medicine

medicine

Over The Moon: How Margaret Cho helped Ken Jeong choose comedy over medicine

Ken Jeong has had many scene-stealing roles in his second career, including that star-making turn in The Hangover trilogy and as the anarchic Chang in Community.

And while many know that he was a real-life doctor specialising in internal medicine while doing stand-up comedy on the side before choosing acting full-time in 2006, what they may not know is that it was fellow Asian-American comic Margaret Cho who really encouraged him.

“I was inspired by Margaret. I got my start in comedy because of Margaret,” Jeong told news.com.au. “When I was in medical school and being her opening act at university inspired me to do this full-time. I would always ask Margaret, ‘Should I quit being a doctor? Should I quit medicine?’.

“I was so tortured, and I know I annoyed her. And she was so patient with me and so loving. It was just like a sibling – and it got me through my own internal confidence crises.

“Margaret really is a pioneer in so many ways. Every Asian-American comedian owes a debt of gratitude to Margaret. Also, when I developed my own show, Dr Ken, I had Margaret as my character’s sister for a reason.”

Jeong and Cho reunite this week in Netflix movie Over The Moon, an animated film which tells a modern story based on an ancient Chinese legend about moon goddess Chang’e and her significance to Chinese cultures that celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Ken Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
media_cameraKen Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
Margaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s
media_cameraMargaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s

Jeong voices a mythical moon creature named Gobi, who plays guide to young heroine Fei Fei while Cho voices one of Fei Fei’s aunts.

The film drops on Netflix this week and also features the voice talents of John Cho, Philippa Soo, Sandra Oh, Kimiko Glenn and newcomer Cathy Yan.

Over The Moon is an often strange, often tender and often musical movie pitched at families, but for the Asian diaspora community, it’ll have extra resonance.

Cho told news.com.au that she signed on for the role because it was “a beautiful story” that moved her while Jeong identified the film as part of a wave of change when it comes to Asian-American representation in Hollywood.

“I think the script and the story was so novel, and then also finding it’s an all Asian-American cast – like my dear friend Margaret and then John Cho, Phillipa Soo from Hamilton, Cathy Yan who really is a centrepiece of this movie,” Jeong said. “So you have this incredible Asian-American talent and on the heels of Crazy Rich Asians, Searching, Tigertail and Always Be My Maybe, there is like a wave. And it’s really nice to have that wave extend to the world of animation.”

RELATED: Rose Matafeo’s teenage geek-out over future co-star

Cho, who has been steadily working for almost 30 years, has been part of that wave when it was barely a trickle. She starred

Read More
medicine

Does Your Health Insurance Cover Alternative Medicine?

It’s still known as alternative medicine, but services like chiropractic care, acupuncture and therapeutic massage are not that alternative anymore. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, almost 40% of adults and 12% of children use complementary or alternative medicine, or CAM, to stay healthy and treat chronic or severe conditions.

Many more would likely use some kind of complementary or alternative treatment if it were covered by their insurance company. While many carriers cover a few services under certain circumstances, most CAM treatments are not covered, forcing patients to pay for it out of their own pocket.

Data from a 2016 study led by the NCCIH suggest that Americans are more and more willing to pay those out-of-pocket charges. Between 2002 and 2012, those who saw a chiropractor rose from 7.5% to 8.3%. The numbers were 1.1% to 1.5% for acupuncture and 5% to 6.9% for massage. Interestingly, usage rates stayed the same for those who had at least some insurance covering the care, but they went up among those who lacked coverage.

For those looking to have complementary or alternative treatments covered, here is what you should know.

[Read: 5 Places to Get Health Care That Aren’t a Clinic.]

CAM Coverage Varies

The NCCIH says that Americans spend about $30.2 billion each year out-of-pocket on complementary health products and practices beyond what their insurance covers. This includes:

— $14.7 billion for visits to such practitioners as chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists.

— $12.8 billion on natural products.

— About $2.7 billion on self-care approaches, including homeopathic medicines and self-help materials, such as books or CDs, related to complementary health topics.

The 2016 study found that 60% of the respondents who had chiropractic care had at least some insurance coverage for it in 2012, but those rates were much lower for acupuncture (25%) and massage (15%). Partial insurance coverage was more common than complete coverage. For chiropractic, nearly 40% of respondents had no coverage, 41.4% had partial and 18.7% had complete coverage. For acupuncture, the breakdown was 75%, 16.5% and 8.55%, and for massage, it was 84.7%, 8.35% and 7%.

The NCCIH says the following complementary or alternative treatments are most often covered to some degree:

Chiropractic: 91% of big insurance companies cover prescribed chiropractic care, most limited to between 15 to 25 prescribed visits with a $20 to $30 copay.

Acupuncture: 32% of big insurance firms cover acupuncture, usually limited to about 20 visits annually.

Massage: Roughly 17% of large insurance firms cover massage therapy, typically if physical therapy and medication hasn’t helped.

Homeopathy: Only 11% of major insurers cover homeopathic remedies.

Hypnosis: Insurers that cover hypnosis require physician authorization, and they typically cover only 50% to 70% of costs.

Biofeedback: Only a few insurers cover the mind-body technique biofeedback, and when they do it’s only for a documented condition like migraines or fibromyalgia.

Naturopathy: Insurers are more likely to cover a licensed naturopath, but only 19

Read More
medicine

Marc Lipsitch, Pardis Sabeti elected to National Academy of Medicine | News

October 20, 2020 – Two Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health faculty members, Marc Lipsitch and Pardis Sabeti, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Membership is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievements and commitment to service.

Lipsitch is a professor of epidemiology with a primary appointment in the Department of Epidemiology and a joint appointment in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases. He also directs the School’s Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics. Lipsitch’s research concerns the effect of naturally acquired host immunity, vaccine-induced immunity, and other public health interventions, such as antimicrobial use, on the population biology of pathogens and the consequences of changing pathogen populations for human health. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Lipsitch has been at the forefront of the School’s public response, keeping policymakers, the public, and the scientific community informed about the trajectory of the pandemic and ways to stop its spread. NAM recognized Lipsitch for making major immunologic, genomic, and evolutionary advances in understanding pneumococcal biology, contributing to defining influenza seasonality mechanisms, and making large contributions to computational and statistical methods for vaccine evaluation.

Sabeti is a professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard Chan School. She is also a professor at the Harvard FAS Center for Systems Biology and the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, an institute member of the Broad Institute, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Her lab focuses on developing new analytical and genomic methods to study evolutionary adaptation and genetic diversity in humans and pathogens, with three current research foci: identifying and characterizing the underlying adaptive changes that have shaped the human species over time; investigating genetic diversity in pathogens such as Lassa virus, Ebola virus, Zika virus, and Babesia microti, with the goal of improving diagnostics, surveillance, and interventions; and developing novel tools to detect and diagnose microbes causing human morbidity and mortality. NAM recognized Sabeti for her leadership in generating and releasing the first viral genome data during the 2013–2016 West African Ebola outbreak to advance countermeasures in the response, and noted that her team’s work in genomics, information theory, diagnostics, rural surveillance, and education have further contributed to efforts to combat Zika, Lassa, Ebola, malaria, and many other infectious diseases.

The National Academy of Medicine is an independent organization of professionals from diverse fields including health and medicine; the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; and beyond. It serves alongside the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering as an adviser to the nation and the international community.

Read the National Academy of Medicine press release: National Academy of Medicine Elects 100 New Members

(function(d, s, id){ var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;} js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Alternative Medicine: Is It Covered?

It’s still known as alternative medicine, but services like chiropractic care, acupuncture and therapeutic massage are not that alternative anymore. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, almost 40% of adults and 12% of children use complementary or alternative medicine, or CAM, to stay healthy and treat chronic or severe conditions.

(Getty Images)

Many more would likely use some kind of complementary or alternative treatment if it were covered by their insurance company. While many carriers cover a few services under certain circumstances, most CAM treatments are not covered, forcing patients to pay for it out of their own pocket.

Data from a 2016 study led by the NCCIH suggest that Americans are more and more willing to pay those out-of-pocket charges. Between 2002 and 2012, those who saw a chiropractor rose from 7.5% to 8.3%. The numbers were 1.1% to 1.5% for acupuncture and 5% to 6.9% for massage. Interestingly, usage rates stayed the same for those who had at least some insurance covering the care, but they went up among those who lacked coverage.

For those looking to have complementary or alternative treatments covered, here is what you should know.

CAM Coverage Varies

The NCCIH says that Americans spend about $30.2 billion each year out-of-pocket on complementary health products and practices beyond what their insurance covers. This includes:

  • $14.7 billion for visits to such practitioners as chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists.
  • $12.8 billion on natural products.
  • About $2.7 billion on self-care approaches, including homeopathic medicines and self-help materials, such as books or CDs, related to complementary health topics.

The 2016 study found that 60% of the respondents who had chiropractic care had at least some insurance coverage for it in 2012, but those rates were much lower for acupuncture (25%) and massage (15%). Partial insurance coverage was more common than complete coverage. For chiropractic, nearly 40% of respondents had no coverage, 41.4% had partial and 18.7% had complete coverage. For acupuncture, the breakdown was 75%, 16.5% and 8.55%, and for massage, it was 84.7%, 8.35% and 7%.

The NCCIH says the following complementary or alternative treatments are most often covered to some degree:

  • Chiropractic: 91% of big insurance companies cover prescribed chiropractic care, most limited to between 15 to 25 prescribed visits with a $20 to $30 copay.
  • Acupuncture: 32% of big insurance firms cover acupuncture, usually limited to about 20 visits annually.
  • Massage: Roughly 17% of large insurance firms cover massage therapy, typically if physical therapy and medication hasn’t helped.
  • Homeopathy: Only 11% of major insurers cover homeopathic remedies.
  • Hypnosis: Insurers that cover hypnosis require physician authorization, and they typically cover only 50% to 70% of costs.
  • Biofeedback: Only a few insurers cover the mind-body technique biofeedback, and when they do it’s only for a documented condition like migraines or fibromyalgia.
  • Naturopathy: Insurers are more likely to cover a licensed naturopath, but only 19 states have such licensure.

Those are averages, of course, and some plans cover a lot more than others. The Capital

Read More
medicine

Five Penn Faculty Members Elected to The National Academy of Medicine


Five faculty members from The University of Pennsylvania have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) — one of the nation’s highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Dr. William Beltran of the school of veterinary medicine; Dr. Matthew McHugh of the school of nursing, and Drs. Ronald DeMatteo, Raina Merchant, and Hongjun Song of the Perelman School of Medicine are among the 100 new members, who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

 

 

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Sidra Medicine joins hands with MoPH in ‘Are you ok’ campaign

Sidra Medicine, a Qatar Foundation entity, has partnered with the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) in its national mental health and wellness campaign ‘Are you ok’ to highlight the support services available for women, children and young people in Qatar.

“The (coronavirus) pandemic has changed the landscape regarding the critical need for robust mental health support systems. It is very assuring and speaks of the calibre of the healthcare services in Qatar, to see how the Ministry of Public Health and Sidra Medicine have rapidly mobilised to keep mental health on top of the country’s service agenda,” Professor Muhammed Waqar Azeem, the chair of Psychiatry at Sidra Medicine said.

“At Sidra Medicine, we remain committed to supporting the people of Qatar, particularly children, young people and perinatal women in meeting their mental healthcare needs. In addition to world class mental health services, our Department of Psychiatry has started a number of educational and training programmes and is also involved in various leading-edge mental health-related research projects.”

Sidra Medicine offers Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Adolescent Medicine and Perinatal Mental Health services in Qatar. The services are either referral-based (in the case of children) or self-referral/ direct (perinatal mental health services).

Sidra Medicine’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is available for children aged 5 to 18 years and includes outpatient, inpatient, consultation liaison and emergency care.

The service can be accessed via referral from Primary Health Care Centres, private clinics, schools and other sources.

“As part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen mental health support services, we have focused on patient care, education to build local human resources, research and building community models of care in Qatar. The success of our programme is based on the collaboration of patients, their relatives and our staff, who all work to help achieve patient goals to live their lives as fully possible. I am also proud of our team’s achieving accreditation for the world’s first Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International (ACGMEI),” Dr Ahsan Nazeer, division chief of CAHMS at Sidra Medicine, said.

“Our advice to parents dealing with children with anxiety, especially during this time, is to encourage their children to share their concerns and have frank and open discussions about their fears and concerns. It is also important that children obtain accurate information from reliable sources. We also encourage parents to focus on instilling a sense of hope and optimism in their children by role modelling appropriate positive behaviuors,” Nazeer said.

Dr Alanoud al-Ansari, division chief of Adolescent Medicine whose clinic provides developmentally appropriate mental health and medical care for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years, has seen a rise in anxiety in teenagers.

“Teenagers are manifesting their anxiety around loss of control and unpredictability through eating disorders, depression and cutting themselves. Many of them have not been able to cope with being back at school. Despite families being in lockdown and opting to stay home during the pandemic, many families while

Read More
medicine

DVIDS – News – Aerospace Medicine Implements Return to Flight Duty Status Guidelines for Aircrew Affected by COVID-19


As much of the military works to maintain readiness in the face of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), Aerospace medicine providers are working to implement a guideline with a set of return to flight duty status protocols. The guideline describes how Service members who are in a ‘down’ flight status may safely return to an ‘up’ flight status after close contact or contracting COVID-19.

These protocols were developed in response to Navy and Marine Corps Aerospace Medicine COVID-19 cases and are promulgated to synchronize the community’s approach to medical evaluation when returning aircrew to flight duty status. The protocols within the guideline are reviewed biweekly to incorporate the most updated national guidelines and current published research.

“The return to flight duty status guideline is critical to maintaining operational readiness amongst our aircrew and return them safely to the cockpit,” said CDR Allen Hoffman, Branch Head of Aerospace Medicine Programs at the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.

These protocols provide a basic framework for our squadron flight surgeons who will also use their sound clinical judgement when comprehensively evaluating each patient. The guideline details step by step how aircrew can return to flight duty status if they are determined to have contracted the virus or had close contact with someone who has contracted COVID-19.

“There are important clinical criteria for aerospace providers to follow if aircrew contracts COVID-19. For example, it is imperative that the provider follow-up with the infected individual once they have recovered to determine if they have optimal respiratory function and returned to a the physical fitness level necessary to safely operate in the flight environment,” said CDR Hoffman.

To know whether affected aircrew are able to safely operate an aircraft, they must meet set physical standards during a series of tests, including a physical exercise tolerance test. Some of those tests help determine if there are still any remaining functionally limiting damage caused by COVID-19.

“The medical evaluation and information in the guidance will ensure our aircrew are ready to fly after contracting COVID-19. Their health and safety is our first and foremost mission in supporting the warfighter,” said CDR Hoffman.

The official guidance will be published in the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute’s, Aerospace Reference and Waiver Guide by mid-November.

Navy Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 personnel that provide health care support to the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, their families and veterans in high operational tempo environments, at expeditionary medical facilities, medical treatment facilities, hospitals, clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world.

For more information about Navy Medicine, visit www.med.navy.mil





Date Taken: 10.20.2020
Date Posted: 10.20.2020 15:19
Story ID: 381341
Location: FALLS CHURCH, VA, US 




Web Views: 3
Downloads: 0
Podcast Hits: 0


PUBLIC DOMAIN  

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Loss of funding means closure for maternity clinic which delivers half of Medicine Hat’s babies

A maternity clinic that delivers about half the babies in Medicine Hat has announced it will no longer accept new patients by the end of January, and will be closed by the end of July unless new funding can be found.

While family physicians typically pay their own overhead, a gap in Medicine Hat’s obstetric services in the mid-2000s led to the creation of the Family Medicine Maternity Clinic.

Funding was provided by the local Primary Care Network (PCN) and Palliser Health, which later merged with the other regional health authorities to form Alberta Health Services. 

Dr. Gerry Prince, a family doctor who helped establish the clinic in 2006, told the Calgary Eyeopener on Monday that the clinic will be closing because the PCN’s funding is due to end in March, and AHS wants the clinic to cover the overhead that includes rent, utilities and all staffing costs.

Prince said this would be impossible, as the costs to run the maternity clinic are roughly double the amount of what it can bill for patient services — and the doctors are already paying overhead for their family practices. 

“[The clinic] is closing because AHS is backing out of our partnership, and says that they want to rent us the space that we’ve been able to occupy for the last 17 years with their support,” Prince said.

“And the numbers they’ve given us are just impossible. So, they’ve given us an overhead number, which is about double the amount of billing that we would actually do through the clinic in a year.… Our guys, you know, as much as they love it, just — there’s no way you can do that.”

A ‘flawless service’

The Family Medicine Maternity Clinic was established due to a crisis of accessibility, Prince said. At the time, obstetrics was a declining service in the area.

“There [were] fewer and fewer physicians doing it, and got down to the point where there were only two family docs delivering about half of the babies in town — as well as running the regular community clinic,” Prince said.

“It was becoming quickly unmanageable.”

Prince said that some of the local doctors turned to health authorities and asked for help. 

The regional health authority agreed, and later partnered with the Primary Care Network to meet the community need. The clinic was established, attached to the Medicine Hat Regional Hospital.

“We went with this idea of a maternity clinic, a dedicated care centre, and they helped support it. And ultimately, we built a specified, designated, custom-design clinic area in our new ambulatory care building,” Prince said.

Eventually, Prince said, that clinic would deliver 500 to 600 babies a year.

“We’ve had a flawless service that’s been providing great care for 17 years.”

Soon, it’s all coming to an end — and why is complicated.

“The docs want to provide the services, we just need to be able to manage it financially. So the real question is, whose job is it [to save

Read More
medicine

Stanford Medicine magazine reports on COVID-19 | News Center

The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features a special report on the COVID-19 pandemic, including perspectives from national public health leaders and articles about the response at Stanford Medicine, where health care workers, researchers, students and administrative staff have mobilized to subdue the virus in the local community and beyond.  

Among the voices in the issue are Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Sara Cody, MD, who as the health officer for Santa Clara County, California, ordered the first U.S. lockdown in response to the virus.

Articles in the issue take readers back to the beginning of the pandemic, when Stanford Health Care was bracing for a potential surge of terribly ill, highly infectious patients for whom no established treatments were available. The Stanford Medicine community came together — in person and virtually — to research treatment protocols and seek solutions, and became one of the first U.S. academic medical centers to develop a COVID-19 test for active infections.  

It’s hard to feel optimistic during this crisis, but that’s the outlook of Yvonne Maldonado, MD, a doctor at the heart of Stanford Medicine’s response to COVID-19, who is profiled in this issue and featured in a podcast and video. An epidemiologist who began her career battling AIDS in the early years of the epidemic, Maldonado has been a key adviser on clinical operations and research efforts during the coronavirus pandemic, working 14-18 hour days since the U.S. outbreak. Though Maldonado, chief of infection prevention and control at Stanford Children’s Health, spends many of those hours guiding policy and research, she continues to treat patients and is leading many research projects of her own. 

Several months into the crisis, her attitude remained upbeat. “I was always hopeful, and I still have hope,” she said. “We can conquer this disease. We’ve conquered other diseases like this or worse.”

The issue also includes:

-A recounting of Stanford Medicine’s response to the virus, involving a prescient decision to stockpile personal protective equipment such as masks, a modeling group dedicated to charting the pandemic’s trajectory, an early drive-through testing option, the ad hoc creation of a company to design and print face masks, and a compilation of best-practices guidelines, shared online, for treating COVID-19 patients. 

-A sampler of the hundreds of projects being conducted by Stanford researchers to arrest the pandemic, from CRISPR-based therapeutic nasal spray to genetic studies zeroing in on who’s most at risk for the disease.

-A Q&A with Fauci, one of the nation’s most trusted sources of information about the pandemic, in which he talks with the medical school’s dean, Lloyd Minor, MD, about how we can beat COVID-19 and face down future pandemics. A video of the conversation is also available.

-A Q&A with Cody on the heartbreak of fighting COVID-19 in the Bay Area and what keeps her going (online only).

-A primer on viruses, focusing on SARS CoV-2 and ways scientists are trying to thwart it.  

-A hair-raising

Read More
medicine

Faculty voice: What is osteopathic medicine? A D.O. explains | MSUToday

MSU’s Andrea Amalfitano, dean of MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and and Heritage Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, wrote this piece for The Conversation, an independent collaboration between editors and academics that provides informed news analysis and commentary to the general public. See the entire list of articles written by MSU faculty for the conversation.

 

Andrea Amalfitano is a doctor of osteopathic medicine, or D.O., and dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine. He explains some of the foundations of the profession and its guiding principle: to use holistic approaches to care for and guide patients. And don’t worry, yes, D.O.s are “real doctors” and have full practice rights across the U.S.

 

When President Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19, many Americans noticed that his physician had the title D.O. stitched onto his white coat. Much confusion ensued about doctors of osteopathic medicine. As of a 2018 census, they made up 9.1% of physicians in the United States. How do they fit into the broader medical field?

 

How did osteopathic medicine get started?

 

In the years after the Civil War, without antibiotics and vaccines, many clinicians of the day relied on techniques like arsenic, castor oil, mercury and bloodletting to treat the ill. Unsanitary surgical practices were standard. These “treatments” promised cures but often led to more sickness and pain.

 

In response to that dreadful state of affairs, a group of American physicians founded the osteopathic medical profession. They asserted that maintaining wellness and preventing disease was paramount. They believed that preserving health was best achieved via a holistic medical understanding of the individual patients, their families and their communities in mind, body and spirit. They rejected reductionist interactions meant to rapidly address only acute symptoms or problems.

 

They also embraced the concept that the human body has an inherent capacity to heal itself — decades before the immune system’s complexities were understood — and called for this ability to be respected and harnessed.

 

What do osteopathic doctors do today?

 

Doctors of osteopathic medicine — D.O.s, for short – can prescribe medication and practice all medical and surgical specialties just as their M.D. counterparts do. Because of the focus on preserving wellness rather than waiting to treat symptoms as they arise, more than half of D.O.s gravitate to primary care, including family practice and pediatrics, particularly in rural and underserved areas.


Andrea Amalfitano

Andrea Amalfitano, dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine and Osteopathic Heritage Foundation Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

 

D.O. training embraces the logic that understanding anatomic structures can allow one to better understand how they function. For example, alongside contemporary medical and surgical preventive and treatment knowledge, all osteopathic physicians also learn strategies to treat musculoskeletal pain and disease. These techniques are known as “manual medicine,” or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). They can provide patients an alternative to medications, including opioids, or invasive surgical interventions.

 

D.O.s pride themselves on making sure their patients feel they’re treated as a whole person

Read More