial circumstance.

Fifty years later, family physicians continue to be on the cutting edge of patient-centered care, while advocating strongly for patients outside of the clinic as well. The COVID-19 pandemic and racial justice protests underscore the continued need for that advocacy and provide examples of the tension of playing both roles. Where do family physicians fit in to the politicized public health debates going on across the country? How much should we take our professional personas into the personal, everyday lives we lead outside of the office?

I was thinking about those questions after a recent trip to the grocery store. As I entered the store, I asked one of the employees where I could find a handheld basket. He replied, “We won’t have those back until there is a vaccine for COVID.” I wondered how a handheld basket was different from a shopping cart. Both are touched and can be cleaned before being used by the next customer. Was it my role to point out this faulty reasoning? In this case, I held my tongue. But I certainly would not have stayed quiet if he told me that customers shouldn’t wear face coverings.

What’s the threshold? As family physicians, when and how should we choose to speak up?

The answer to that question goes back to the origins of the specialty. We are advocates for our patients, whether or not we share their political beliefs. There are various levels of advocacy, ranging from personal support (e.g., completing a disabled parking permit application for a patient) to policy support (e.g., advocating that patients have access to affordable health insurance).2 But family physicians are obliged to engage in advocacy at all levels to support our patients and their families. Advocating for policies that support the health of our patients is no longer countercultural; it is inherent to our roles as family physicians.

Source Article

Read More
health

VFMCRP and ChemoCentryx announce European Medicines Agency has accepted to review the Marketing Authorization Application for avacopan

Regulatory News:

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201102005955/en/

Vifor Fresenius Medical Care Renal Pharma (VFMCRP) Ltd. and ChemoCentryx, Inc., today announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) accepted to review the Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) for avacopan for the treatment of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (granulomatosis with polyangitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)), a group of rare and severe autoimmune diseases with high need for targeted therapies.

If approved, avacopan would be the first orally administered selective complement 5a receptor inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Data from the global pivotal phase-III ADVOCATE trial demonstrated statistical superiority in sustaining remission at 52 weeks in the avacopan group compared to the prednisone group. In the trial, the avacopan group also showed significantly lower glucocorticoid toxicity, greater improvement in kidney function and greater improvement in health-related quality of life measures compared to the prednisone group.

The EMA will review the application under the centralized marketing authorization procedure. If approved avacopan would receive marketing authorization in all member states of the European Union (EU), as well as in Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. Approval is expected H2, 2021.

Vifor Pharma Group is a global pharmaceuticals company. It aims to become the global leader in iron deficiency, nephrology and cardio-renal therapies. The company is a partner of choice for pharmaceuticals and innovative patient-focused solutions. Vifor Pharma Group strives to help patients around the world with severe and chronic diseases lead better, healthier lives. The company develops, manufactures and markets pharmaceutical products for precision patient care. Vifor Pharma Group holds a leading position in all its core business activities and consists of the following companies: Vifor Pharma and Vifor Fresenius Medical Care Renal Pharma (a joint company with Fresenius Medical Care). Vifor Pharma Group is headquartered in Switzerland, and listed on the Swiss Stock Exchange (SIX Swiss Exchange, VIFN, ISIN: CH0364749348).

For more information, please visit viforpharma.com

About ChemoCentryx
ChemoCentryx is a biopharmaceutical company developing new medications for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and cancer. ChemoCentryx targets the chemokine and chemoattractant systems to discover, develop and commercialize orally-administered therapies. ChemoCentryx’s lead drug candidate, avacopan (CCX168), successfully completed a pivotal Phase III trial in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

ChemoCentryx also has early stage drug candidates that target chemoattractant receptors in other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and in cancer.

About ADVOCATE and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis
The ADVOCATE trial of avacopan was a global double-blind double-dummied Phase III trial of 331 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (ANCA vasculitis) in 20 countries.

ANCA vasculitis is a systemic disease in which over-activation of the complement pathway further activates neutrophils, leading to inflammation and destruction of small blood vessels. This results in organ damage and failure, with the kidney as a major target. Treatment for ANCA vasculitis consists of courses of immuno-suppressants (cyclophosphamide or rituximab), combined with high-dose and often prolonged use of glucocorticoids which can be associated with significant adverse events. ANCA vasculitis is relapsing and remitting long term condition and patients are at

Read More
medicine

As STAT turns 5, a look back at science and medicine’s biggest headlines

The past five years have been packed with medical and scientific advances, a series of public health crises that have gripped the world, and uproar over rising prescription drug costs.

They’ve also been a heck of a time to launch a publication about health and medicine.

As STAT celebrates its five-year anniversary, our reporters took a look back at six areas we’ve covered closely — CRISPR, infectious disease, the opioid crisis, drug pricing, AI in medicine, and cell and gene therapy — to recap the biggest headlines and controversies and cast an eye to what may lie ahead.

advertisement

Breaker for 5 year

CRISPR: A Nobel, He Jiankui’s bombshell, and an ugly patent fight

Even before STAT published its first stories, we knew CRISPR would be big: Breakthrough scientific papers in 2012 and early 2013 showed that this technique for changing the DNA of plants and animals was so easy to use that labs across the world would seize on it to understand basic biological processes as well as develop cures for genetic diseases. That’s why my first story for STAT profiled one of CRISPR’s inventors, biologist Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute. Check out his “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” analogy.

Sure enough, just five years later, CRISPR became Nobel big: Earlier this month, biochemist Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, and microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors. The award was the first science Nobel won by two women.

advertisement

What I never suspected was how fast a CRISPR nightmare might come true, how agonizingly long drug development takes, and what an ugly fight over patents CRISPR would spawn.

CRISPR’s inventors knew from the get-go that it would be theoretically possible to use the technique to alter the genes of human embryos, creating “designer babies.” That seemed like something a rogue researcher might try in, oh, 10 years. Yet there I was in Hong Kong in November 2018, at the second international conference on human genome editing, when China’s He Jiankui dropped his bombshell: He’d CRISPR’d human embryos, resulting in the birth of twin, genetically altered girls. That ignited a firestorm of condemnation and hand-wringing that the global scientific community hadn’t tried hard enough to stop him.

Also in the hand-wringing category: The fight over CRISPR patents between the Broad Institute and the University of California has been an eye-opener with its legal costs (well into eight figures; think of the science that would buy), ugly accusations, and sheer persistence.

Two happier CRISPR surprises: significant improvements on the original technique and the growing list of human diseases it might treat or cure, if success in lab mice is any indication.

With several companies as well as academic scientists already using CRISPR in clinical trials, one message from 2015 has stuck: CRISPR might actually live up to its hype, becoming the powerhouse genetic cure scientists dreamed of.

— Sharon Begley

Breaker for 5 year

Infectious disease: From

Read More
medicine

Innovative Medicines Canada Responds to Release of Patented Medicine Prices Review Board’s (PMPRB) Final Guidelines

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

OTTAWA, ON / ACCESSWIRE / October 23, 2020 / Innovative Medicines Canada (IMC) issued the following statement today in response to the release of PMPRB’s final Guidelines:

“For the last five years we have raised concerns about the negative impact PMPRB’s amendments to the Patented Medicines Guidelines and Regulations will have on Canadian patients. The final Guidelines released today do nothing to relieve those concerns.

“If implemented, they will have a negative impact on Canadian patients. Specifically, innovative new medicines will not launch in Canada, depriving patients of potentially life-changing new treatments; we will see further reductions in the number of clinical trials in this country; and our life sciences sector will lose out on critical investments.

“The height of a global public health crisis is the worst possible time to implement regulatory changes that will have such a direct and negative impact on Canadian patients. This is made even worse because the Guidelines released today are the result of an inadequate consultation process that largely ignored the significant concerns raised by industry, patients, researchers and others.

“Fortunately, there is still time to find a better path. Our members remain committed to their offer to work with government on a solution that meets their important public policy objectives, without undermining Canadians’ access to new medicines, or driving away investment.

“In the meantime, we will continue to ask that Health Canada delay the January 01, 2021 implementation of the final PMPRB Guidelines until after the COVID-19 crisis is passed. At this time our collective focus should only be on the discovery, development and delivery of COVID-19 medicines to treat those infected by the virus, and vaccines to halt its spread.”

About Innovative Medicines Canada

Innovative Medicines Canada is the national voice of Canada’s innovative pharmaceutical industry. We advocate for policies that enable the discovery, development and commercialization of innovative medicines and vaccines that improve the lives of all Canadians. We support our members’ commitment to being valued partners in the Canadian healthcare system.

For further information:

Samantha Thompson

Media Relations

Telephone: 613-790-4555

E-mail:

SOURCE: Innovative Medicines Canada

View source version on accesswire.com:

https://www.accesswire.com/611988/Innovative-Medicines-Canada-Responds-to-Release-of-Patented-Medicine-Prices-Review-Boards-PMPRB-Final-Guidelines

Source Article

Read More