June

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Albany County sees most COVID-19 hospitalizations since June 1

ALBANY – Eight more Albany County residents were hospitalized overnight after testing positive for the coronavirus, the county said on Thursday.

That brings the county’s total to 24, the highest since June 1, with two patients in intensive care.

County Executive Dan McCoy said the county also saw 19 new cases, for a total of 3,526 since the pandemic began. There are 157 active cases in the county.

“If this isn’t a warning sign, then I don’t know what is,” McCoy said in a statement. “For a long time, we saw spikes in positive cases without it having a serious effect on our hospital data, but that is clearly not the case. And the sad truth is that as you start to see hospitalizations rise, you are likely to see more people losing their lives to the virus.”

The county has seen 140 deaths from the virus. For the Capital Region, COVID-19-related deaths now top 360.


Of the new cases in Albany County, seven had close contact with other positive cases, three reported out of state travel, three are healthcare workers or live in congregate settings and six did not have a clear source of transmission.

The rising number of cases in the region and state is sign that the so-called second wave of the coronavirus is upon us.

‘The next wave has started.’ Capital Region braces as COVID-19 numbers grow

The increase is also fueling Vermont’s insistence that residents of Capital Region counties – and most other counties in the state – quarantine before or after arriving in the Green Mountain state.

Surging cases in Capital Region mean quarantine in Vermont

Washington County is the only county on the state border with Vermont that is not required to quarantine. Under Vermont’s rules, visitors from New York must quarantine for 14 days after arriving in the state though a quarantine there can be avoided if New Yorker’s quarantine for seven days at home and then immediately arrive in Vermont with proof of a recent negative test for the virus.

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Active COVID-19 Cases In New Hampshire The Most Since June: Data

CONCORD, NH — Another 92 New Hampshire residents tested positive for COVID-19 after more than 7,000 polymerase chain reaction specimens were collected on Saturday.

Prior test counts were upgraded and nearly 900 tests are pending bringing the daily positivity rate to 0.8 percent. Most of the positive tests were found via PCR testing with a little less than a third by antigen tests.

There are currently 1,032 active COVID-19 cases diagnosed in New Hampshire — the most since mid-June.

Hospitalizations in New Hampshire are still low — 23 and only 7 percent of cases required more care since the pandemic started in early March.

Of the new cases, 12 were children, cases were split nearly evenly between women and men, and some cases are still under investigation by the state, including determining the residency of five new cases. Of the rest, 23 reside in Rockingham County, 20 live in Hillsborough County outside of Manchester and Nashua, 10 live in Merrimack, and nine live in Nashua. The increase in cases today as well as extensive numbers during the past few weeks in Rockingham County, including outbreaks at Portsmouth restaurants, have pushed the county into the substantial community transmission category on the school data dashboard.

“Five of the new cases had no identified risk factors,” the State Joint Information Center said. “Community-based transmission continues to occur in the State and has been identified in all counties. Of those with complete risk information, most of the cases have either had close contact with a person with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis, are associated with an outbreak setting, or have recently traveled.”

Accumulatively, 10,328 have been diagnosed with coronavirus while 8,823 have recovered from the virus — about 85 percent. The state said 331,561 residents have been tested or 22.2 percent via 579,186 PCR tests. Another 32,000 people have been tested with antibody tests.

Approximately 4,450 people are under public health monitoring in New Hampshire.

In K-12 schools in New Hampshire, there are 66 active cases after the state reported a number of new school cases since Friday.

Heron Pond Elementary School in Milford has two active cases; Manchester Central High School has its first case; Milford High School has two new active cases; North Hampton School has a second new active case; the Penacook Elementary School in Concord has a new case; the Riddle Brook Elementary School has its four active case; the South Range Elementary School in Derry has its second active case; and Saint Joseph Regional School in Keene and St. Mary Academy in Dover both have their first cases.

There are also five active cases at the University of New Hampshire School of Law in Concord while there are 18 active cases at UNH in Durham. The university has 187 cases. Plymouth State College and Keene State College have four active cases each while Colby-Sawyer College, Dartmouth College, Franklin Pierce University, and White Mountains Community College have a single case each. Rivier University has five active cases while New England College

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Alabama adds 3,852 COVID cases after influx of backlogged data dating back to June

Alabama added more than 3,800 COVID cases yesterday after a huge influx of backlogged data dating back to June.

The Alabama Department of Public Health showed a total of 180,916 coronavirus cases in the state, up 3,852 from the day before. Of that total, 973 were confirmed cases and 2,879 were probable. Of that 2,879, the 2,565 were antigen tests from a facility in Mobile that dated back to the summer.

The cases “will be classified as probable COVID-19 cases reported on 10/22/20 even though the tests were performed during June through Oct. 18. All laboratories are required by law to report all results (including positive and negative results) for (COVID-19) to ADPH,” the agency said in an announcement.

“Delays in reporting by required reporters is not within control of ADPH. Processing the backlog will not impact the ADPH COVID-19 Risk Indicator Dashboard,” ADPH added.

The state added 16 deaths to bring its total to 2,859.

ADPH reports 864 patients are currently hospitalized due to coronavirus.

Here are the latest county-by-county numbers from the Alabama Department of Public Health. The numbers include both confirmed and probable cases with the overnight increases shown in parenthesis:

Autauga – 2030 (+7)

Baldwin – 6615 (+140)

Barbour – 1012 (+15)

Bibb – 825 (+14)

Blount – 1911 (+13)

Bullock – 639 (+2)

Butler – 1002 (+1)

Calhoun – 4224 (+35)

Chambers – 1343 (+7)

Cherokee – 731 (+5)

Chilton – 1858 (+17)

Choctaw – 390 (+2)

Clarke – 1336 (+36)

Clay – 736 (+7)

Cleburne – 551 (+8)

Coffee – 1732 (+15)

Colbert – 1987 (+20)

Conecuh – 560 (+3)

Coosa – 203 (+1)

Covington – 1714 (+15)

Crenshaw – 603 (+1)

Cullman – 2399 (+42)

Dale – 1665 (+11)

Dallas – 1863 (+1)

DeKalb – 3360 (+58)

Elmore – 3173 (+24)

Escambia – 1722 (+3)

Etowah – 4214 (+27)

Fayette – 569 (+8)

Franklin – 2032 (+11)

Geneva – 861 (+9)

Greene – 342

Hale – 758 (+9)

Henry – 643 (+4)

Houston – 3717 (+25)

Jackson – 2125 (+25)

Jefferson – 22987 (+137)

Lamar – 474 (+8)

Lauderdale – 2180 (+32)

Lawrence – 837 (+16)

Lee – 6517 (+21)

Limestone – 2797 (+32)

Lowndes – 704 (+1)

Macon – 530 (+1)

Madison – 9228 (+78)

Marengo – 1002 (+10)

Marion – 1071 (+9)

Marshall – 4372 (+42)

Mobile – 16,788 (+2,320)

Monroe – 645 (+5)

Montgomery – 9978 (+103)

Morgan – 4071 (+35)

Perry – 585 (+2)

Pickens – 836 (+12)

Pike – 1327 (+4)

Randolph – 820 (+8)

Russell – 1928 (+5)

St. Clair – 2891 (+20)

Shelby – 7274 (+70)

Sumter – 472 (+2)

Talladega – 2636 (+25)

Tallapoosa – 1313 (+8)

Tuscaloosa – 10,235 (+87)

Walker – 2755 (+33)

Washington – 734 (+100)

Wilcox – 564 (+2)

Winston – 919 (+6)

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Trump’s Operation Warp Speed adviser says all Americans could be immunized by June

Most Americans may have access to a COVID-19 vaccine by early this spring, one which could potentially immunize them by June, according to Operation Warp Speed’s chief adviser, Dr. Moncef Slaoui.



a hand holding a blue toothbrush: A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled "Vaccine COVID-19" in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.


© Dado Ruvic/Reuters
A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled “Vaccine COVID-19” in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.

“It’s not a certainty, but the plan — and I feel pretty confident — should make it such that by June, everybody could have been immunized in the U.S.,” Slaoui told ABC News’ Bob Woodruff Wednesday morning.

President Donald Trump’s Operation Warp Speed is an effort created to accelerate a vaccine rollout without sacrificing safety. The program has pumped billions of dollars into numerous pharmaceutical companies in hopes of developing one or more safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. The money is intended to help ramp up development, trials and manufacturing while removing financial risk from the companies, in case the vaccines don’t work out.

Despite the rapid pace of vaccine development, Slaoui said he has not received any improper pressure from the White House to expedite the process beyond what he considers safe.

“I’ve had absolutely no pressure, really, no pressure,” Slaoui said, adding that he would have quit if that were the case. “And I have [always] said, if I get undue pressure, I will say it and I will resign.”

Slaoui said the pharmaceutical companies Moderna and Pfizer are likely to be the first with vaccine candidates to apply for emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration, possibly as soon as November or December. If a vaccine is authorized before the end of the year, Slaoui said approximately 20 to 40 million doses of it will be stockpiled and ready for distribution for a limited population.

MORE: UK launching controversial vaccine trials where volunteers will be infected with the coronavirus

“Then we can start immunizing the highest risk people, front-line workers, the health care workers, before the end of the year,” Slaoui told ABC News. “Now, not every one in that population can be immunized in December, but the companies will continue to manufacture and produce vaccine doses — and in January, we plan to have about 60 to 80 million doses of those two vaccines.”

Slaoui said AstraZeneca’s clinical trial is due to resume in the U.S. “imminently.”

This comes as clinical trials for both AstraZeneca’s vaccine were put on regulatory hold by the FDA and pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine candidate were put on a voluntary pause to investigate why certain volunteers developed unexplained illnesses during the trial. AstraZeneca has already resumed its trials in Europe and elsewhere in the world.



a hand holding a toothbrush: A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled "Vaccine COVID-19" in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.


© Dado Ruvic/Reuters
A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled “Vaccine COVID-19” in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.

But halting the two late-stage clinical trials may have caused some vaccine skepticism, despite most scientists saying it’s a sign the process is working, and pointing out that many clinical trials are slowed to investigate potential

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Trump’s Operation Warp Speed adviser says all Americans could be immunized with COVID vaccine by June

Moncef Slaoui is encouraging people to volunteer for vaccine trials.

Most Americans may have access to a COVID-19 vaccine by early this spring, one which could potentially immunize them by June, according to Operation Warp Speed’s chief adviser, Dr. Moncef Slaoui.

“It’s not a certainty, but the plan — and I feel pretty confident — should make it such that by June, everybody could have been immunized in the U.S.,” Slaoui told ABC News’ Bob Woodruff Wednesday morning.

Despite the rapid pace of vaccine development, Slaoui said he has not received any improper pressure from the White House to expedite the process beyond what he considers safe.

“I’ve had absolutely no pressure, really, no pressure,” Slaoui said, adding that he would have quit if that were the case. “And I have [always] said, if I get undue pressure, I will say it and I will resign.”

Slaoui said the pharmaceutical companies Moderna and Pfizer are likely to be the first with vaccine candidates to apply for emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration, possibly as soon as November or December. If a vaccine is authorized before the end of the year, Slaoui said approximately 20 to 40 million doses of it will be stockpiled and ready for distribution for a limited population.

Slaoui said AstraZeneca’s clinical trial is due to resume in the U.S. “imminently.”

This comes as clinical trials for both AstraZeneca’s vaccine were put on regulatory hold by the FDA and pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine candidate were put on a voluntary pause to investigate why certain volunteers developed unexplained illnesses during the trial. AstraZeneca has already resumed its trials in Europe and elsewhere in the world.

PHOTO: A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled "Vaccine COVID-19" in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.

A medical syringe is inserted into a small bottle labeled “Vaccine COVID-19” in this illustration taken April 10, 2020.

But halting the two late-stage clinical trials may have caused some vaccine skepticism, despite most scientists saying it’s a sign the process is working, and pointing out that many

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As Illinois reports 69 COVID-19-related deaths, the highest daily toll since June, state issues plan for vaccine distribution

CHICAGO — Illinois on Wednesday recorded its highest daily coronavirus-related death toll since June as state officials released an early version of its plan for how a vaccine will be distributed once one is approved and available.

The plan “is designed to provide an equitable distribution across the state with priority access going to our most vulnerable populations, front-line health care workers and first responders who directly interact with and treat COVID patients, as well as staff and residents in long-term care facilities,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said during his daily coronavirus news briefing.

The plan will “evolve as vaccine trials come to a conclusion and the FDA decides which to approve,” Pritzker said, noting that there are a range of unknowns around whether vaccinations will require multiple doses and if they will need cold or room temperature storage.

While President Donald Trump has vowed that a vaccination could be available soon, most experts think that won’t happen until next year, a point backed up on Wednesday by Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike.

“Vaccinations, once they arrive, will take many, many months, at the minimum, to actually get into the arms of the people of Illinois,” Ezike said. “So this will unfold in phases, with initially only a small amount of vaccine available, and as production ramps up, more individuals will be able to avail themselves of this countermeasure.”

Once a vaccine is available, the state will build off its existing vaccine registry system that tracks immunizations for children, to track the geographic distribution of vaccines. “And that can help us further direct the traffic of future vaccine to come, if we see that a region that has been hardest hit by the virus and they have a lower percentage of people who have gotten immunized,” Ezike said.

Chicago would get its own distribution of the vaccine directly from the CDC under the plan.

COVID-19 vaccinations will not be mandated, though officials will also work to address “vaccine hesitancy,” Ezike said, noting “people who may need it most might have the reason to be most hesitant, and so we’re going to have to work with communities to address issues, to notify, to educate, to have their questions answered.”

“Illinois will not distribute a vaccine until we have one that is proven safe and effective,” Pritzker said.

The state on Wednesday reported 69 deaths of people with COVID-19 over a 24-hour period on Wednesday, bringing the state-reported death toll to 9,345 people in Illinois since the pandemic began. The last time the statewide death toll for a single day surpassed 60 was June 24, when the number of deaths reported was 64.

The regional trends across the state “are still moving in the wrong direction,” Pritzker said Wednesday.

The seven-day average for deaths climbed to 39 as of Wednesday, still far short of the average daily number of deaths being reported for part of the spring, when the state was in the grip of the first

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Coronavirus vaccine could be widely available by June 2021, head of Operation Warp Speed says

The head of President Trump’s Operation Warp Speed says a COVID-19 vaccine could be made widely available by June 2021, ABC News reports. 

“It’s a plan, it’s not a certainty,” Moncef Slaoui, chief adviser to Operation Warp Speed, told ABC News’s Bob Woodruff. 


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“But the plan should make it such that by June everybody could have been immunized in the United States. We will have enough vaccine doses. I really hope most people will take the vaccines,” Moncef told the outlet. 

Public health officials and experts have projected that a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine could likely be made available to high-risk groups — such as health care workers and the elderly — before the year is out, but a vaccine isn’t likely to be broadly available to all Americans until several months into 2021. 

Earlier this month, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar projected the U.S. could have up to 100 million doses of a vaccine before the year is out and doses for every American sometime between March and April of 2021. 

The U.S. is currently manufacturing doses for all six vaccine candidates supported by Operation Warp Speed, including those developed by Moderna, Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson, which are all currently in late-stage clinical trials. The U.S. is also securing needles, syringes, bottles and other immunization supplies.

AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson recently paused their trials in the U.S. after participants in both trials became ill. 

Moncef told ABC the pharmaceutical companies are “imminently going to have the hold lifted.” 

Slaoui’s prediction comes as the U.S. is currently experiencing a resurgence of cases and is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 8.2 million confirmed cases and more than 221,000 deaths.


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