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Medical groups clash over insurance coverage of herbal medicine


By Lee Hyo-jin

A pilot program rolled out by the government to include several types of herbal medicine in treatments covered by national health insurance was welcomed by practitioners of traditional Korean medicine. It, however, immediately provoked backlash from Western medical doctors.

As the government has plans to expand the coverage for more herbal medicine in the future following the progress of the trial program, the mixed reactions of the two medical groups may deepen into another dispute.

Under the pilot program, which started on Nov. 20, patients at traditional Korean medicine clinics who are prescribed treatments for menstrual pain, facial paralysis, or the aftereffects of cerebrovascular diseases, pay only half of the fee for the herbal medicine, as the rest is covered by state insurance.

The three-year test run is aimed at reducing the financial burden of patients and establishing a verified system to ensure the safety and effectiveness of herbal medicine, according to the Ministry of Health and Welfare.

Around 8,700 clinics providing traditional Korean medicine treatments across the country ― approximately 62 percent of the total ― have agreed to participate in the program.

Why Western medical doctors oppose

The announcement was immediately met with strong backlash from the Korea Medical Association (KMA), the largest Western medical doctors’ group in the country with more than 130,000 members. The association strongly condemned the government’s decision through a press release, calling it a “nationwide clinical trial using unverified medicine.”

They argued that easing public access to traditional Korean medicine and related herbal therapy will pose a risk to people’s health as they claim the safety of the treatments have not been adequately verified and there is no scientific evidence for their efficacy.

The association also pointed out that the program may lead to poor quality of herbal medicine, due to a shortage of certified herbal medication dispensaries and lenient control over them. While most small traditional Korean medicine clinics have own dispensaries, some large ones have outside dispensaries make the medicine.

“There are only five outside herbal medication dispensaries in the country certified by the government. This means that those five facilities will be preparing all the herbal medicines for over 8,700 clinics during the pilot program period,” KMA member Kim Gyo-woong said at a press conference, Nov. 23.

“The mass production system may lead to failure in quality control and safety issues, and considering the current lax control over dispensaries, the system may lead to illicit manufacturing of drugs,” he added.

In addition, the KMA stressed that the health authorities should focus more on the unresolved issues surrounding the side effects of traditional medicine.

More than half of medical disputes reported in relation to traditional medicine treatments were about herbal medicine, followed by Chuna manual therapy, acupuncture, and skin care, the association said, citing recent data from the Korea Consumer Agency.

“The government must immediately retract the policy which only puts public safety at risk, and launch a full investigation on all herbal dispensaries and prohibit the operation

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Alfardan Medical with Northwestern Medicine participates in WISH 2020 for first time

Alfardan Medical with Northwestern Medicine (AMNM) successfully participated, for the first time, in the biennial World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) 2020.
The ambitious and sophisticated newcomer in Qatar’s healthcare market, AMNM is an ambulatory care centre that provides high-quality and multidisciplinary medical care, combined with service excellence, a press statement noted.


The providers

Under the theme ‘One World Our Health’, this year’s WISH event, which was held on a virtual platform, featured world-renowned speakers who discussed, presented and explored global health challenges.
During the event, AMNM showcased its high-calibre physicians and recently launched medical specialties. The ambulatory care centre is currently welcoming patients looking to access world-class evidence-based medical services in internal medicine, gastroenterology, ENT, orthopaedics and rehabilitation, and diagnostic imaging and lab.
Highly credentialed allied health professionals specialised in exercise physiology, physiotherapy and clinical nutrition are also available. This further reinforces AMNM’s patient-centric approach to healthcare that is buttressed by collaborative multidisciplinary teamwork, the statement pointed out.
Other AMNM medical specialties that will be introduced in the near future include dermatology, ophthalmology, dental, plastic surgery, reproductive endocrinology/IVF, gynaecology and executive health.
Dr Jessica Adam, chief medical officer at AMNM, said: “With the launch of our new departments and the onboarding of world-renowned specialists at AMNM, we are looking forward to offering our patients exceptional medical services in Qatar. We welcome the community to explore AMNM’s state-of-the-art treatment facility to experience advanced patient-centric care, provided by a multinational medical team.”
AMNM’s participation at WISH 2020 highlighted how the ambulatory care centre integrates a patient-centric American healthcare model with Qatar’s luxury and hospitality to deliver world-class and advanced medical care, the statement explained.
Presenting a new healthcare concept in Qatar and the region, AMNM operates an American model in advanced medicine practices, backed by a patient-centric approach, transparency, world-class service and teamwork that excels in the services provided.
Dr Adam added, “AMNM is the result of a significant international collaboration between Alfardan Group and US-based Northwestern Medicine. The partnership leverages both organisations’ complementary strengths: Alfardan Group’s legacy and scale in offering hospitality and luxury experiences, and the longstanding history of leadership and innovation of Northwestern Medicine in the medical field. AMNM is more than just a continuation of the impressive growth momentum Qatar has seen in the past decades; it is a new experience for healthcare in the region.”
She continued, “We are delighted to have been part of WISH 2020 this year, to showcase our capabilities to the world and contribute to the conversation taking place on global health challenges.”
Benefiting from the interdisciplinary collaboration between the different departments at AMNM, patients will receive advanced medical care from outstanding doctors and friendly medical staff that will be using state-of-the-art, US Food and Drug Administration-approved medical equipment.
The equipment support the physicians in delivering the best care synonymous with the standards of healthcare in North America, offering the patient comfort and trust throughout an overall seamless journey across the facility, the statement added.
Spanning over six floors in the iconic

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Ra Medical Systems to Feature the Pharos Optimized Excimer Laser at the Virtual New Frontiers in Cosmetic Medicine & Medical Dermatology Symposium

CARLSBAD, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Ra Medical Systems, Inc. (NYSE: RMED), a medical device company focused on commercializing excimer laser systems to treat vascular and dermatological diseases, announces it will feature the Pharos excimer laser at the New Frontiers in Cosmetic Medicine & Medical Dermatology Symposium 2020 Virtual Meeting being held November 21, 2020.

“We are delighted to showcase our Pharos excimer laser at this conference,” said Will McGuire, Ra Medical Systems CEO. “Pharos provides topical treatment of common skin disorders including psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis and leukoderma and is a lower cost and safe alternative to immunosuppressive agents. During the pandemic, Pharos may play a particularly valuable role for patients who may be otherwise immunocompromised.”

About the New Frontiers in Cosmetic Medicine & Medical Dermatology Conference

New Frontiers in Cosmetic Medicine Symposium will deal with the latest developments in cosmetic dermatology, cosmetic medicine, and anti-aging medicine. It is designed for an audience of physicians, physician assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners who work under the direct supervision of dermatologists, facial plastic surgeons, oculoplastic surgeons, and plastic surgeons, and commonly assist with cosmetic surgery and medicine. More information is available at https://www.cosmeticfrontiers.com/.

About Ra Medical Systems

Ra Medical Systems commercializes excimer lasers and catheters for the treatment of vascular and dermatological diseases. In May 2017 the DABRA excimer laser system received FDA 510(k) clearance in the U.S. for crossing chronic total occlusions, or CTOs, in patients with symptomatic infrainguinal lower extremity vascular disease with an intended use for ablating a channel in occlusive peripheral vascular disease. The Pharos excimer laser system is FDA-cleared and is used as a tool in the treatment of psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis and leukoderma. DABRA and Pharos are both based on Ra Medical’s core excimer laser technology platform and deploy similar mechanisms of action. Ra Medical manufactures DABRA and Pharos excimer lasers and catheters in a 32,000-square-foot facility located in Carlsbad, Calif. The vertically integrated facility is ISO 13485 certified and is licensed by the State of California to manufacture sterile, single-use catheters in controlled environments.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements generally relate to future events or Ra Medical’s future financial or operating performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements because they contain words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “could,” “intends,” “target,” “projects,” “contemplates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these words or other similar terms or expressions that concern Ra Medical’s future expectations, strategy, plans or intentions. Forward-looking statements in this press release include, but are not limited to, statements regarding the timing and potential outcome of the DABRA atherectomy clinical study. Ra Medical’s expectations and beliefs regarding these matters may not materialize, and actual results in future periods are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or implied by such forward-looking statements. The potential risks and

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First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care | News Center

People are a composite of many interconnected identities, Lassiter said, and taking an “intersectional” point of view is helpful in assessing how diverse, equitable and inclusive a workplace is. As an example, Lassiter described a case study of a particular organization that touted the number of women and people of color in their workforce. 

 The “statistics sound great on the surface, but … when we look at the data from an intersectional perspective, we see that the women in the organization are mostly white women, and the largest group of men in their organization is white men,” Lassiter said. 

 “When organizations say, ‘We’ve increased our numbers of women,’ who are those women?” Lassiter said. Similarly, when groups claim, “’We’ve increased our numbers of people of color,’ who’s included in [their definition of] people of color?” These are the questions that the framework of intersectionality helps us address, Lassiter said.

Diversity, equity and inclusion in medical education

We have to be willing to employ the same kind of rigor we apply to studies of science and medicine to efforts designed to eliminate bias and racism and promote diversity and inclusion, several speakers said.

In 2017, a 10-month program called Leadership, Education and Advancing Diversity, or LEAD, was created to pair Stanford Medicine residents and fellows with mentors who are Stanford Medicine faculty or educational administrators. 

“I had no idea how impactful this work would be,” Carmin Powell, MD, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics, told attendees at the Diversity and Inclusion Forum on Oct. 9. Powell co-directs LEAD with Lahia Yemane, MD. 

Every month, LEAD’s participants take part in discussion-based lectures on various topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion. They also work with their mentors to develop a presentation to deliver at the annual Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

 In just four years, LEAD has tripled in size, growing from 30 scholars and mentors to more than 100, Powell said. Part of the program’s success is its engagement with medical residents and fellows early in their careers, making equity, diversity and inclusion a part of their training.

Knowledge is key

Educating yourself on the history of racism and how to foster diversity and inclusion is essential, said Marc Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and keynote speaker at this year’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

“If you get nothing else out of today’s talk, I would just implore you to read and to get educated,” Nivet said. 

“You can no longer be an effective leader, period — not just in academic medicine — but period, without being much more elevated in your ability to understand these issues,” he said. “And that comes from reading and learning.”

Learning, trying new things and sharing what does — and doesn’t— work is important for progress, Nivet explained. “I think we don’t share the results of failure, which is typical in academic medicine. We don’t get points for writing about failures or initiatives that didn’t work and why

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Treating Opioid Addiction in Primary Care Benefits Both Patients and Cash-Strapped Medical Practices

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Nov. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States. And while many physicians want to offer it, clinics are unsure how to offer buprenorphine therapy in a financially sustainable way. Cost and revenue analysis from a team of Harvard Medical School researchers finds that even cash-strapped primary practices in high-poverty rural and urban communities can offer financially sustainable buprenorphine-based opioid addiction treatment.

The team, led by Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, a Harvard primary care physician and epidemiologist and Jonathan E. Fried, MD, MPH, an internal medicine resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, interviewed practice managers and identified four common approaches to delivering buprenorphine-based treatment in primary care practices. The approaches differed based on who in the clinic delivered the majority of face-to-face care, the presence of nurse care managers, and whether care was delivered in traditional one-on-one or group settings.

The research team then used microsimulation modeling to identify the cost and financial benefit of delivering buprenorphine-based treatment in a variety of primary care settings, including Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), non-FQHCs in both rural and urban high poverty areas,, and practices outside of high poverty areas. They found that all four approaches to care produced positive net revenue after the first year in a variety of practice settings, and net revenues were consistently highest for rural practices.

Physician-led treatment and shared medical visits, both of which relied on nurse care managers, consistently produced the greatest net revenue gains, generating from $29,000 to $70,000 per full-time physician per year across the practice types.

Additionally, net revenues were positive for all primary care practices that had at least nine patients in buprenorphine treatment per provider at any given time and no-show rates less than 34 percent. The findings suggest that in the current fee-for-service–dominated environment, offering office-based therapy for opioid addiction with buprenorphine can be a financially sustainable choice for cash-strapped primary care practices, despite hurdles.

Financing Buprenorphine Treatment in Primary Care: A Microsimulation Model

Jonathan E. Fried, et al

Center for Primary Care, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

View original content to download multimedia: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/annals-of-family-medicine-treating-opioid-addiction-in-primary-care-benefits-both-patients-and-cash-strapped-medical-practices-301170615.html

SOURCE Annals of Family Medicine

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Editas Medicine Reports Inducement Grants to New Chief Medical Officer

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 10, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Editas Medicine, Inc. (Nasdaq: EDIT), a leading genome editing company, today announced the grant of inducement awards to the Company’s newly appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Lisa Michaels, M.D. In connection with Dr. Michaels’ appointment, the Editas Medicine Board of Directors approved a stock option grant and a restricted stock unit award to Dr. Michaels as inducements material to Dr. Michaels entering into employment with Editas Medicine in accordance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5635(c)(4).  The stock option provides for the purchase of up to 120,000 shares of Editas Medicine common stock at a price of $30.41 per share, the closing price per share of Editas Medicine common stock as reported by Nasdaq on the date of grant, and vests over four years, with 25 percent of the shares vesting on the first anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date, and the remainder vesting ratably at the end of each subsequent month thereafter, subject to Dr. Michaels’ continued service relationship with Editas Medicine through the applicable vesting dates. The restricted stock unit award is for 20,000 shares of Editas Medicine common stock and vests as to 25 percent of the shares on each one-year anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date until the fourth anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date, subject to Dr. Michaels’ continued service to Editas Medicine through the applicable vesting dates.

About Editas Medicine
As a leading genome editing company, Editas Medicine is focused on translating the power and potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 and CRISPR/Cas12a (also known as Cpf1) genome editing systems into a robust pipeline of treatments for people living with serious diseases around the world. Editas Medicine aims to discover, develop, manufacture, and commercialize transformative, durable, precision genomic medicines for a broad class of diseases. For the latest information and scientific presentations, please visit www.editasmedicine.com.

CONTACT: Contacts: Media Cristi Barnett (617) 401-0113 [email protected] Investors Mark Mullikin (617) 401-9083 [email protected]

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Limaca Medical Raises $1.25 Million to Enhance Precision Medicine Through Improved Biopsies

MISGAV, Israel, Nov. 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Limaca Medical, (“Limaca”) a portfolio company of The Trendlines Group Ltd. (SGX: 42T) (OTCQX: TRNLY), a leading Israel– and Singapore-based investment group focused on high-growth medical and agrifood technologies, announced it has closed $1.25 million of a  $1.5 million round to complete first-in-human (“FIH”) procedures, post-market clinical studies, and obtain regulatory approvals.

Iyad Khamaysi, MD, using Limaca’s Precision(TM) in first-in-human study at the advanced endoscopy unit of the gastroenterological department of RAMBAM Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel

Limaca has raised $1.25 million from Trendlines, Agriline (ultimately owned by a trust of which Vincent Tchenguiz is a discretionary beneficiary), Limaca Chairman and medical device industry veteran Carl Rickenbaugh, and a private investor.

The Precision™ biopsy device developed by Limaca deploys an automated revolving needle to acquire high-quality core tissue for histopathology and advanced genetic profiling. The Precision device makes it possible to acquire biopsy tissue samples at ten times greater procedural efficiency with less trauma than today’s endoscopic standard of care for greater diagnostic accuracy and patient-specific treatment to achieve better clinical outcomes.

Limaca’s CEO Assaf Klein commented, “We designed Precision to improve upon endoscopic biopsies and make a substantial leap forward in this critical diagnostic procedure to advance  precision treatment and achieve superior outcomes for cancer patients.”

To date, 10 patients have been enrolled in Limaca’s FIH study at the Rambam Health Care Campus in Israel. The FIH study compares Limaca’s Precision to standard of care EUS biopsy devices. Results have demonstrated excellent ease of use, safety, and improved sample capture. Iyad Khamaysi, MD, Director, Invasive Endoscopy Unit, Rambam Health Care, and one of Limaca’s founders, states, “Precision exceeded all clinical expectations for endoscopic biopsy while demonstrating clear safety in our cases.”

Limaca’s initial market is biopsy sampling for pancreatic cancer, an $850 million opportunity. Current methods used for sampling of this deadly cancer are outdated and provide poor tissue samples, frequently requiring a second biopsy procedure to acquire more tissue for diagnostic testing.  Additional markets for Precision, which are estimated at over $400 million, address biopsy sampling for the diagnosis of lung cancer, liver biopsy, lymphoma, and other cancers where endoscopic biopsy is feasible and subcutaneous tissue sampling is difficult.

Carl Rickenbaugh, Limaca’s Chairman, comments “The medical provider and payor markets respond to superior devices when they demonstrate strong clinical relevancy. We built Limaca to address the need for a more efficient endoscopic procedure for the provider, and for the cancer patient and payor, greater certainty to gain sufficient sample quality and quantity needed for pathology as well as more stringent genetic testing requirements.”

Contact information
Assaf Klein, CEO Limaca Medical
[email protected]
+972-54-229-9572

Cision View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/limaca-medical-raises-1-25-million-to-enhance-precision-medicine-through-improved-biopsies-301169885.html

SOURCE Limaca Medical

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Editas Medicine Appoints Lisa A. Michaels, M.D., as Chief Medical Officer

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Editas Medicine, Inc. (Nasdaq: EDIT), a leading genome editing company, today announced that it named Lisa A. Michaels, M.D., as the Company’s Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, effective immediately. Dr. Michaels will lead clinical research and drug development for the Company’s pipeline of experimental medicines.

“We are thrilled to have Lisa join our team, bringing her ability to translate concepts from ‘bench to bedside’, with proven results in design and execution of multinational clinical trials,” said Cynthia Collins, President and Chief Executive Officer, Editas Medicine. “Her corporate and academic drug development expertise will be instrumental in advancing our mission to develop and deliver transformative medicines to people living with serious diseases.”

Lisa Michaels, M.D., Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Editas Medicine, commented, “Editas Medicine is a leader in the development of the next generation of medicines to treat diseases with few approved medicines. I am excited to join the team as we just reacquired the rights to our ocular pipeline and are on the cusp of bringing EDIT-301, our potentially best-in-class medicine for the treatment of sickle cell disease, to the clinic. I look forward to working with the team to advance the development of EDIT-101, EDIT-301, and EDIT-201 in the near term as well as additional medicines in the future to treat serious diseases with unmet medical needs.”

Dr. Michaels has more than 25 years of experience in clinical research and drug development in both industry and academia. Dr. Michaels joins Editas Medicine from Bayer Pharmaceuticals where she spent more than 10 years in drug development, leading teams from early research and drug discovery through regulatory approval, commercial launch, and life cycle management. Most recently, she served as head of Bayer’s Rare Diseases, Cell & Gene Therapy therapeutic area.

Earlier in her career, Dr. Michaels spent more than 15 years at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Rutgers University in academic practice, working in areas including benign and malignant hematology, solid tumors, bone marrow failure syndromes, thrombosis and hemostasis, and immunologic disorders including cytopenias and immune deficiencies.

Dr. Michaels received her M.D. at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville during which she received additional training in translational research in autoimmune disease, immune deficiencies, and disorders of complement, at the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease in Washington, DC, and completed a preceptorship in pediatric cardiovascular care at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Michaels completed her residency and qualification in pediatrics at Duke University and post-graduate fellowship and qualification in hematology and oncology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

About Editas Medicine
As a leading genome editing company, Editas Medicine is focused on translating the power and potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 and CRISPR/Cpf1 (also known as Cas12a) genome editing systems into a robust pipeline of treatments for people living with serious diseases around the world. Editas Medicine aims to discover, develop, manufacture, and commercialize transformative, durable, precision genomic medicines for a broad class of

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Functional Medicine is Making Waves in the Medical Field – Press Release

Functional Medicine is Making Waves in the Medical Field

All medicine is created equal, correct? It may surprise patients to learn that not every treatment is right for every person. For decades, patients in Atlanta, GA, have relied on conventional medicine to diagnose and treat their ailments. However, it may not be the best choice for everyone. Here’s why functional medicine is becoming more popular for patients of all ages.

A Better Way to Treat Illness

When a patient visits a conventional doctor, they describe their symptoms and wait for a diagnosis. The doctor uses this information to develop a treatment plan. In most instances, these appointments only last a few minutes, and the doctor doesn’t push the patient for more information.

While it’s possible to correctly diagnose and treat a variety of illnesses in this manner, it’s not always the best option. Patients often fail to tell their physician about other factors that may play a role in their health, and some people only continue to get worse after diagnosis. Functional medicine bridges this gap.

What is functional medicine? It’s a comprehensive way to determine and treat the root cause of a patient’s illness. According to https://www.progressivemedicalcenter.com/functional-medicine/, functional medicine is a patient-focused approach. It goes beyond symptoms to create a personalized treatment plan.

How Functional Medicine Works

Functional medicine is a collaborative approach to health care. Instead of relying on a single physician for treatment, patients also receive advice from other medical professionals. According to https://www.progressivemedicalcenter.com/, naturopathic doctors and dietitians are some of the most common. Combining the knowledge of several medical experts provides patients with a more comprehensive diagnosis and more advanced treatment options.

For example, if a physician discovers a patient has high cholesterol after running a series of tests, they may prescribe a medication to lower it. However, without also addressing the patient’s lifestyle and dietary habits, the medicine will only mask the problem. Functional medicine lets doctors work together to find and treat the root cause of an illness or disorder.

Is Functional Medicine Right for Everyone? 

Patients often hit a brick wall when it comes to treating illnesses. Why aren’t they getting better? Are there other treatments out there? Since functional medicine looks past symptoms to figure out what’s really going on, patients can often reach their health goals faster than before.

Functional medicine isn’t a new approach to medicine; it’s just a better approach. Patients still have access to highly-skilled doctors, but they’ll also be able to meet with other medical experts to obtain different opinions. Appointments are more thorough, and doctors ask questions to learn as much about the patient as possible. Getting to know the entire person instead of just the symptoms makes this approach better for most people.

A Functional Approach to Better Health

Progressive Medical Center is an integrative medical center, providing functional medicine to patients since 1998. Using a whole-person approach, the doctors offer advanced diagnostics and comprehensive solutions to every patient. It’s their goal to help people regain their health through customized therapies and proven remedies.

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Medical Textiles Market New Opportunities | Demand for Non-woven Medical Textiles to Boost Market Growth

The medical textiles market is expected to grow by USD 2.99 billion during 2020-2024, expanding at a CAGR of over 5%. The report also throws light on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the market and the new opportunities and challenges market players can expect. The impact can be expected to be significant in the first quarter but gradually lessen in subsequent quarters – with a limited impact on the full-year economic growth. The report offers a detailed analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the market in optimistic, probable, and pessimistic forecast scenarios. – Download Free Sample Report on Pandemic Recovery Analysis

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201103005548/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Medical Textiles Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Medical Textiles Market: Demand for Non-woven Medical Textiles to drive growth

The growing demand for non-woven medical textiles for its use as absorbent pads, incontinence products, and apparel for patients and staff is driving the swift revenue growth in the global medical textile market. Non-woven materials are also finding considerable utilization in baby diapers, burn dressings, bed linen and blankets, disposable underwear, gowns, drug delivery devices, filter media, face masks, pillows, nasal strips, sponges, shoe covers, tissue scaffolds, sutures, towels, and wraps. Non-woven medical textiles are mainly produced using natural fibers such as wood pulp and cotton that offers biodegradable capabilities, absorbent benefits, and aesthetic characteristics. Synthetic fibers such as polypropylene, polyester, and low-cost bicomponent fibers are also used in preparing non-woven medical textiles which are generally used for availing benefits such as solvent resistance, product strength, and static dissipation during medical applications. Significant advantages of non-woven products in medical applications and a variety of product offerings have surged their adoption across the globe.

Is there any relief during this COVID pandemic? Click to know

As per Technavio, the demand for nanofibers in the medical industry will have a positive impact on the market and contribute to its growth significantly over the forecast period. This research report also analyzes other significant trends and market drivers that will influence market growth over 2020-2024.

Medical Textiles Market: Demand for Nanofibers in the Medical Industry

Nanofibers are finding wide applications across the medical industry as an essential class of one-dimensional nanomaterials. Nanofibers are manufactured using biodegradable or biocompatible materials that have unique properties and functionalities for use in biomedical and healthcare sectors. High surface area and porosity in Nanofibers enhance the adhesion of cells, proteins, and drug molecules. Nanofibers are finding increasing use in the medical industry in applications such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The growing use of nanofibers has resulted in their mass production. For instance, Asahi Kasei, a medical textile company based in Japan, has already made plans to mass-produce cellulose nanofiber (CNF) by the end of 2020. These factors will positively impact the market growth.

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