Louisiana

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Louisiana coronavirus: 1,150 new cases, 17 more deaths reported Tuesday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 1,150 more coronavirus cases and 17 more deaths in its noon update Tuesday.

The number of hospitalizations increased by 21, and the number of patients in need of ventilators increased by 14.

These are another few key statewide statistics as of Tuesday:

— Total cases: 184,769

— Total deaths: 5,737

— Currently hospitalized: 619

— Currently on ventilators: 84

— Presumed recovered: 168,634 as of Oct. 26 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 4,379 as of Oct. 28 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

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50,000 children in Louisiana are without health insurance, the largest increase in a decade | Health care/Hospitals

Roughly 11,000 children in Louisiana lost their health insurance last year, the largest single-year drop in over a decade and an alarming reversal of years of progress getting kids covered.

About 50,000 children, or 4.4% of children in Louisiana, were uninsured in the state in 2019, according to an analysis of U.S. Census data by the Louisiana Budget Project, compared to 39,000 children who lacked health insurance in 2018. In 2016, the number of uninsured children was even lower, at 36,000.

The data in Louisiana mirror a nationwide trend that experts fear will worsen amid job losses and an unstable economy due to the coronavirus.



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22 of Louisiana’s 64 parishes have no hospital offering obstetric care, birth center, OB/GYN or certified nurse-midwives 

“This reflected 2019, which was a year in which we had record low unemployment and a decade of strong economic growth,” said Stacey Roussel, policy director for the Louisiana Budget Project and author of the report. “Still, we were seeing the uninsured rate for children rising across the country as well as here in Louisiana.”

“It also means a record increase in the number of families without insurance for their children as we were going into the largest public health emergency we’ve seen in our generation,” she added.

Access to health care is critical for young brains and bodies, according to researchers and medical experts.

In the first few years of life, over 80% of brain development takes place and the foundation is laid for growth of major body systems.

Interventions are most effective when doctors can spot conditions at a young age before they become a bigger issue.

“Preventative care is the hallmark of pediatric care,” said Dr. Ryan Pasternak, an adolescent medicine specialist and associate professor at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine. “Our goal is not only to identify and treat acute and chronic illnesses, but also to address and identify lifelong illnesses.”

Even short gaps in care can allow things to slip through. Pasternak said he saw a young patient this month who lost Medicaid and put off care for seven months. When the patient regained coverage, it was a two and a half hour visit.

“There were just a plethora of issues that had not been addressed,” Pasternak said.

Boy born 22 weeks into mother’s pregnancy

It’s not yet clear exactly why Louisiana’s number of uninsured children has grown so much in a year.

In 2016, Louisiana expanded Medicaid to include those making up to 138% of the federal poverty level, or about $36,000 for a family of four as of 2020. By April 2019, the expansion provided coverage to more than 500,000 additional people.

But in May of last year, Medicaid enrollment dipped after wage checks that automatically kicked off people appearing to make too much money to qualify, dropping by about 50,000 enrollees by the of 2019. But in January, enrollment started to climb again, with 550,000 people covered by the expansion as of Sept. 2020. 

Providers searching

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Louisiana coronavirus: 696 cases, 21 more deaths reported Friday; see latest data | Coronavirus

The Louisiana Department of Health reported 696 more coronavirus cases and 21 more deaths in its noon update Friday.

The number of hospitalizations increased by 22, and the number of patients in need of ventilators increased by one.

Here are a few key statewide statistics as of Friday:

— Total cases: 178,870

— Total deaths: 5,614

— Currently hospitalized: 620

— Currently on ventilators: 65

— Presumed recovered: 165,282 as of Oct. 19 (updated weekly)

— Probable cases: 3,733 as of Oct. 21 (updated weekly)

Note: The Advocate and The Times-Picayune staff calculates daily case count increases based on the difference between today’s total and yesterday’s total of confirmed coronavirus cases. The Louisiana Department of Health releases a daily case count on Twitter based on the deletion of duplicate cases. That case count can be different than the one listed here.

You can view more graphs and charts breaking down the data by clicking here.

Louisiana began reopening for Phase 1 on May 15-16 then moved to Phase 2 on June 5. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards extended Louisiana’s Phase 2 restrictions twice in August before moving the state to Phase 3 on Sept. 11.

This is a developing story. More details and analysis to come.

Source Article

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health

Jeff Asher: Amid national resurgence of coronavirus, Louisiana can be proud of ‘fragile’ progress | Coronavirus

In my last column, I made what I might call the “cautiously pessimistic” forecast for COVID-19 in Louisiana over the next few weeks/months. But, as I said in that piece, “the evidence is not particularly strong just yet, meaning there is plenty of uncertainty about whether we are actually seeing increasing infections, where they’re occurring, and how bad things could get.”

Today let’s look at the relatively optimistic present, where things in Louisiana are about as good as they have been — while still being in a deadly global pandemic — since early March.

In much of America right now, there is ample evidence that things are getting bad. There were nearly 70,000 new cases reported nationally on Oct. 16, the most since July, and cases are rising faster than tests nationally.



Jeff Asher analysis: Signs of 3rd wave of coronavirus are present, but no reason to panic

There is growing evidence that Louisiana’s next wave of COVID-19 is at our doorstep, just as the state begins to relax restrictions. Still, th…

Wisconsin reported over 4,000 new cases on Oct. 16 with 28% of tests coming back positive, indicating that the number of infections is significantly higher than even that incredible number of known new cases. The Dakotas are seeing some of the highest rates of new cases in the country.

It is not just the U.S. either. Countries across Europe are implementing new restrictions in the face of a new surge.

But so far, Louisiana has been spared the COVID spike that is gripping much of the country.

So far.

A partial explanation may be that Louisiana was arguably the only state in the country to have an initial wave in March and a second wave in June/July. Louisiana’s re-opening has also been cautious and staggered, which has helped to prevent outbreaks over a month after the state entered Phase 3.



Jeff Asher: It's hard to see how celebrating Mardi Gras 2021 in the usual way makes sense

‘We know very little about what the virus will be doing four months from now’

Fewer than 5% of tests reported statewide have come back positive on 13 of the first 14 days of October where data was reported. The data has been even better in Orleans Parish, where tests have come back positive at a rate of 2.5% or less on all 14 days.

Florida, by contrast, fully re-opened restaurants, bars, and gyms, among other businesses, on Sept. 28 despite still logging around 100 deaths per day and a positivity rate of over 10%, and the state is already seeing increasing cases and a climbing positive test rate.

Meanwhile, the evidence of increasing COVID in Louisiana that I wrote about last time has not really panned out. COVID-related hospitalizations are up slightly from where they were in early October, but they have been relatively steady for much of the last three weeks. And Google searches for COVID symptoms looked like they were increasing in early October, but that trend seems less clear now than it did a week or two ago.

The progress that Louisiana has made is real, but it is also fragile.

Data from Tulane and LSU

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