Machines

fitness

25 Cyber Monday Exercise Equipment Deals 2020: Weights, Bikes, Rowing Machines, More

We are roughly one month out from finishing this dumpster fire of a year, with one last big sale, which is today only: Cyber Monday (November 30). There’s been a flurry of sales all November leading up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but that hasn’t deterred major brands and retailers like Amazon, Walmart, and Theragun from slashing their prices for this shopping holiday. If you’re working from home, you likely don’t have all the time in the world to set alerts on who has the best deal on what. Chances are that you’re also working out from home, as gyms aren’t your best bet during a pandemic as they involve you staying indoors with a bunch of breathing people. And if you were relying on outdoor workouts, temperatures are dropping, forcing you inside. 

Which leaves you one last option, which is to beef up your at-home gym setup. If you’ve had your eye on a folding treadmill, stationary bike, rowing machine, weights, a new yoga mat, and/or on-demand exercise subscriptions, make moves ASAP to snatch up these last-chance Cyber savings so that you can make moves inside your own house. If you’re not adding to your cart now for your wallet, then at least do it for your health.


Retail giant Amazon, as expected, has some killer deals on all the at-home fitness equipment you could want to round out your home gym: Foldable treadmills, cycling machines, adjustable dumbbells, and more.

product image

Sunny Health & Fitness Folding Treadmill

This compact folding treadmill is Amazon’s number one bestseller, with some intrepid shoppers noting that it’s even possible to use as a walking desk if you afix a shelf to the top of it. It has three levels of manual inclines and includes nine built-in workout programs. 

Image may contain: Binoculars

ATIVAFIT Adjustable Dumbbell for Workout Strength Training

Walmart is offering up to 40% off its fitness gear, from basics like step decks and pull-up bars, to serious equipment such as cycles and treadmills. 

product image

Costway 800W Portable Folding Electric Motorized Treadmill

Safety is key when it comes to this motorized machine, which features a Safety Key connect system and emergency stop button for added protection. The small but sturdy steel frame also comes equipped with a multifunction LED screen, handrails, and a holder for securely stashing your smartphone or iPad.

product image

Echelon Connect Sport Indoor Cycling Exercise Bike

Therabody’s self-massage devices are popular in the fitness community for their quickfire ability to massage sore, strained muscles. It’s kind of like a foam roller, but with a more powerful impact. The brand rarely has sales, and this one’s about to run out, so get to it. 

product image

Theragun Elite

This handheld percussive therapy device uses amplitude (depth), frequency (speed), and torque (force) to reach deep into your muscles to increase blood flow and decrease soreness and stiffness. It helped me move better after tough workouts, and also released tension in my shoulders after leaning over a laptop all day.

product image

Theragun Prime

This ergonomic percussive device boasts a 120-minute battery

Read More
medicine

Researchers engineer tiny machines that deliver medicine efficiently

Johns Hopkins Researchers engineer tiny machines that deliver medicine efficiently
A theragripper is about the size of a speck of dust. This swab contains dozens of the tiny devices. Credit: Johns Hopkins University.

Inspired by a parasitic worm that digs its sharp teeth into its host’s intestines, Johns Hopkins researchers have designed tiny, star-shaped microdevices that can latch onto intestinal mucosa and release drugs into the body.

David Gracias, Ph.D., a professor in the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering, and Johns Hopkins gastroenterologist Florin M. Selaru, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, led a team of researchers and biomedical engineers that designed and tested shape-changing microdevices that mimic the way the parasitic hookworm affixes itself to an organism’s intestines.

Made of metal and thin, shape-changing film and coated in a heat-sensitive paraffin wax, “theragrippers,” each roughly the size of a dust speck, potentially can carry any drug and release it gradually into the body.

The team published results of an animal study this week as the cover article in the journal Science Advances.

Gradual or extended release of a drug is a long-sought goal in medicine. Selaru explains that a problem with extended-release drugs is they often make their way entirely through the gastrointestinal tract before they’ve finished dispensing their medication.

“Normal constriction and relaxation of GI tract muscles make it impossible for extended-release drugs to stay in the intestine long enough for the patient to receive the full dose,” says Selaru, who has collaborated with Gracias for more than 10 years. “We’ve been working to solve this problem by designing these small drug carriers that can autonomously latch onto the intestinal mucosa and keep the drug load inside the GI tract for a desired duration of time.”

Researchers engineer tiny machines that deliver medicine efficiently
When an open theragripper, left, is exposed to internal body temperatures, it closes on the instestinal wall. In the gripper’s center is a space for a small dose of a drug. Credit: Johns Hopkins University

Thousands of theragrippers can be deployed in the GI tract. When the paraffin wax coating on the grippers reaches the temperature inside the body, the devices close autonomously and clamp onto the colonic wall. The closing action causes the tiny, six-pointed devices to dig into the mucosa and remain attached to the colon, where they are retained and release their medicine payloads gradually into the body. Eventually, the theragrippers lose their hold on the tissue and are cleared from the intestine via normal gastrointestinal muscular function.

Gracias notes advances in the field of biomedical engineering in recent years.

“We have seen the introduction of dynamic, microfabricated smart devices that can be controlled by electrical or chemical signals,” he says. “But these grippers are so small that batteries, antennas and other components will not fit on them.”

Theragrippers, says Gracias, don’t rely on electricity, wireless signals or external controls. “Instead, they operate like small, compressed springs with a temperature-triggered coating on the devices that releases the stored energy autonomously at body temperature.”

The Johns Hopkins researchers fabricated the devices with about

Read More
medicine

Researchers engineer tiny machines that deliver medicine efficiently — ScienceDaily

Inspired by a parasitic worm that digs its sharp teeth into its host’s intestines, Johns Hopkins researchers have designed tiny, star-shaped microdevices that can latch onto intestinal mucosa and release drugs into the body.

David Gracias, Ph.D., a professor in the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering, and Johns Hopkins gastroenterologist Florin M. Selaru, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, led a team of researchers and biomedical engineers that designed and tested shape-changing microdevices that mimic the way the parasitic hookworm affixes itself to an organism’s intestines.

Made of metal and thin, shape-changing film and coated in a heat-sensitive paraffin wax, “theragrippers,” each roughly the size of a dust speck, potentially can carry any drug and release it gradually into the body.

The team published results of an animal study this week as the cover article in the journal Science Advances.

Gradual or extended release of a drug is a long-sought goal in medicine. Selaru explains that a problem with extended-release drugs is they often make their way entirely through the gastrointestinal tract before they’ve finished dispensing their medication.

“Normal constriction and relaxation of GI tract muscles make it impossible for extended-release drugs to stay in the intestine long enough for the patient to receive the full dose,” says Selaru, who has collaborated with Gracias for more than 10 years. “We’ve been working to solve this problem by designing these small drug carriers that can autonomously latch onto the intestinal mucosa and keep the drug load inside the GI tract for a desired duration of time.”

Thousands of theragrippers can be deployed in the GI tract. When the paraffin wax coating on the grippers reaches the temperature inside the body, the devices close autonomously and clamp onto the colonic wall. The closing action causes the tiny, six-pointed devices to dig into the mucosa and remain attached to the colon, where they are retained and release their medicine payloads gradually into the body. Eventually, the theragrippers lose their hold on the tissue and are cleared from the intestine via normal gastrointestinal muscular function.

Gracias notes advances in the field of biomedical engineering in recent years.

“We have seen the introduction of dynamic, microfabricated smart devices that can be controlled by electrical or chemical signals,” he says. “But these grippers are so small that batteries, antennas and other components will not fit on them.”

Theragrippers, says Gracias, don’t rely on electricity, wireless signals or external controls. “Instead, they operate like small, compressed springs with a temperature-triggered coating on the devices that releases the stored energy autonomously at body temperature.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Johns Hopkins Researchers engineer tiny machines that deliver medicine efficiently

IMAGE

IMAGE: When an open theragripper, left, is exposed to internal body temperatures, it closes on the instestinal wall. In the gripper’s center is a space for a small dose of a…
view more 

Credit: Johns Hopkins University

Inspired by a parasitic worm that digs its sharp teeth into its host’s intestines, Johns Hopkins researchers have designed tiny, star-shaped microdevices that can latch onto intestinal mucosa and release drugs into the body.

David Gracias, Ph.D., a professor in the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering, and Johns Hopkins gastroenterologist Florin M. Selaru, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, led a team of researchers and biomedical engineers that designed and tested shape-changing microdevices that mimic the way the parasitic hookworm affixes itself to an organism’s intestines.

Made of metal and thin, shape-changing film and coated in a heat-sensitive paraffin wax, “theragrippers,” each roughly the size of a dust speck, potentially can carry any drug and release it gradually into the body.

The team published results of an animal study this week as the cover article in the journal Science Advances.

Gradual or extended release of a drug is a long-sought goal in medicine. Selaru explains that a problem with extended-release drugs is they often make their way entirely through the gastrointestinal tract before they’ve finished dispensing their medication.

“Normal constriction and relaxation of GI tract muscles make it impossible for extended-release drugs to stay in the intestine long enough for the patient to receive the full dose,” says Selaru, who has collaborated with Gracias for more than 10 years. “We’ve been working to solve this problem by designing these small drug carriers that can autonomously latch onto the intestinal mucosa and keep the drug load inside the GI tract for a desired duration of time.”

Thousands of theragrippers can be deployed in the GI tract. When the paraffin wax coating on the grippers reaches the temperature inside the body, the devices close autonomously and clamp onto the colonic wall. The closing action causes the tiny, six-pointed devices to dig into the mucosa and remain attached to the colon, where they are retained and release their medicine payloads gradually into the body. Eventually, the theragrippers lose their hold on the tissue and are cleared from the intestine via normal gastrointestinal muscular function.

Gracias notes advances in the field of biomedical engineering in recent years.

“We have seen the introduction of dynamic, microfabricated smart devices that can be controlled by electrical or chemical signals,” he says. “But these grippers are so small that batteries, antennas and other components will not fit on them.”

Theragrippers, says Gracias, don’t rely on electricity, wireless signals or external controls. “Instead, they operate like small, compressed springs with a temperature-triggered coating on the devices that releases the stored energy autonomously at body temperature.”

###

The Johns Hopkins researchers fabricated the devices with about 6,000 theragrippers per 3-inch silicon wafer. In their animal experiments, they loaded a pain-relieving drug onto the grippers. The researchers’

Read More
health

Medicare and CPAP machines: Coverage, treatments, and costs

Medicare covers some durable medical equipment (DME), including a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, when a doctor prescribes it for home use. Medicare Advantage plans may also cover CPAP therapy.

Medicare typically covers CPAP therapy for people who have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea.

This article discusses the types of sleep apnea and some of the treatments for the condition. It also looks at Medicare coverage.

We may use a few terms in this piece that can be helpful to understand when selecting the best insurance plan:

  • Deductible: This is an annual amount that a person must spend out of pocket within a certain time period before an insurer starts to fund their treatments.
  • Coinsurance: This is a percentage of a treatment cost that a person will need to self-fund. For Medicare Part B, this comes to 20%.
  • Copayment: This is a fixed dollar amount that an insured person pays when receiving certain treatments. For Medicare, this usually applies to prescription drugs.

Sleep apnea is a condition in which a person temporarily stops breathing while asleep. The pauses in breathing are usually at least 10 seconds long and may last for more than a minute, according to the American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA). These pauses may occur hundreds of times a night.

Types of sleep apnea

The three main types of sleep apnea are:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea: This condition happens when a person’s airway becomes blocked during sleep. It can occur if the soft tissue at the back of the throat collapses and creates a blockage.
  • Central sleep apnea: This condition happens when a person’s brain does not send the appropriate signal to the muscles that play a role in breathing.
  • Mixed sleep apnea: This condition is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type of sleep apnea.

Causes of sleep apnea

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the causes of obstructive sleep apnea include:

  • obesity
  • large tonsils
  • heart or kidney failure, which may cause fluid buildup in the neck
  • genetic syndromes that affect facial structure

A person with sleep apnea may not know that they have the condition. They might only become aware of it because a partner or family member notices that the person’s breathing is irregular while sleeping.

Sleep apnea typically prevents a person from having deep, restful sleep.

Symptoms of sleep apnea

According to the NHLBI, the signs and symptoms of sleep apnea may include:

  • excessive daytime sleepiness
  • loud snoring
  • gasping for air while asleep
  • morning headaches
  • trouble concentrating

Sleep apnea may also increase a person’s risk for certain conditions, including:

Read more about sleep apnea here.

The most common treatment for someone with moderate-to-severe sleep apnea is a breathing device, such as a CPAP machine. CPAP therapy delivers a flow of air through a mask to help keep the airway open while a person is asleep.

Other potential treatments for sleep apnea include:

  • Oral appliance therapy: A person wears a custom-fitted
Read More
fitness

Invest in Your Health With These 5 Bestselling Home Fitness Machines

We love these products, and we hope you do too. E! has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not E!.



a woman standing in a room: E! Illustration


© Provided by E!
E! Illustration

As we’ve all been learning to navigate the new normal of 2020, many of us have embraced a home workout routine. But if you’ve been hitting a plateau, it might be time for an upgrade with one of these must-have home fitness machines!

And they’re bestsellers for a reason. Whether you like to bike or run, or you prefer resistance training, there’s an option that’s perfect for you. Bowflex’s bike lets you mimic the feeling of an outdoor ride from the comfort of your own home, while NordicTrack has a treadmill that lets you program your run using Google Maps, so you can feel like you’re running trails in Ireland even though you’re in a studio in the Midwest. And if you can’t decide? The Mirror has a ton of classes to choose from, spanning yoga to boxing.

It’s time to get your sweat on with one of these fab fitness machines. Shop our picks below!

The 11 Best Leggings That Aren’t Black



a woman jumping in the air


© Provided by E!


Shop Now: The Mirror



a woman riding on the back of a bicycle


© Provided by E!


Shop Now: Bowflex VeloCore Bike





© Provided by E!


Shop Now: Sunny Health & Fitness Magnetic Rowing Machine





© Provided by E!


Shop Now: NordicTrack Commercial 1750 iFit Treadmill





© Provided by E!


Shop Now: Bowflex Xtreme 2 SE Home Gym

Want to treat yourself for hitting one of your workout goals? Pick up a pair (or three) of these boots and booties for less than $100 a pop! And if you’d like deals delivered directly to your in-box, sign up for the Shop With E! Newsletter!

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read More