Listeria

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Outbreak of Listeria Cases Traced to Deli Meats


Of the nine victims interviewed by investigators, all had eaten Italian-style cold cuts, such as salami, mortadella and prosciutto, that were prepackaged or purchased at the deli. A specific type of meat or supplier has not yet been identified, however.

The CDC recommends avoiding eating deli meat unless it is heated to an internal temperature of 165 or until steaming hot just before serving.

Symptoms of a listeria infection

Listeriosis, the infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, most often causes sickness in adults 65 and older, people with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and newborns. Symptoms may include headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, fever, muscle aches and convulsions.

People usually report symptoms one to four weeks after eating food contaminated with listeria. But some people have reported symptoms as late as 70 days after exposure to as early as the same day of exposure.

Listeriosis is diagnosed when a bacterial culture grows the germ from a sample of body tissue or fluid, such as blood, spinal fluid or the placenta. It is treated with antibiotics.

About 1,600 people in the U.S. get listeriosis each year, resulting in about 260 deaths, the CDC estimates. Americans 65 and over are four times more likely to get a listeria infection than others.


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Deadly listeria outbreak possibly linked to deli meat

Oct. 24 (UPI) — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it’s investigating an outbreak of listeria possibly linked to deli-style meats that has caused at least one death.

The outbreak has sickened 10 people, all of whom were hospitalized, in Florida, Massachusetts and New York. The death was reported in Florida.

The CDC said all those who were sick reported eating Italian-style meats, including salami, mortadella and prosciutto. The sick said they purchased both prepackaged meats and those sliced at a deli counter.

“The investigation is ongoing to determine if there is a specific type of deli meat or common supplier linked to illness,” the agency said.

The CDC advised those who are at a higher risk of becoming sick with listeriosis to avoid eating deli meats unless they’re cooked to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headaches, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, convulsions, diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms. In pregnant women, the infection can cause early delivery or miscarriage.

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CDC warns multi-state Listeria outbreak from deli meats



a close up of a knife: This photo is an electron micrograph of a listeria bacterium in tissue.


© CDC/Balasubr Swaminathan/Peggy Hayes
This photo is an electron micrograph of a listeria bacterium in tissue.

A Listeria outbreak has sickened 10 people across three states, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believes deli meats are the cause.

The CDC issued a warning about the outbreak Friday, which has sent ten people from Florida, Massachusetts and New York to the hospital and led to the death of one person in Florida.

Deli meat was the likely the source of the outbreak, the agency said. Nine victims reported eating Italian-style meats, such as salami, though the CDC has yet to identify a common meat or supplier as the source.

The median age of those infected was 81 and most were female. While many are unlikely to get seriously ill from Listeria, people 65 and older, those with weakened immune systems and pregnant women are at a higher risk for becoming sick.

Listeria can be particularly dangerous for pregnant women. Infection during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery or life threatening infection of the newborn.

Symptoms of infection usually begin one to four weeks after eating contaminated food and can include fever, muscle aches, headache, confusion and loss of balance.

Previous Listeria outbreaks have been linked to hard boiled eggs, mushrooms and soft cheeses.

The CDC advises those who are at high risk for infection to avoid eating deli meat, unless is thoroughly heated first. The agency also advises storing the meat in the refrigerator, away from other food and keeping surrounding surfaces clean.

The investigation into the outbreak is ongoing.

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Former Blue Bell Creameries CEO faces charges in connection with alleged listeria contamination coverup

A Texas grand jury charged Paul Kruse, Blue Bell Creameries’ former CEO and president, was charged with wire fraud and conspiracy in connection with an alleged cover-up of the company’s 2015 listeria outbreak, the Department of Justice announced on Wednesday.



text, letter: OVERLAND PARK, KS - APRIL 21: Blue Bell Ice Cream is seen on shelves of an Overland Park grocery store prior to being removed on April 21, 2015 in Overland Park, Kansas. Blue Bell Creameries recalled all products following a Listeria contamination. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)


© Jamie Squire/Getty Images
OVERLAND PARK, KS – APRIL 21: Blue Bell Ice Cream is seen on shelves of an Overland Park grocery store prior to being removed on April 21, 2015 in Overland Park, Kansas. Blue Bell Creameries recalled all products following a Listeria contamination. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Kruse, who served as the company’s CEO and president from 2004 to 2017, was charged with seven counts of wire fraud and conspiracy for an alleged scheme to cover up what the company knew about the listeria contamination in Blue Bell products, according to the Department of Justice.

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“We firmly believe the charges will be dismissed because they are untimely,” said Chris Flood, who represents Kruse. “We look forward to a jury hearing what really happened in 2015 and Blue Bell’s response to the unfortunate events.”

Blue Bell said it would be inappropriate for the company to comment on Kruse’s legal situation since he is no longer with the company.

According to the indictment, Kruse allegedly directed employees to remove potentially contaminated products from store freezers without notifying retailers or consumers of the real reason. Kruse instructed employees to tell customers who asked about the removed items that there was an “unspecified issue with a manufacturing machine,” the indictment alleges.

Blue Bell did not issue an immediate recall of the products nor did the company inform customers about the listeria contamination, according to the indictment.

“US consumers rely on food producers and suppliers to ensure the safety of the nation’s food supply.The charges announced today show that if an individual violates food safety rules or conceals relevant information, we will seek to hold them accountable,” said Judy McMeekin, associate commissioner for regulatory affairs at the Food and Drug Administration, in a news release.”We will continue to investigate and bring to justice those who jeopardize public health.”

The ice cream was linked to 10 listeria cases in four states and resulted in three deaths in Kansas. In May, the company pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors for distributing adulterated food products and agreed to pay $19.3 million in fines for shipping contaminated ice cream during the 2015 listeria outbreak. The company shut down all its plants in 2015 cleanings and updates, according to the news release.

Listeriosis is a potentially fatal infection caused by the germ listeria, which is found in soil, water, raw milk and some animals like poultry and cattle. Unlike many other germs, it can grow in the cold temperature of a refrigerator or in a food processing plant.

– Shannon Liao contributed to this report

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Ex-Blue Bell Creameries Chief Indicted Over Listeria Spread

AUSTIN, TX — A Texas grand jury charged the former president of ice cream manufacturer maker Blue Bell Creameries after accusations of a cover-up linked to sales of Listeria-tainted ice cream in 2015, U.S. Department of Justice officials said Wednesday.

The indictment was filed in federal court in Austin, according to an advisory. Former Blue Bell President Paul Kruse was charged with seven counts of wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud, officials said, after the executive was accused of efforts to conceal from customers what the company knew about Listeria contamination in certain Blue Bell products.

According to the indictment, Texas state officials notified Blue Bell in February 2015 that two ice cream products from the company’s Brenham, Texas, factory tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, a dangerous pathogen that can lead to serious illness or death in vulnerable populations such as pregnant women, newborns, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems, justice officials explained.

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Kruse subsequently was accused of orchestrating a scheme to deceive certain Blue Bell customers — including directing employees to remove potentially contaminated products from store freezers without notifying retailers or consumers about the real reason for the withdrawal — officials said.

The indictment also accuses Kruse of directing company employees to tell customers who asked about the removal that there was an unspecified issue with a manufacturing machine. The company did not immediately recall the products or issue any formal communication to inform customers about the potential Listeria contamination, U.S. Department of Justice officials added.

“American consumers trust that the individuals who lead food manufacturing companies will put the public safety before profits,” Acting Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Bossert Clark of the Justice Department’s Civil Division said in a prepared statement. “The Department of Justice will take appropriate action against those who ship contaminated products and choose not to tell consumers about known risks.”

Judy McMeekin, Pharm.D., Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added: “U.S. consumers rely on food producers and suppliers to ensure the safety of the nation’s food supply. The charges announced today show that if an individual violates food safety rules or conceals relevant information, we will seek to hold them accountable. We will continue to investigate and bring to justice those who jeopardize public health.”

Michael Mentavlos, special agent-in-charge of the Department of Defense Criminal Investigative Service Southwest Field Office, pointed to the importance of food safety for members of the military: “The Defense Criminal Investigative Service’s number one priority is the safety and well-being of America’s war fighters and their families,” the agent said in a prepared statement. “The results of this investigation are an example of DCIS’ determination to enforce food safety standards, as required by Defense Department contracts. These standards not only protect individuals, but are paramount to military readiness.”

The indictment, returned Tuesday in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, further said the March 2015 tests conducted by the FDA and

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