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fitness

Amazon Black Friday Fitbit Charge 4 deal takes fitness tracker to its lowest EVER price BY FAR!

Fitbit Charge 4 Special Edition is the best fitness tracker this market-leading brand makes. It’s always good value at under £130/$150, but this deal takes it down to a crazy low price. It’s unlikely it will get much cheaper than that, even when the best Black Friday deals are unveiled at the end of November.

• Buy Fitbit Charge at Amazon.com for just $99.99 – was $149.99 so you save a massive $50!

In the UK? Don’t feel too left out. 

• Buy Fitbit Charge 4 for £119.99 (£10 off RRP).

Okay so that ain’t so great. 

The American deal is absolutely exceptional, however. It’s not just the cheapest this GPS-enabled fitness band with enhanced heart-rate tracking, VO2 Max estimates, super-advanced sleep tracking has ever been. It is the cheapest it has ever been by a HUGE distance.

Dive in now America, this deal will end in 5, 4, 3, 2… 

Charge 4 deal in the USA

Today’s best Fitbit Charge 4 deals

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness and…

Fitbit – Charge 4 Activity…

Fitbit Charge 4 – black -…

Charge 4 deal in the UK

Today’s best Fitbit Charge 4 deals

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness and…

Fitbit – Charge 4 Activity…

Fitbit Charge 4 – black -…

Why should you buy the Fitbit Charge 4 

Fitbit Charge 4

(Image credit: Fitbit)

Unlike its predecessor, Fitbit Charge 4 comes with built-in GPS so you can track your activities more precisely without needing to have your phone on you all the time. Should you want to have your phone on you, you can also use the Fitbit Charge 4 to control Spotify from your wrist.

The improved Active Zone Minutes system tracks your overall activity levels. This means it scores you higher for intense exercise than for going for a quick 200 steps around the neighborhood. This can give you a much better understanding of just how ‘active’ you were during the day/week and prioritises exercise that really elevates your heart rate. 

Less strenuous activities are also tracked of course if you’re more focussed on doing your 10,000 steps per day.

The Fitbit Charge 4 has a battery life of ‘up to’ 7 days – dependent on GPS usage – and you can pay in shops with it thanks to the Fitbit Pay feature. This water resistant fitness tracker monitors your heart rate 24/7, counts calorie burned, and has 15+ pre-loaded exercise profiles. You can track your goals all day, then have it monitor and rate your sleep at night.

It also utilises the excellent Fitbit App, where you can further scrutinise your fitness

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fitness

This Black Friday Fitbit Charge 4 deal at Amazon takes fitness tracker to its lowest ever price

Fitbit Charge 4 Special Edition is the best fitness tracker this market-leading brand makes. It’s always good value at under £150, but this deal takes it down to just £130 for one day only. It’s unlikely it will get much cheaper than that, even when the best Black Friday deals are unveiled at the end of November.

• Buy Fitbit Charge 4 Special Edition at Amazon, on sale for £129.99 – was £149.99, so you save £20 at Amazon

The Charge 4 Special Edition is functionally identical to the excellent Charge 4 but has a more premium finish. If you want a standard Charge 4, that is also discounted today and can be bought for £119.99 (£10 off RRP).

Fitbit Charge 4 Special Edition £129.99 | Was £149.99 | Save £20 at Amazon
The Fitbit Charge 4 Special Edition has all the features of the standard edition, but is made from more premium materials and boasts a nicer strap. It tracks heart rate 24/7, estimates your calories burned and monitors sleep. Unlike most older, lesser Fitbits it has GPS built in to track runs, hikes and bike rides, plus a blood oxygen sensor to track… blood oxygen. Deal ends today.View Deal

Today’s best Fitbit Charge 4 deals

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness and…

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness and…

Fitbit Charge 4 Fitness…

Fitbit Charge 4 Granite…

Why should you buy the Fitbit Charge 4 

Unlike its predecessor, the Fitbit Charge 4 comes with built-in GPS so you can track your activities more precisely without needing to have your phone on you all the time. Should you want to have your phone on you, you can also use the Fitbit Charge 4 to control Spotify from your wrist.

The improved Active Zone Minutes system tracks your activity levels even when you are not using a sport mode on the fitness tracker. This can give you a better understanding of just how ‘active’ you were during the day/week and prioritises exercise that really elevates your heart rate. Less strenuous activities are also tracked of course if you’re more focussed on doing your 10,000 steps per day.

The Fitbit Charge 4 has a battery life of ‘up to’ 7 days – dependent on GPS usage – and you can pay in shops with it thanks to the Fitbit Pay feature. This water resistant fitness tracker monitors your heart rate 24/7, counts calorie burned, and has 15+ pre-loaded exercise profiles. You can track your goals all day, then have it monitor and rate your sleep at night.

It also utilises the excellent Fitbit App, where you can further scrutinise your fitness and weight loss progress using easy-to-understand charts and graphs. Smartwatch-style notifications are also included.

Yet more Fitbit deals

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health

India has lowest daily virus deaths in 3 months

NEW DELHI — India has reported 579 fatalities from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the lowest increase in three months, driving its death toll to 114,610.

The Health Ministry on Monday also reported 55,722 new cases of coronavirus infection, raising India’s total to more than 7.5 million, second in the world behind the U.S.

A government-appointed committee of scientists said Sunday the epidemic may have peaked in India and the disease was likely to “run its course” by February 2021 if people used masks and adhered to physical distancing measures.

The number of new infections confirmed each day has declined for a month. The committee said even if active cases increased during the upcoming festive season and cold weather, they were unlikely to surpass India’s record daily high of 97,894 cases.

___


HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Congress is past the point it can deliver more coronavirus relief before the election, with Washington’s differences proving insurmountable

— China’s economy accelerates as virus recover gains strength

— US can now screen millions daily with growing supply of rapid tests, but challenge will be keeping track of the results

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea on Monday began testing tens of thousands of employees of hospitals and nursing homes to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks at live-in facilities.

Fifteen of the 76 latest cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency were from Busan, where more than 70 infections have been linked to a hospital for the elderly. The disease caused by the coronavirus can be more serious in older people.

Health workers have been scrambling to track infections in the Seoul metropolitan area, home to about half of the country’s 51 million people, as the virus spreads in a variety of places, including hospitals, churches, schools and workplaces.

From Monday, they will start a process to test 130,000 workers at hospitals, nursing homes and senior centers in the greater capital area. Officials will also test 30,000 patients who have visited and used these facilities, but will leave out hospitalized patients, who already receive tests when they are admitted.

Officials plan to complete the tests within October and could possibly expand the screening to other regions if needed.

Source Article

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health

Colorado Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

Colorado is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At No. 45 in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 10.9 percent of Colorado children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

Don’t miss the latest coronavirus updates from health and government officials in Colorado. Sign up for free Patch news alerts and newsletters for what you need to know daily.

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Colorado rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 8.1 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 10.3 percent, or 43 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 23.8 percent, or 49 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 7 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 25.8 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also

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health

Arizona Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

ARIZONA — Arizona is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At 38th in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 12.1 percent of Arizona children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Arizona rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 12.1 percent, or 41 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 13.3 percent, or 35 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 31.4 percent, or 31 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 10.9 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 32.5 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths in households making less than the federal poverty level were considered obese, more than double the 8.8 percent

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