Medicare

fitness

More Seniors Turn to The Silver&Fit Program During Medicare Open Enrollment for Broader Choices of Virtual Home Exercise and Fitness Solutions

The Silver&Fit program’s virtual, online home-based options and gym-based options are designed to accommodate all levels of fitness and workout preferences. Features include: 

  • 1,700+ Digital Fitness Videos. The Silver&Fit online video library provides a broad collection of workout options, allowing members to customize their own at-home exercise routines including cardio, strength, yoga, dance, Tai Chi, and many others.
  • At-Home Fitness Kits. For those who want to create or enhance their own workouts at home, the Silver&Fit program offers home fitness kits. Kits may include a yoga mat, resistance bands, dumbbells, or wearable fitness trackers.
  • Live Telephone Coaching. Members seeking help with fitness goals or lifestyle improvements can work with a live coach over the phone to obtain advice on fitness, social isolation, sleep, and other healthy living habits.
  • Access to Social and Community Connections. Silver&Fit members can browse information and links to more than 120,000 social organizations ranging from chess, painting, and classic car clubs, to nature organizations. This resource encourages members to join in on club video programs or socially distanced meetings to safely connect with other like-minded individuals.
  • In-Person Gym Access. As gyms are permitted to open, members who feel comfortable returning can use their subsidized gym benefit to get back on their fitness track. With the Silver&Fit program, seniors can choose from a nation-wide network of more than 15,000 fitness centers, YMCAs, and fitness studios.

For information about whether your Medicare plan includes the Silver&Fit program, contact your health plan or 1-800-MEDICARE. Visit www.SilverandFit.com for more information about the program.

About American Specialty Health Fitness, Inc. (ASH Fitness):
ASH Fitness, a subsidiary of American Specialty Health Incorporated (ASH), provides no-cost and low-cost fitness and exercise programs for Medicare beneficiaries and group retirees (through the Silver&Fit® program), and for commercial health plan members and employer groups (through the Active&Fit®, Active&Fit DirectTM, and ExerciseRewardsTM products). ASH is one of the nation’s premier independent and privately-owned specialty health services organizations. For more information, visit www.ashcompanies.com or call 800-848-3555. Follow us on LinkedIn or Twitter at @ASHCompanies.

About Silver&Fit’s Daily Free, Publicly Available Facebook Live and YouTube Workouts:
Silver&Fit also offers four daily free older-adult workouts for the public on Facebook Live or YouTube. Anyone can join these popular exercise classes tailored to the needs of older adults. These half-hour classes premiere Monday through Friday on Facebook Live and YouTube at 9 AM PT, 10 AM PT, 11 AM PT and Noon PT. Participants may also use the workout videos later, since they remain available on YouTube for two weeks after they premiere. Classes include cardio, yoga, strength, flexibility, and others taught at various levels, from beginner to intermediate to advanced. All classes are taught by certified instructors with experience creating classes. To participate in a free exercise class, follow Silver&Fit on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SilverandFit or view the classes at

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medicine

‘If Democrats Run On Medicare For All, Defund The Police, Socialized Medicine, We Won’t Win’

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) issued a warning to Democrats on a caucus call on Thursday, urging them to stay away from progressive positions as the Party potentially faces pivotal run-off races in the battleground state of Georgia, Politico reports.

If “we are going to run on Medicare for All, defund the police, socialized medicine, we’re not going to win,” Clyburn said to people on the call..

Speaker Nancy Pelosi also urged the caucus to focus on an “agenda of lowering health care, better paychecks, building infrastructure.” 

“This has been a life or death fight for the very fate of our democracy. We did not win every battle, but we did win the war,” Pelosi reportedly said. “We held the House. Joe Biden is on a clear path to be the next president of the United States.”

While the Democratic Party managed to hold on to the House, control of the Senate could come down to two Georgia races—GOP Sen. David Perdue facing off against Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff and GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler against Democratic candidate Rev. Raphael Warnock, senior pastor of the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

Read more at Politico.com.

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Source Article

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health

Dr. Philip Lee Is Dead at 96; Engineered Introduction of Medicare

Dr. Philip R. Lee, who as a leading federal health official and fighter for social justice under President Lyndon B. Johnson wielded government Medicare money as a cudgel to desegregate the nation’s hospitals in the 1960s, died on Oct. 27 in a hospital in Manhattan. He was 96.

The cause was heart arrhythmia, his wife, Dr. Roz Lasker, said.

From his office at the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, as the assistant secretary for health and scientific affairs from 1965 to 1969, Dr. Lee engineered the introduction of Medicare, which was established for older Americans in 1965, one year after Johnson had bulldozed his landmark civil-rights bill through Congress.

“To Phil, Medicare wasn’t just a ‘big law’ expanding coverage; it was a vehicle to address racial and economic injustice,” his nephew Peter Lee, the executive director of Covered California, which runs the state’s health care marketplace under the Affordable Care Act, was quoted as saying in a tribute by the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Lee was the university’s chancellor from 1969 to 1972, after leaving the Johnson administration.

Dr. Lee’s use of Medicare funding to desegregate hospitals “changed the economic lives of millions of seniors,” Mr. Lee added.

Provisions in the Medicare legislation subjected 7,000 hospitals nationwide to rules barring discrimination against patients on the basis of race, creed or national origin. The law required equal treatment across the board — from medical and nursing care to bed assignments and cafeteria and restroom privileges — and barred discrimination in hiring, training or promotion.

Before the law took effect in 1966, fewer than half the hospitals in the country met the desegregation standard and less than 25 percent did in the South.

“I remember during one of my visits,” Dr. Lee told the journal of the American Society on Aging in 2015, “a cardiologist at Georgia Baptist Hospital told me, ‘Well, you know, Dr. Lee, if I put a nigger in with one of my white patients, it would kill the patient. My patient would die of a heart attack.’”

By February 1967, a year or less after many of the law’s provisions had taken effect, 95 percent of hospitals were compliant, Dr. Lee said.

“He was largely responsible for that effort,” said Professor David Barton Smith of Drexel University and author of “The Power to Heal: Civil Rights, Medicare and the Struggle to Transform America’s Health System” (2016).

Dr. Lee hailed from a family of physicians — his father and four siblings were doctors — and while working in the Palo Alto Medical Clinic (now the Palo Alto Medical Foundation), which his father founded, he saw firsthand the effects on the poor and the elderly of inadequate health care and the lack of insurance coverage.

As early as 1961, he was a consultant on aging to the Santa Clara Department of Welfare in California, and as a member of the American Medical Association and a Republican at the time, he defied both the A.M.A. and his party

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health

Medicare Fines Hospitals for Too Many Readmissions



 

Nearly half the nation’s hospitals, many of which are still wrestling with the financial fallout of the unexpected coronavirus, will get lower payments for all Medicare patients because of their history of readmitting patients, federal records show.

The penalties are the ninth annual round of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program created as part of the Affordable Care Act’s broader effort to improve quality and lower costs. The latest penalties are calculated using each hospital case history between July 2016 and June 2019, so the flood of coronavirus patients that have swamped hospitals this year were not included.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced in September it may suspend the penalty program in the future if the chaos surrounding the pandemic, including the spring’s moratorium on elective surgeries, makes it too difficult to assess hospital performance.

For this year, the penalties remain in effect. Retroactive to the federal fiscal year that began Oct. 1, Medicare will lower a year’s worth of payments to 2,545 hospitals, the data show. The average reduction is 0.69%, with 613 hospitals receiving a penalty of 1% or more.

Out of 5,267 hospitals in the country, Congress has exempted 2,176 from the threat of penalties, either because they are critical access hospitals — defined as the only inpatient facility in an area — or hospitals that specialize in psychiatric patients, children, veterans, rehabilitation or long-term care. Of the 3,080 hospitals CMS evaluated, 83% received a penalty.

The number and severity of penalties were comparable to those of recent years, although the number of hospitals receiving the maximum penalty of 3% dropped from 56 to 39. Because the penalties are applied to new admission payments, the total dollar amount each hospital will lose will not be known until after the fiscal year ends on July 30.

“It’s unfortunate that hospitals will face readmission penalties in fiscal year 2021,” said Akin Demehin, director of policy at the American Hospital Association. “Given the financial strain that hospitals are under, every dollar counts, and the impact of any penalty is significant.”

The penalties are based on readmissions of Medicare patients who initially came to the hospital with diagnoses of congestive heart failure, heart attack, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hip or knee replacement or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Medicare counts as a readmission any of those patients who ended up back in any hospital within 30 days of discharge, except for planned returns like a second phase of surgery.

A hospital will be penalized if its readmission rate is higher than expected given the national trends in any one of those categories.

The industry has disapproved of the program since its inception, complaining the measures aren’t precise and it unfairly punishes hospitals that treat low-income patients, who often don’t have the resources to ensure their recoveries are successful.

Michael Millenson, a health quality consultant who focuses on patient safety, said the penalties are a useful but imperfect mechanism to push hospitals to improve their care. The designers of

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health

Coronavirus-laden nursing home loses federal Medicare funding

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after an investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths.

An onsite investigation at Andbe Home, Inc. in Norton, Kansas, revealed noncompliance with federal requirements for long-term care facilities, according to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) documents obtained by Fox News. 

The survey investigation by the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services cited “widespread immediate jeopardy” to resident health and safety, according to the documents. The facility was also slammed with a $14,860 federal civil money penalty while it worked to correct noncompliance back in May.

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 

A Kansas nursing home has lost its federal Medicare funding after a state investigation revealed faulty practices led to widespread coronavirus infection and 10 deaths. 
(iStock)

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Stephen Crystal, director of the Center for Health Services Research at the Rutgers Institute for Health, told Fox News that the move marks CMS’ “ultimate penalty; decertifying a facility.”

“Most of the time, they try very hard do other things before they go to that step [like civil monetary penalties],” he said, adding “CMS actually doesn’t do this very often, and one could argue that they haven’t moved quickly enough on other facilities that had out of control spread,” referencing New Jersey and New York as examples.

In the case of the Kansas facility, staff identified two symptomatic patients on Oct. 5 and confirmed positive test results two days later but failed to separate them from the rest of the residents.

‘ALARMING RATE’ OF CORONAVIRUS INFECTION AMONG GROCERY STORE WORKERS, STUDY FINDS

“During this time, COVID-19 positive residents cohorted with COVID-19 negative residents, with only a curtain between them, against [Centers for Disease and Prevention Control] guidelines and best practice to prevent the spread of highly contagious COVID-19,” said the documents obtained by Fox News. The facility also allowed communal dining for two days after they discovered the symptomatic patients.

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus, every single one testing positive, which led to one hospitalization and 10 deaths. By Oct. 19, 37 staff members tested positive.

Crystal wasn’t privy to all the details but upon a brief account said, “It sounds pretty egregious.” 

The facility’s administrator, Megan Mapes, received a notice of a 23-day involuntary termination of the Medicare provider agreement: “We have determined that Andbe Home, Inc. no longer meets the requirements for participation as a skilled nursing facility in the Medicare program under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act.”

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 

These failures, among others described in the report, ultimately exposed all 61 residents to the virus. 
(iStock)

The termination will go into effect Nov. 18, 2020.

CMS informed Mapes that the Medicare program won’t pay for covered services to patients admitted to the facility on or after Oct. 27, 2020. Medicare will cover patients admitted before that date for up to 30 days “to ensure residents are successfully relocated.”

The facility was

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health

Does Medicare cover leukemia care? Treatment, costs and options

There are benefits included in Medicare plans that can help with treatment costs relating to leukemia. Out-of-pocket expenses may apply, but there may be additional support available.

Medicare covers many of the costs of care relating to leukemia. As with other cancer, doctors customize treatment options for people based on their medical history and type of cancer.

In this article, we discuss the different treatments for leukemia, what Medicare covers, and other options that may be available.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

Original Medicare has two parts that each provide coverage for care received in different settings.

Medicare Part A

Medicare Part A is sometimes called hospital insurance and covers inpatient hospital stays, including cancer treatment a person receives while in the hospital.

Part A also pays for skilled nursing facilities, hospice, and home healthcare. Home healthcare can include:

  • physical therapy
  • speech and language therapy
  • occupational therapy
  • skilled nursing care

A person enrolled in an eligible clinical research study may also have some costs covered by Part A.

Medicare Part B

Medicare Part B is sometimes called medical insurance. This part of Medicare pays for medically necessary, cancer-related treatments and services a person may need outside the hospital.

This can include:

  • doctor visits
  • chemotherapy drugs administered intravenously in an outpatient clinic or doctor’s office
  • some oral chemotherapy
  • durable medical equipment (DME) like wheelchairs or walkers
  • mental health services
  • nutritional counseling
  • radiation treatment

In some instances, Medicare Part B will cover the cost of a second opinion for surgery. This happens if the surgery is not an emergency. They may cover a third opinion if the first and second opinions differ.

Medicare Part D

Medicare Part D, also known as a prescription drug plan (PDP), covers outpatient prescription drugs. Private insurance companies administer these plans.

Some chemotherapy drugs that are not covered by Part B, may be covered under a PDP, as well as prescribed pain relief and anti-emetics.

Surgical options

Surgery plays a limited role in treating leukemia since blood carries the disease throughout the body.

An individual may get a central venous catheter, which is a flexible tube that is inserted into a large vein, making it easier to administer chemotherapy. This is an inpatient surgical procedure that is covered by Part A.

A person may also have a biopsy of the lymph nodes or bone marrow that can help diagnose leukemia. The biopsy is an outpatient procedure and is covered by Part B.

The body has several

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health

Mutual of Omaha Medicare supplement plans: Medigap

Mutual of Omaha is one of the private insurance companies that administer Medicare supplement insurance plans. Also known as Medigap, these plans can help cover out-of-pocket expenses left by original Medicare.

Mutual of Omaha offers various Medigap plans in most states, so a person may pick the option that best suits their budget and priorities.

This article discusses Medigap plans in general and which plans Mutual of Omaha offers.

Then, it examines how the plans work with other Medicare programs, as well as their benefits, costs, and the best time to buy them.

Lastly, it lists other companies that sell Medigap.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

Original Medicare is comprised of Part A, inpatient hospital insurance, and Part B, outpatient medical insurance. While it covers a large part of healthcare costs, a person must pay deductibles, copays, coinsurance, and sometimes excess charges. Medigap plans help fill this coverage gap because they pay some or all of these expenses.

Medicare currently offers 10 different Medigap plans that vary in benefits. These include Plans A, B, C, D, F, G, K, L, M, and N.

Each Medigap plan offers standardized benefits. For example, Plan G in one state has the same benefits as Plan G in another state.

The only exceptions to this rule are Medigap policies in Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, as these are standardized in a different way.

Once a person buys a Medigap plan, the company guarantees they may renew it every year. In other words, if someone develops additional health problems later, the company selling their plan cannot cancel it.

Mutual of Omaha is a well-known insurance company, as it has existed since 1909. It sells an array of insurance policies, including Medigap.

Of the 10 different Medigap policies, Mutual of Omaha offers seven. These include plans A, C, D, F, G, M, and Plan N. The Plan F policy offered is high-deductible.

The company sells plans in most U.S. states, with plan options in each state ranging from four to seven. A person can use this online tool to check if plans are offered in their area.

Medigap only works with original Medicare. It does not work with Medicare Advantage, the alternative to original Medicare, which provides parts A and B benefits, and often more.

Also, Medigap plans do not work alongside Medicare Part D, which is prescription drug coverage. Medigap plans themselves do not provide coverage for medication.

A person with original Medicare who may

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health

When are Medicare secondary payers? Insurers, claims, rules, and more

Medicare beneficiaries do not have to rely exclusively on Medicare for their healthcare coverage. People can use other insurance plans to allow them access to more services and lower their healthcare spending.

If someone has two different forms of coverage, the primary payer covers most costs, and the secondary payer then steps in to cover some or all remaining expenses.

With Medicare, secondary payers contribute to copayments and coinsurance. Usually, Medicare is the primary payer, although sometimes it can act as the secondary payer.

This article looks at Medicare as a secondary payer and how it works with other insurers. It also discusses the benefits of having two insurers and who pays first. It then looks at how the claims process works with both primary and secondary payers.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

A person can choose to have more than one insurance plan to cover their healthcare costs and Medicare works with other insurance providers to give people comprehensive coverage.

Each insurance pays their share of the healthcare service or products that someone receives.

Medicare secondary payer (MSP) means that another insurer pays for healthcare services first, making them the primary payer.

The secondary payer covers some or all of the remaining costs that the primary payer leaves unpaid.

When someone has two insurers, they benefit from broader healthcare coverage. Each insurer could cover services that the other does not, such as dental care, eye examinations, or alternative health therapies.

As an example, a primary insurer may offer prescription drug coverage, meaning that a person with original Medicare would not need a separate Medicare Part D plan or a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug coverage. This could lower a person’s overall healthcare costs.

If someone needs to stay in a hospital or a nursing facility for a long time, they may find it beneficial to have two insurers. For example, an individual’s primary insurer would pay up to their limits, and Medicare Part A benefits would kick in much later, extending the coverage period.

Having two insurance plans could mean a person has two monthly premiums. For most Medicare beneficiaries, this means they have the standard Part B premium, plus the premium for the primary insurer.

Careful consideration of the overall costs could mean a person’s expenses increase or decrease with a secondary insurance plan, but since a secondary payer could cover most out-of-pocket expenses, a person may find they save money despite paying two premiums.

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health

Pacific Source: Medicare Advantage plans: Locations, plans, and costs

PacificSource Medicare was founded in Oregon in 1933 as a not-for-profit company, offers Medicare Advantage plans, and has more than 300,000 members throughout the Northwest.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), Medicare-approved insurance companies, such as PacificSource, provided Advantage plans to more than 24 million US citizens in 2020.

This article looks at the PacificSource Advantage plans and availability. It also looks at the coverage, benefits, and costs.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

PacificSource offers several Medicare Advantage plans, including Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), Health Maintenance Organization Point of Service (HMO-POS), and Preferred Provider Organization (PPO).

HMO plans

PacificSource HMO plans include Medicare Essentials 2 without Part D prescription drug coverage and MyCare Rx 40 including Part D.

When a person enrolls in an HMO plan, they agree to use the plan’s network of healthcare providers. They also choose a primary care doctor from within the network, who then coordinates health services and referrals to specialists.

If a person wants to use a healthcare provider from outside the network, they may have more costs, except in a medical emergency.

Medicare Essentials 2 (HMO) plan

This plan is available in certain counties in Oregon. In 2021, the monthly premium and the annual deductible are both zero, while the out-of-pocket maximum expense is $5,500. A person must use in-network providers.

My Care Rx 40 (HMO) plan

This plan is available in certain counties in Oregon.
The monthly premium in 2021 is zero. Out-of-pocket expenses in 2021 have an annual maximum of $4,950, and a person must use in-network providers.

HMO-POS plans

PacificSource HMO-POS plans include Medicare Essentials Choice Rx 14, and MyCare Choice Rx 24, both of which include prescription drugs (Part D) coverage.

With HMO-POS plans, people have the freedom to use healthcare services outside of their plan’s network. However, they must pay a higher copay or coinsurance to do so.

Medicare Essentials Choice Rx 14 plan (HMO-POS) plan

This plan is available in certain counties in Oregon.
In 2021, the monthly premium is $99.00 and the in-network out-of-pocket maximum is $5,500.

2021 MyCare Choice Rx 24 (HMO-POS) plan

This plan is available in certain counties in Idaho.
The monthly premium in 2021 is $35. Out-of-pocket expenses have an annual maximum of $5,500 in 2021 for in-network providers and no maximum for out-of-network services.

PPO plans

PacificSource PPO plans include Explorer 12 without the prescription drug (Part D) cover and Explorer Rx4, including Part D prescription drug coverage.

These

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health

Medicare and CPAP machines: Coverage, treatments, and costs

Medicare covers some durable medical equipment (DME), including a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, when a doctor prescribes it for home use. Medicare Advantage plans may also cover CPAP therapy.

Medicare typically covers CPAP therapy for people who have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea.

This article discusses the types of sleep apnea and some of the treatments for the condition. It also looks at Medicare coverage.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

Sleep apnea is a condition in which a person temporarily stops breathing while asleep. The pauses in breathing are usually at least 10 seconds long and may last for more than a minute, according to the American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA). These pauses may occur hundreds of times a night.

Types of sleep apnea

The three main types of sleep apnea are:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea: This condition happens when a person’s airway becomes blocked during sleep. It can occur if the soft tissue at the back of the throat collapses and creates a blockage.
  • Central sleep apnea: This condition happens when a person’s brain does not send the appropriate signal to the muscles that play a role in breathing.
  • Mixed sleep apnea: This condition is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type of sleep apnea.

Causes of sleep apnea

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the causes of obstructive sleep apnea include:

  • obesity
  • large tonsils
  • heart or kidney failure, which may cause fluid buildup in the neck
  • genetic syndromes that affect facial structure

A person with sleep apnea may not know that they have the condition. They might only become aware of it because a partner or family member notices that the person’s breathing is irregular while sleeping.

Sleep apnea typically prevents a person from having deep, restful sleep.

Symptoms of sleep apnea

According to the NHLBI, the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea may include:

  • excessive daytime sleepiness
  • loud snoring
  • gasping for air while asleep
  • morning headaches
  • trouble concentrating

Sleep apnea may also increase a person’s risk for certain conditions, including:

Read more about sleep apnea here.

The most common treatment for someone with moderate-to-severe sleep apnea is a breathing device, such as a CPAP machine. CPAP therapy delivers a flow of air through a mask to help keep the airway open while a person is asleep.

Other potential treatments for sleep apnea include:

  • Oral appliance therapy: A person wears a custom-fitted
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