Limbaugh

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I watched my sister die, so I understand what Rush Limbaugh is going through

It appears that Rush Limbaugh is dying. He announced on his radio show Monday that his lung cancer had gotten worse and is “going in the wrong direction.”

I have never cared for Limbaugh’s kind of politics. I’ve always felt like the right-wing talk radio host’s sole purpose was to further polarize America and push conservatives further away from a middle ground.

In spite of that, I am saddened that his cancer is terminal. I would like to see his condition turn around, but he doesn’t seem to think that it will.

“It’s tough to realize that the days where I do not think I’m under a death sentence are over,” the 69-year-old host said.

“We all know that we’re going to die at some point,” he added. “But when you have a terminal disease diagnosis that has a time frame to it, then that puts a different psychological and even physical awareness to it.”

He described his life the past eight months as a roller coaster, with lots of ups and downs.

“Many people have experienced this,” he said. “If it isn’t lung cancer, it’s some kind of cancer. If it isn’t you, it is someone really close to you.”

My father died of lung cancer in 2006 at the age of 91. But it is my sister’s death in 1995 from myeloid metaplasia, a rare form of bone marrow cancer, that haunts me still. Patricia was only 54.

It is difficult to imagine what it must be like to learn that you are dying. For some, I suppose, such a diagnosis could be met with relief. After months of agonizing pain, there is respite in knowing that it will be over soon.

With such advance notice, there also is a rare opportunity to try to right what you have done wrong. To say to loved ones words that needed to be said. And to ask for forgiveness for the things you cannot change.

But for most, such news likely would cause overwhelming grief. Most of us, regardless of our age, feel as though we have much to live for and many more things to do. Taking that opportunity away seems unfair.

Like Limbaugh, Patricia understood that her illness was considered terminal. Still, she believed that she would somehow defy the odds and live past the maximum 10-year survival period of people with her form of cancer.

She thought that she could beat the monstrous illness if she fought hard enough. The idea that she wielded such control got her through the painful days and nights. She fought with every bit of strength she had — until she couldn’t.

She had grown thin and frail. Food wouldn’t stay down, but she kept trying to eat. She used to enjoy the broccoli casserole from Piccadilly cafeteria, and when she asked for some, I rushed out to get it. But even the aroma of it made her nauseous.

With her spleen filled with blood — one of the effects

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Rush Limbaugh says lung cancer has shown progression ‘in the wrong direction’

Conservative talk radio show host Rush Limbaugh says he’s had a setback in his fight against advanced lung cancer.

Limbaugh, 69, said recent scans show “some progression of cancer.” It’s “not dramatic, but it is the wrong direction,” he told listeners Monday, according to a transcript posted on his website.

The host said Monday that he has been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer.

On Feb. 3, he first disclosed that he was sick. The following day, President Donald Trump awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, during the State of the Union address.

Limbaugh said that he had been reluctant to speak too much about his illness on-air, in part because “I’m not the only one that’s going through hardships, challenging times.”

“I want to stress here that I know countless numbers of you are experiencing the same thing. If it isn’t lung cancer, it’s some kind of cancer. If it isn’t you, it’s somebody really close to you. If it isn’t an illness, it’s something,” he said Monday.

Limbaugh said that prior to the recent scans that showed some progression, “the scans had shown that we had rendered the cancer dormant.”

“So we have to tweak the treatment plan, which we did, and the chemotherapy drugs in hopes of keeping additional progression at bay for as long as possible,” Limbaugh said. “The idea now is to keep it where it is or maybe have it reduce again. We’ve shown that that is possible.”

This story originally appeared on NBCNews.com.

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Rush Limbaugh gives cancer update: ‘Days where I do not think I’m under a death sentence are over’

Conservative talk radio legend Rush Limbaugh told listeners Monday that he can no longer deny he’s “under a death sentence” due to the progression of his stage 4 lung cancer.

Mr. Limbaugh, who first announced his diagnosis in February, said during his show that scans taken earlier this month showed “some progression of cancer” after it had initially been rendered “dormant.”

“It is cancer, it eventually outsmarts pretty much everything you throw at it,” Mr. Limbaugh said.

“From the moment you get the diagnosis, there’s a part of you every day, OK, that’s it, life’s over, you just don’t know when,” he said. “So, during the period of time after the diagnosis, you do what you can to prolong life, do what you can to prolong a happy life. You measure a happy life against whatever medication it takes.

“It’s tough to realize that the days where I do not think I’m under a death sentence are over,” he continued. “Now, we all are, is the point. We all know that we’re going to die at some point, but when you have a terminal disease diagnosis that has a time frame to it, then that puts a different psychological and even physical awareness to it.”

Mr. Limbaugh, who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom during President Trump’s State of the Union address in February, went on to say the progression of the cancer was “not dramatic” but still in the “wrong direction.” He said he’s now under a treatment plan aimed at keeping the progression at bay for as long as possible.

“I feel very blessed to be here speaking with you today,” he said. “Some days are harder than others. I do get fatigued now. I do get very, very tired now. I’m not gonna mislead you about that. But I am extremely grateful to be able to come here to the studio and to maintain as much normalcy as possible — and it’s still true,” he said. “You know, I wake up every day and thank God that I did. I go to bed every night praying I’m gonna wake up.”

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