losing

fitness

S.F. CrossFit is closing. Here’s what Bay Area fitness culture is losing

When San Francisco CrossFit co-founders Kelly and Juliet Starrett reopened their gym outdoors this summer, they had to adapt the handshakes that usually start each class for the pandemic. Handshakes were verboten, of course, but members of the city’s first CrossFit gym — one of the first two dozen or so worldwide — would tap elbows or wave before the workout began, a small gesture that spoke to a larger culture of inclusion and community.

Before people began squatting or sprinting, the ritual was a way of forcing them to see each other. “People are looking for reasons to belong to each other, but they need a catalyst for that,” Kelly Starrett said. “Our gym gave us that opportunity to do that.”

But the challenges of operating in 2020 — the reopening fits and starts, the strict limits on capacity, the dramatic drop in revenue as people left the gym or left town — proved too much for the couple and their business. On Sunday, Nov. 15, the gym will hold its final WOD, or workout of the day, then close permanently.

Before CrossFit was a household name and the CrossFit Games aired on CBS, Kelly and Juliet Starrett started doing deadlifts, burpees and thrusters in their Richmond District backyard. Both are former competitive whitewater paddlers (Juliet was a two-time world champion), and Kelly, a physical therapist,

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health

Supreme court to hear Obamacare case that may lead to 20m losing insurance

For more than a decade, Republicans have sought to destroy the signature achievement of the Obama administration – the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP

Exactly one week after election day, they might succeed.

After an election season like no other, in the middle of a pandemic, the supreme court will hear a case that could result in 20 million Americans losing their insurance, along with a raft of other insurance benefits disappearing from American life. Or not.



a group of people holding a sign: Adelys Ferro holds a sign in support of Obamacare on 24 October 2020 in North Miami, Florida.


© Photograph: Lynne Sladky/AP
Adelys Ferro holds a sign in support of Obamacare on 24 October 2020 in North Miami, Florida.

All of us have benefited from the act, even if we cannot see it

Abbe Gluck, Yale Law School professor

“This is the one issue now that is causing me tremendous panic,” said Daniel Dawes, author of 150 Years of Obamacare, an attorney and director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine.

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“I have been a cup-runneth-over type of guy, very optimistic in this country, I’m not sure I can even see the cup as half full right now when it comes to the life of the ACA,” Dawes said.

Better known as Obamacare, the ACA expanded government-sponsored health insurance for the poor, required insurance companies to cover a list of benefits such as pregnancy and preventive care, and even required chain restaurants to display calorie counts on their menus. It is intimately intertwined with what Americans think of as health insurance.

“All of us have benefited from the act, even if we cannot see it,” said Abbe Gluck, Yale Law School professor and faculty director of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy. Overturning the law would cause “chaos” and “on-the-ground impacts on Americans” that Gluck said “cannot be overstated”.

The ACA was passed on a party-line vote in 2010, and has been loathed by Republicans ever since, viewed by many conservatives as a government intrusion into healthcare. For eight years, Republicans have sought to “repeal and replace” the law.

They failed to repeal the law legislatively after Trump’s election, despite controlling all legislative levers of government. They did, however, take the teeth out of one hated provision, called the “individual mandate”.

The individual mandate clause required all Americans to obtain health insurance or pay a tax penalty. The penalty was repealed in Trump’s 2017 tax law that primarily benefited the rich. Soon after, officials in Texas sued, arguing the entire law was unconstitutional because the individual mandate was such a central tenet.

Texas’s argument has been supported by the Trump administration, which argued because the tax penalty was eliminated, the, “rest of the ACA must also fall”.

Whether the court will overturn the law or eliminate only one provision stands on a question of “severability”, a legal doctrine that allows judges to, in the words of Chief Justice John Roberts, take “a scalpel rather than a bulldozer” to statutes.

“What is highly unorthodox

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fitness

Alexandra Cane opens up about her ‘fitness journey’, describing life after losing two stone

She’s the 2018 Love Island star who famously lost two stone following a health and lifestyle overhaul. 

And on Monday Alexandra Cane opened up about her ‘fitness journey’ and past relationship with food and alcohol as she shared a short video of her gym-honed physique on Instagram. 

The 29-year-old looked sensational in a white and blue sports co-ord, featuring a sports bra and a pair of skin-tight leggings. 

Fitness fanatic: Alexandra Cane opened up about her 'fitness journey' on Monday, in the caption of a short selfie video of her gym-honed physique that she posted to Instagram

Fitness fanatic: Alexandra Cane opened up about her ‘fitness journey’ on Monday, in the caption of a short selfie video of her gym-honed physique that she posted to Instagram

The outfit revealed the reality star’s washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure as she struck a pose in front of a full length mirror.  

Alexandra pulled her raven tresses pulled back in a tight pony tail, with just a hint of smokey make-up accentuating her good looks. 

In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self. 

Describing how bad things used to be, she wrote: ‘I experienced years of no purpose, attempting the gym numerous times with money wasted on memberships I never used because I was so scared & didn’t have a clue what I was doing.  

Curvy: The stars blue and white fitness co-ord revealed the reality star's washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure

Curvy: The stars blue and white fitness co-ord revealed the reality star’s washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure

Opening up: In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self

Opening up: In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self

‘Last year I hit rock bottom and knew that no one was going to save me but myself.

‘I had an unhealthy relationship with food & alcohol which I was using as coping mechanisms to mask what was really going on underneath.’

Alexandra decided things could not go on as they were, and she turned her life around by heading to the gym and losing two stone in just three. 

She said: ‘A solid year of self development has transformed me not only physically, but most importantly, mentally. I am a different woman.’

The reality star also emphasised that external appearance is not everything, and it is important to care for yourself on the inside as well as out.

Candid:  On Sunday evening Alexandra shared more words of sage advice, as she opened up to her 1.4 million Instagram followers during a Q and A on her Instagram story

Candid:  On Sunday evening Alexandra shared more words of sage advice, as she opened up to her 1.4 million Instagram followers during a Q and A on her Instagram story

Open: The star cut a cosy appearance in a big cream turtle-neck jumper, as she took a series of selfies and responded to questions

Open: The star cut a cosy appearance in a big cream turtle-neck jumper, as she took a series of selfies and responded to questions

Self love: When asked what she does to fend away loneliness, the brunette penned, 'taking myself on dates... Like what I'm doing right now, taking my ass to the cinema'

Self love: When asked what she does to fend away loneliness, the brunette penned, ‘taking myself on dates… Like what I’m doing right now, taking my ass to the cinema’

She penned: ‘The aesthetics were fun for a while, but recent events (pandemic, stress etc) have emphasised the importance of truly looking after yourself from the inside out. Self care is not selfish, it’s necessary.’ 

The previous evening, Alexandra shared more words of sage advice,

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health

Liz Weston: How losing Obamacare could cost you

If the Supreme Court throws out the Affordable Care Act, your finances and your future could pay the price.

THE RETURN OF PREEXISTING CONDITIONS

The Trump administration and a group of Republican attorneys general have asked that the entire law be thrown out. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments on Nov. 10.

Before the ACA, insurers routinely used preexisting health conditions as a reason to deny coverage or charge people more. Preexisting conditions included serious ailments such as cancer or heart disease as well as more common conditions such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, asthma, diabetes and obesity, and temporary conditions including pregnancy. Insurers denied about 1 in 5 applications for individual policies because of preexisting conditions, and some employer-provided group policies required people to wait up to a year before their preexisting conditions were covered.

President Trump signed an executive order in September announcing “a steadfast commitment to always protecting individuals with preexisting conditions,” but the order alone can’t force insurers to offer coverage if the ACA is struck down.

And America is a land of preexisting conditions. Half of adults under age 65, or up to 133 million people, had health issues that could cause them to be denied coverage or charged exorbitant premiums, according to a 2017 government analysis.

‘USE IT AND LOSE IT’ COVERAGE

Health insurance is meant to help people pay their medical expenses and avoid potentially catastrophic bills. Before Obamacare, however, using your insurance could cause you to lose it.

If someone with an individual insurance policy got sick, the insurer could scour the person’s application looking for errors. Even minor mistakes could cause the company to revoke the policy, a practice called

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medicine

Medicine, Education, and Investment Jobs at High Risk of Losing Talent, According to Workforce Logiq’s New Q3 2020 Labor Market Report

Predictive workforce intelligence shows all but three U.S. states – New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New Jersey – decreased in employee volatility

Workforce Logiq, a global provider of AI-powered workforce intelligence, technology, and services, today released its Q3 2020 Workforce Management Benchmark Report. The market analysis, which offers a predictive quarterly snapshot of U.S. talent volatility for professional and knowledge workers, reveals the total number of these employees categorized as volatile – and more likely to switch jobs – is down 7% over last quarter.

“The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have a rollercoaster impact on the labor market. Our benchmarks indicate employment sentiment is stabilizing after a highly volatile second quarter,” said Jim Burke, Workforce Logiq’s CEO. “Given recent corporate downsizing announcements, new COVID-19 spikes, and continued economic difficulty, employee volatility and retention risk may pick back up through end-of-year. Every employer needs to be equipped with data and context to make fast, accurate, and cost-effective talent decisions that help them ride out the uncertainty and plan an optimal workforce to take their organizations into 2021.”

The report, which explores employment volatility across major industries, job functions, metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), and states, is based on Workforce Logiq’s proprietary and patent-pending workforce analytics and data science. Key findings include:

  • All but three of the top 35 job categories – Doctors and Medicine (up 13%), Education (up 10%), and Investment (up 2%) – saw decreased risk of losing talent over the quarter. Public Safety (-33%) and Skilled Trade (-26%) showed the biggest volatility decreases. Of the 19 industry sectors, 13 showed quarterly score degradation compared to only five in the second quarter.

  • Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation jumped to the top spot for worker volatility. At 16% above the national average, this hard-hit industry moved ahead of Finance and Insurance (60.1), Mining, Quarrying, and Gas Extraction (60.0), Utilities (56.7), and Transportation and Warehousing (55.9) with the highest average TRR ScoreSM (60.3).

  • Recruiting jobs and finance roles are now tied for having the largest percentage of employees open to exploring new opportunities. Both functions are 76% above the national average for volatility. Marketing (74%), HR (66%), Investment (54%), and Engineering (52%) follow closely behind.

  • The utility industry experienced the highest increase in talent retention risk. The sector’s employment volatility increased 13% over Q2. Mining, Quarrying, and Gas Extraction was one of the few industries to show improvement (-9%).

  • District of Columbia (DC) is now the most volatile geographic area in the U.S., moving ahead of New York at 32% above the average for worker volatility. This shift is likely due to spikes in election and COVID-19 uncertainty, given DC’s heavy concentration of government and public service jobs and lack of operational control over federal buildings. All the top 25 MSAs, and all states except for New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New Jersey, decreased in volatility. Baltimore-Columbia-Townson, MD saw a considerable 27% improvement.

“Top workforce leaders anticipate and hedge against both retention risk and talent gaps with fast, strategic moves,” said Dr. Christy

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health

From losing loved ones to volunteering for a vaccine

Anil Hebbar
Anil Hebbar runs a company making medical devices in Mumbai

In September, a close friend of Anil Hebbar died of Covid-19 in India’s western city of Mumbai after being ferried around three hospitals over five days.

Mr Hebbar, who runs a medical equipment firm, had visited his 62-year-old friend, a well-known social worker, in the intensive care unit, hours before his life ended.

The social worker was not the only friend Mr Hebbar lost during the pandemic. Since March, 10 people he knew well have succumbed to the virus in Mumbai, which quickly emerged as a hotspot. The city has reported more than 230,000 cases so far.

“It was all very overwhelming. I felt this had to stop. That’s one reason I decided to volunteer for the Covid-19 vaccine trial,” Mr Hebbar, 56, told me.

Earlier this month, he signed himself up for the clinical trials for a vaccine being developed by pharmaceuticals group AstraZeneca and Oxford University.

The vaccine is made from a virus which is a weakened version of a common cold virus that causes infections in chimpanzees. It has been genetically changed so that it is impossible to grow in humans, according to Dr Tania Thomas of the Oxford Vaccine Group. It is also one of the most promising Covid-19 vaccines among some 180 being tested around the world. None has yet completed clinical trials.

syringe with vaccine
Some 1,600 volunteers are receiving the Oxford vaccine in India

Mr Hebbar is among the more than 20,000 volunteers who have signed up for this trial in the UK, Brazil, South Africa and India. In India, he has joined 1,600 volunteers who are receiving doses at 15 centres across the country. With more than seven million reported infections, India has the second highest caseload worldwide after the US.

The trials will find out whether the vaccine induces good immune responses and whether it causes any unacceptable side effects. Adult participants will be randomised to receive one or two doses of either the vaccine or a licensed vaccine that will be used as a “control” for comparison.

It was not easy for Mr Hebbar to convince his family to join what is essentially an altruistic – and potentially risky – trial.

His wife, a professor of development studies at a leading social sciences school, was not pleased about it, he says. His 11-year-old daughter quizzed him on what a vaccine trial meant. Reports about the brief suspension of trials after two volunteers fell sick in UK stoked the family’s anxieties.

But not Mr Hebbar’s. “I didn’t worry at all. I have faith in science,” he says.

In early October, he called up a hospital in Mumbai which was conducting the second and third phases of the trials. He was told that 55 people had volunteered for the six-month trial, but finding the remaining 45 in a planned 100-volunteer trial at the hospital was “becoming difficult”.

A health worker collects a nasal swab sample of an employee of Justdial call centre, to conduct a Rapid Antigen test for COVID-19, at the Justdial head office in Mumbai, India, 09 October 2020.
Mumbai has been one of India’s worst-hit cities

Next morning, he drove to the hospital where

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