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WHO to set up centre for traditional medicine in India, PM Modi says matter of pride



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The World Health Organisation announced on Friday that it will set up a Global Centre for Traditional Medicine in India, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi expressing confidence that just like the country has emerged as the ‘pharmacy of the world’, the WHO institution will become the centre for global wellness.

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus made the announcement in a video message at an event in which Prime Minister Modi dedicated two future-ready Ayurveda institutions in Jaipur and Jamnagar to the nation via video conferencing on the occasion of the 5th Ayurveda Day.

The Institute of Teaching and Research in Ayurveda (ITRA), Jamnagar (Gujarat) and the National Institute of Ayurveda (NIA), Jaipur (Rajasthan) are both premier institutions of Ayurveda in the country.

The Jamnagar institute has been conferred the status of an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an act of Parliament and the one at Jaipur has been designated an Institution Deemed to be University (De novo Category) by the University Grants Commission (UGC), according to the AYUSH ministry.

In his video message, Ghebreyesus said, “I am pleased to announce that we have agreed to open a WHO Global Centre of Traditional Medicine in India to strengthen the evidence, research, training and awareness of traditional and complementary medicine.”

“This new centre will support WHO’s efforts to implement the WHO traditional medicine strategy 2014-2023 which aims to support countries in developing policies and action plans to strengthen the role of traditional medicine as part of their journey to universal health coverage and a healthier, fairer and safer world,” he said.

Traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurveda can play an important role in integrated people-centric health services and healthcare, but they have not received enough attention, the WHO DG said.

Ghebreyesus also lauded Prime Minister Modi for his commitment to the universal coverage under Ayushman Bharat and evidence-based promotion of traditional medicines to achieve health related objectives.

Modi said Ayurveda is India’s heritage whose expansion entails the welfare of humanity and all Indians will be happy to see that the country’s traditional knowledge is enriching other countries.

“It is a matter of pride for all Indians that the WHO has chosen India for establishing its Global Centre for Traditional Medicine. Now work will be done in this direction from India,” Modi said.

“I would like to thank the WHO and particularly its Director General Tedros for giving this responsibility to India. I am confident that just like India has emerged as the pharmacy of the world, in the same manner this centre for traditional medicine will become the centre for global wellness,” he said.

Stressing on bringing ayurveda knowledge out of books, scriptures and home remedies and developing this ancient knowledge as per modern needs, Modi said new research is being done in the country by combining information received from modern science of the 21st century with India’s ancient medical knowledge.

Noting that three years ago, the All India Ayurvedic Institute was established here,

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medicine

WHO to set up centre for traditional medicine in India; PM Modi calls it ‘matter of pride’- The New Indian Express

By PTI

NEW DELHI: The World Health Organisation announced on Friday that it will set up a Global Centre for Traditional Medicine in India, with Prime Minister Narendra expressing confidence that just like the country has emerged as the ‘pharmacy of the world’, the WHO institution will become the centre for global wellness.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus made the announcement in a video message at an event in which Prime Minister Modi dedicated two future-ready Ayurveda institutions in Jaipur and Jamnagar to the nation via video conferencing on the occasion of the 5th Ayurveda Day.

The Institute of Teaching and Research in Ayurveda (ITRA), Jamnagar (Gujarat) and the National Institute of Ayurveda (NIA), Jaipur (Rajasthan) are both premier institutions of Ayurveda in the country.

The Jamnagar institute has been conferred the status of an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an act of Parliament and the one at Jaipur has been designated an Institution Deemed to be University (De novo Category) by the University Grants Commission (UGC), according to the AYUSH ministry.

In his video message, Ghebreyesus said, “I am pleased to announce that we have agreed to open a WHO Global Centre of Traditional Medicine in India to strengthen the evidence, research, training and awareness of traditional and complementary medicine.

” “This new centre will support WHO’s efforts to implement the WHO traditional medicine strategy 2014-2023 which aims to support countries in developing policies and action plans to strengthen the role of traditional medicine as part of their journey to universal health coverage and a healthier, fairer and safer world,” he said.

Traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurveda can play an important role in integrated people-centric health services and healthcare, but they have not received enough attention, the WHO DG said.

Ghebreyesus also lauded Prime Minister Modi for his commitment to the universal coverage under Ayushman Bharat and evidence-based promotion of traditional medicines to achieve health related objectives.

Modi said Ayurveda is India’s heritage whose expansion entails the welfare of humanity and all Indians will be happy to see that the country’s traditional knowledge is enriching other countries.

“It is a matter of pride for all Indians that the WHO has chosen India for establishing its Global Centre for Traditional Medicine.

Now work will be done in this direction from India,” Modi said.

“I would like to thank the WHO and particularly its Director General Tedros for giving this responsibility to India.

I am confident that just like India has emerged as the pharmacy of the world, in the same manner this centre for traditional medicine will become the centre for global wellness,” he said.

Stressing on bringing ayurveda knowledge out of books, scriptures and home remedies and developing this ancient knowledge as per modern needs, Modi said new research is being done in the country by combining information received from modern science of the 21st century with India’s ancient medical knowledge.

Noting that three years ago, the All India Ayurvedic Institute was established here, he said

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medicine

WHO to set up centre for traditional medicine in India, PM says matter of pride

New Delhi, Nov 13 (PTI) The World Health Organisation announced on Friday that it will set up a Global Centre for Traditional Medicine in India, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi expressing confidence that just like the country has emerged as the ‘pharmacy of the world’, the WHO institution will become the centre for global wellness.

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus made the announcement in a video message at an event in which Prime Minister Modi dedicated two future-ready Ayurveda institutions in Jaipur and Jamnagar to the nation via video conferencing on the occasion of the 5th Ayurveda Day.

The Institute of Teaching and Research in Ayurveda (ITRA), Jamnagar (Gujarat) and the National Institute of Ayurveda (NIA), Jaipur (Rajasthan) are both premier institutions of Ayurveda in the country.

The Jamnagar institute has been conferred the status of an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an act of Parliament and the one at Jaipur has been designated an Institution Deemed to be University (De novo Category) by the University Grants Commission (UGC), according to the AYUSH ministry.

In his video message, Ghebreyesus said, ‘I am pleased to announce that we have agreed to open a WHO Global Centre of Traditional Medicine in India to strengthen the evidence, research, training and awareness of traditional and complementary medicine.’ ‘This new centre will support WHO’s efforts to implement the WHO traditional medicine strategy 2014-2023 which aims to support countries in developing policies and action plans to strengthen the role of traditional medicine as part of their journey to universal health coverage and a healthier, fairer and safer world,’ he said.

Traditional systems of medicine such as Ayurveda can play an important role in integrated people-centric health services and healthcare, but they have not received enough attention, the WHO DG said.

Ghebreyesus also lauded Prime Minister Modi for his commitment to the universal coverage under Ayushman Bharat and evidence-based promotion of traditional medicines to achieve health related objectives.

Modi said Ayurveda is India’s heritage whose expansion entails the welfare of humanity and all Indians will be happy to see that the country’s traditional knowledge is enriching other countries.

‘It is a matter of pride for all Indians that the WHO has chosen India for establishing its Global Centre for Traditional Medicine. Now work will be done in this direction from India,’ Modi said.

‘I would like to thank the WHO and particularly its Director General Tedros for giving this responsibility to India. I am confident that just like India has emerged as the pharmacy of the world, in the same manner this centre for traditional medicine will become the centre for global wellness,’ he said.

Stressing on bringing ayurveda knowledge out of books, scriptures and home remedies and developing this ancient knowledge as per modern needs, Modi said new research is being done in the country by combining information received from modern science of the 21st century with India’s ancient medical knowledge.

Noting that three years ago, the All India Ayurvedic Institute was established here,

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health

Mental Health Advocates Say These Things Need To Change No Matter Who Wins The Election

Looking beyond Tuesday’s elections, mental health advocates are gearing up to become a more potent political lobby, as the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic has caused a surge in people seeking services and flooded an already understaffed system. They are urging political leaders to increase funding and extend protections for mental healthcare regardless of who wins the presidency and the down-ballot races that will decide the makeup of Congress and statehouses around the country.

“We’re going to be seeing a tidal wave of people seeking out mental health support,” said Matthew Shapiro, associate director for public affairs at the National Alliance on Mental Illness in New York State, at a virtual policy panel in October. Many of the callers to a state-run support line during the pandemic have been “seeking out mental health services for the first time in their lives,” he said.

“That’s a very encouraging thing to hear the people are seeking help,” Shapiro said, adding that it’s “scary and really concerning” that there might not be enough help to go around.

Shapiro and other advocates are becoming more vocal about funding for mental health and issues that affect it, reflecting a desire to follow the example of activists who fought taboos against HIV and other conditions to win support in the halls of power.

The movement has a long way to go. Mental health and substance use have been virtually absent from the presidential debates. That lack of attention reflects mental health advocates’ lack of power, said Bill Smith, who this year founded Inseparable Action, a political group advocating for greater access to mental healthcare. “There are a lot of really, really smart people who know what we need to do and understand the policy solutions. They just don’t have the power to get it done,” said Smith, the former political director for a marriage equality group.

Inseparable Action aims to help build that political power. It helped pass California’s new law making it harder for insurers to deny mental healthcare and is at work on an agenda of reforms Congress can pass and ones the president can make without its approval. Those include more strongly enforcing the equality of mental and medical benefits and rolling out the new 9-8-8 emergency number for mental health crises. While Smith personally supports Joe Biden’s campaign and has raised money for it, a second Trump administration could also act on any of those proposals. “There are things that need to happen no matter who the president is,” Smith said.

Groups that support people with mental illness are raising their voices as well. Fountain House, a community center in New York for people with serious mental illness, helps its members build social, vocational, and educational skills by teaching them to run the center itself. It can also help members advocate for their political

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