Media

dentist

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization and Share Moving Media Announce Joint Venture to Publish DSO-focused Dental Trade Magazine

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (DEO) is committed to providing emerging dental group leaders access to the connections, education, and resources they need to grow. So, The DEO is excited to announce its joint venture with Share Moving Media to form DEO Media, LLC, publisher of Efficiency In Group Practice Magazine, a resource for dentist entrepreneurs and DSO leaders.

PORTLAND, Ore. (PRWEB) December 03, 2020

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization (The DEO) of Portland, Oregon and Share Moving Media of Lawrenceville, Georgia announce the formation of a new entity called DEO Media, LLC, a joint venture between the two organizations to publish Efficiency in Group Practice, a bi-monthly dental trade magazine focused on DSOs (dental service organizations) and group dentistry.

“We’re extremely excited to give emerging dental group leaders even more access to the people, education, and resources they need to grow,” said Jacob Puhl, CEO of The DEO. “This partnership further enables us to continue our mission to help dentist entrepreneurs and their executives fulfill their visions. We hope to have a continued positive impact on the dental community.”

Efficiency In Group Practice provides an informational and educational link between manufacturers, distributors, service providers, and dental group practices. Each issue of Efficiency covers emerging trends in dentistry, and provides content to enable group practices to capitalize on their distinct strengths and differences to reach new heights of efficiency and become more profitable.

“This new partnership positions Efficiency in Group Practice with the leadership and direction so dearly needed for a publication to thrive in these dynamic times,” said Share Moving Media CEO John Pritchard. “Now more than ever, dental group practices need insight, understanding and community to grow their practices. We are excited to partner with Jacob Puhl and the entire DEO team to help provide just that!”

Under the partnership, The DEO and Share Moving Media will collaborate on editorial, sales, marketing and distribution of the industry-leading publication. Jacob Puhl, partner and CEO of the Dentist Entrepreneur Organization, will be Efficiency’s publisher.

The first issue from DEO Media, LLC will be the January-February 2021 edition of Efficiency In Group Practice.

About

The Dentist Entrepreneur Organization© (DEO) provides a context, a professional resource, and a peer-to-peer network within a well-managed organizational structure. For more information, visit https://deodentalgroup.com/.

Share Moving Media is a leading publishing and content company providing information, communication and educational services to providers, manufacturers and distributors involved in the business of healthcare. For more information, visit https://sharemovingmedia.com/.

For more information on Efficiency in Group Practice, visit https://www.dentalgrouppractice.com/.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_dentist_entrepreneur_organization_and_share_moving_media_announce_joint_venture_to_publish_dso_focused_dental_trade_magazine/prweb17583024.htm

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fitness

Business Insider’s top advertising and media stories for November 13

Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for November 13. I’m Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at [email protected]

First: We are looking for nominations for the top PR firms in the tech industry. Nominations are open until November 18.

Today’s news: L’Oréal’s US chief marketing officer Gretchen Saegh-Fleming leaves for at-home fitness startup Hydrow, inside WarnerMedia’s huge layoffs, and how Jennifer Prosek became a star in financial PR.


gretchen



L’Oreal


L’Oréal’s US CMO has jumped to at-home fitness startup Hydrow, which just raised $25 million as it aims to take on Peloton and Mirror

Read the full story here.


WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar

Jason Kilar.

WarnerMedia


Inside WarnerMedia as huge layoffs hit the company and speculation swirls around the futures of CNN and HBO Max

Read the full story here.


Jennifer Prosek, managing partner of Prosek Partners

Jennifer Prosek, managing partner of Prosek Partners, speaks at the Page Spring Seminar in 2015.

Page


Inside the rise of Jennifer Prosek, who went from upstart to financial public relations juggernaut who spins for clients like Goldman Sachs and Bridgewater Associates

Read the full story here.


More stories we’re reading:

 Thanks for reading and see you on Monday! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here.

— Lauren

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health

Fact check: No, the media didn’t suddenly change its reporting on coronavirus immunity after Trump got infected

The story goes like this: The media had always said that people who survived a Covid-19 infection would be immune from the virus for life. But once he, Trump, got infected and survived, the media started claiming immunity only lasted for months.

“And until I came along — you know, you used to hear you have immunity for life, right? As soon as I had it and got better, they were not too happy about that…It was supposed to be for life; when it was me, they said it’s only good for four months, okay? Okay. Anybody else it’s for life, with Trump they said it’s four months. So they brought it down now, immunity, from life to four months,” Trump said at his Tuesday rally in Lansing, Michigan.
Trump told a similar story at his Tuesday rally in Omaha, Nebraska: “But because it was me, the press said, ‘No, it’s not for a lifetime. It’s only for four months. The immunity is only now for four months.’ They brought it down, right? It was always gonna be for a lifetime, now it’s four months.”

Trump said much the same thing at a Wednesday rally in Bullhead City, Arizona, this time adding that “they’ve changed the whole medical standard” because of his own infection.

Facts First: Trump’s story is false. In the months before Trump tested positive for Covid-19 in early October, numerous major media outlets had reported that scientists were not yet sure how long survivors might have immunity. While we can’t definitively say there was no media report whatsoever from before Trump’s infection that had claimed survivors would get lifetime immunity, it was certainly not widely reported that survivors were immune for life.

A CNN fact check in July concluded: “It remains unclear if those already infected with the virus are immune to any reinfection. Additionally, it’s unknown how long any sort of immunity would last.” A CNN story in mid-August was headlined, “Are you immune to Covid-19 for three months after recovering? It’s not clear.” And CNN wrote in August about a Nevada man who was infected with the virus twice — quoting Mark Pandori, the director of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory, as saying: “After one recovers from COVID-19, we still do not know how much immunity is built up, how long it may last, or how well antibodies play a role in protection against a reinfection.”

Even upbeat media stories about optimistic findings about immunity noted that the facts had not been conclusively settled.

For example, an August article in the New York Times said that “scientists who have been monitoring immune responses to the coronavirus for months are now starting to see encouraging signs of strong, lasting immunity, even in people who developed only mild symptoms of Covid-19, a flurry of new studies has found.” But that piece continued by saying that “researchers cannot forecast how long these immune responses will last.”
The Washington Post also made clear in August that “researchers
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health

Media Multitasking Disrupts Memory, Even in Young Adults

The bulky, modern human brain evolved hundreds of thousands of years ago and, for the most part, has remained largely unchanged. That is, it is innately tuned to analog information—to focus on the hunt at hand or perhaps the forage for wild plants. Yet we now pummel our ancient thinking organ with a daily deluge of digital information that many scientists believe may have enduring and worrisome effects.

A new study published today in Nature supports the concern. The research suggests that “media multitasking”—or engaging with multiple forms of digital or screen-based media simultaneously, whether they are television, texting or Instagram—may impair attention in young adults, worsening their ability to later recall specific situations or experiences.

The authors of the new paper used electroencephalography—a technique that measures brain activity—and eye tracking to assess attention in 80 young adults between the ages of 18 and 26. The study participants were first presented with images of objects on a computer screen and asked to classify the pleasantness or size of each one. After a 10-minute break, the subjects were then shown additional objects and asked whether they were already classified or new. By analyzing these individuals’ brain and eye responses as they were tasked with remembering, the researchers could identify the number of lapses in their attention. These findings were then compared to the results of a questionnaire the participants were asked to fill out that quantified everyday attention, mind wandering and media multitasking.

Higher reported media multitasking correlated with a tendency toward attentional lapses and decreased pupil diameter, a known marker of reduced attention. And attention gaps just prior to remembering were linked with forgetting the earlier images and reduced brain-signal patterns known to be associated with episodic memory—the recall of particular events.

Previous work had shown a connection between media multitasking and poorer episodic memory. The new findings offer clues as to why this might be the case. “We found evidence that one’s ability to sustain attention helps to explain the relationship between heavier media multitasking and worse memory,” says the paper’s lead author Kevin Madore, a postdoctoral fellow in the department of psychology at Stanford University. “Individuals who are heavier media multitaskers may also show worse memory because they have lower sustained attention ability.”

“This is an impressive study,” comments Daphne Bavelier, a professor of psychology at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, who was not involved in the new research. “The work is important as it identifies a source of interindividual variability when one is cued to remember information”—the differences in attention among the study participants. “These findings are novel and tell us something important about the relationship between attention and memory, and their link to everyday behavior …, [something] we did not know before,” adds Harvard University psychologist Daniel L. Schacter, who was also not involved in the study.

Madore points out that the new findings are, for now, correlational. They do not indicate if media multitasking leads to impaired attention or if people with worse attention

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health

Trump claims the worsening U.S. coronavirus outbreak is a ‘Fake News Media Conspiracy’ even as hospitalizations rise

  • President Donald Trump claimed the worsening coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is a “Fake News Media Conspiracy,” saying the nation only has the most cases in the world because “we TEST, TEST, TEST.”
  • Trump has repeatedly downplayed the virus and has insisted that the U.S. has more cases than any other country because the nation tests more people.
  • Public health officials and infectious disease experts dispute that claim, saying the rate of tests that are positive and hospitalizations are on the rise in several states



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in Londonderry, New Hampshire on October 25, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in Londonderry, New Hampshire on October 25, 2020.

President Donald Trump on Monday claimed the worsening coronavirus outbreak in the United States is a “Fake News Media Conspiracy,” saying the nation only has the most cases in the world because “we TEST, TEST, TEST.”

“Corrupt Media conspiracy at all time high,” Trump said in a tweet Monday morning. “On November 4th., topic will totally change,” he added, referring to the day after the presidential election.

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Trump’s tweet came as the U.S. is reporting a record-breaking number of new coronavirus cases. On Sunday, the country has reported an average of about 68,767 new cases every day, the highest seven-day average recorded yet, according to a CNBC analysis of Hopkins data. The U.S. reported 60,789 new Covid cases Sunday after daily cases reached  83,757 on Friday, passing the last record of roughly 77,300 cases seen on July 16, according to Hopkins data.

Trump, who tested positive for the virus earlier this month, has repeatedly downplayed the virus and insisted that the U.S. has more cases than any other country because the nation tests more people. But public health officials and infectious disease experts dispute that claim, saying the rate of tests that are positive and hospitalizations are both on the rise in several states.



chart, histogram


© Provided by CNBC


The overall U.S. positivity rate, or the percentage of Covid-19 tests that come back positive, is at 6.2%, up from around 5.2% last week, according to Hopkins. Illinois, where businesses are bracing for new coronavirus restrictions amid a rise in new Covid cases, has a positivity rate of 6.3%. Wisconsin, which hit a record high in average daily cases Sunday, has a positivity rate of 16%. Kentucky, another state that hit a new high, has a positivity rate of 8.4%.

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Additionally, Covid-19 hospitalizations were growing by 5% or more in 34 states as of Sunday, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by the Covid Tracking Project. Fifteen states hit record highs in hospitalizations. El Paso County in Texas enacted a curfew after ICUs in the area reached full capacity. The increase in hospitalizations could

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