Journey

fitness

Bengaluru leads the way in fitness journey in ‘new normal’- The New Indian Express

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Garden city, pub city, and now fitness capital… Bengaluru, according to a recent survey, leads the way when it comes to fitness and health consciousness.

A survey by Gympik to assess the impact of Covid-19 on India’s fitness behaviour, shows that the city tops the list in the virtual fitness landscape, with 58 per cent Bengalureans surveyed working out at least 3-4 times a week. Mumbai, with 46 per cent, Delhi/NCR, with 42 pre cent, take the second and third spot, respectively. 

Illustration: Tapas Ranjan

With more than 50,000 respondents from across geographies, the report tracks key wellness trends such as mental health, emerging fitness solutions, and new industry challenges.

The city’s vast population of IT professionals, who work long hours and are prone to health issues, have realised that they need to up their fitness quotient to sustain their line of work.

“Because they have travelled to the West a lot on work-related projects, their exposure to Western themes like CrossFit, long-distance running and yoga – which people are lapping up because of the way the it has propagated there – have influenced them to become fitness conscious,” says Abinav Shankar Narayan, founder, Namma CrossFit, adding that only those who liked lifting weights are eager to return to gyms as training at home does not allow people to lift and drop heavy weights.

Agrees nutrition advisor Shalini Manglani who feels that people in the “tech city” are more savvy with the virtual medium.

According to fitness consultant and personal trainer Bhaskar Prabhu, Bengaluru has fitness enthusiasts who are serious about their workouts.

“Many clients have set up a small gym in their houses so as to not skip their usual routine. This way they don’t have to worry about the safety issues involved in going to a gym,” says Prabhu.

With many living with senior family members, and not wanting to take a risk, Prabhu is not surprised that they have easily adapted to the virtual route.

“This way they feel they are keeping fit and building immunity without stepping out,” he says. 

Bengaluru is a hub for fitness seekers and experts, says Amaresh Ojha, founder-CEO, Gympik.

“Even before Covid-19, Bengaluru had the highest traction for online gym membership sales via our platform, which clearly shows Bengalureans’ inclination towards fitness and wellness,” he adds, pointing out that the average resident in the city is more than enthusiastic about trying out new things, especially when it involves technology.

“It’s this attitude which has made Bangalore top the charts in adopting virtual fitness services as well,” he says.

In a nutshell

  • Bengaluru leads in the virtual fitness landscape with 58%, followed by Mumbai with 46%, Delhi/NCR with 42% surveyed residents working out at least 3-4 times a week. 

  • While deciding to return to the gym, 90% of the members are strongly concerned about the sanitisation measures taken at the fitness centre.

  • 72% of members said they would feel more comfortable at the gym with additional sanitiser dispensers

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fitness

Bengaluru leads the way in fitness journey- The New Indian Express

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Garden city, pub city, and now fitness capital… Bengaluru, according to a recent survey, leads the way when it comes to fitness and health consciousness. A survey by Gympik to assess the impact of Covid-19 on India’s fitness behaviour, shows that the city tops the list in the virtual fitness landscape, with 58 per cent Bengalureans surveyed working out at least 3-4 times a week. Mumbai, with 46 per cent, Delhi/NCR, with 42 pre cent, take the second and third spot, respectively. 

Illustration: Tapas Ranjan

With more than 50,000 respondents from across geographies, the report tracks key wellness trends such as mental health, emerging fitness solutions, and new industry challenges.

The city’s vast population of IT professionals, who work long hours and are prone to health issues, have realised that they need to up their fitness quotient to sustain their line of work.

“Because they have travelled to the West a lot on work-related projects, their exposure to Western themes like CrossFit, long-distance running and yoga – which people are lapping up because of the way the it has propagated there – have influenced them to become fitness conscious,” says Abinav Shankar Narayan, founder, Namma CrossFit, adding that only those who liked lifting weights are eager to return to gyms as training at home does not allow people to lift and drop heavy weights.

Agrees nutrition advisor Shalini Manglani who feels that people in the “tech city” are more savvy with the virtual medium. According to fitness consultant and personal trainer Bhaskar Prabhu, Bengaluru has fitness enthusiasts who are serious about their workouts. “Many clients have set up a small gym in their houses so as to not skip their usual routine. This way they don’t have to worry about the safety issues involved in going to a gym,” says Prabhu. With many living with senior family members, and not wanting to take a risk, Prabhu is not surprised that they have easily adapted to the virtual route. “This way they feel they are keeping fit and building immunity without stepping out,” he says. 

Bengaluru is a hub for fitness seekers and experts, says Amaresh Ojha, founder-CEO, Gympik. “Even before Covid-19, Bengaluru had the highest traction for online gym membership sales via our platform, which clearly shows Bengalureans’ inclination towards fitness and wellness,” he adds, pointing out that the average resident in the city is more than enthusiastic about trying out new things, especially when it involves technology. “It’s this attitude which has made Bangalore top the charts in adopting virtual fitness services as well,” he says.

In a nutshell

Bengaluru leads in the virtual fitness landscape with 58%, followed by Mumbai with 46%, Delhi/NCR with 42% surveyed residents working out at least 3-4 times a week 
While deciding to return to the gym, 90% of the members are strongly concerned about the sanitisation measures taken at the fitness centre
72% of members said they would feel more comfortable at the gym with additional sanitiser dispensers

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fitness

Alexandra Cane opens up about her ‘fitness journey’, describing life after losing two stone

She’s the 2018 Love Island star who famously lost two stone following a health and lifestyle overhaul. 

And on Monday Alexandra Cane opened up about her ‘fitness journey’ and past relationship with food and alcohol as she shared a short video of her gym-honed physique on Instagram. 

The 29-year-old looked sensational in a white and blue sports co-ord, featuring a sports bra and a pair of skin-tight leggings. 

Fitness fanatic: Alexandra Cane opened up about her 'fitness journey' on Monday, in the caption of a short selfie video of her gym-honed physique that she posted to Instagram

Fitness fanatic: Alexandra Cane opened up about her ‘fitness journey’ on Monday, in the caption of a short selfie video of her gym-honed physique that she posted to Instagram

The outfit revealed the reality star’s washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure as she struck a pose in front of a full length mirror.  

Alexandra pulled her raven tresses pulled back in a tight pony tail, with just a hint of smokey make-up accentuating her good looks. 

In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self. 

Describing how bad things used to be, she wrote: ‘I experienced years of no purpose, attempting the gym numerous times with money wasted on memberships I never used because I was so scared & didn’t have a clue what I was doing.  

Curvy: The stars blue and white fitness co-ord revealed the reality star's washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure

Curvy: The stars blue and white fitness co-ord revealed the reality star’s washboard abs and incredible gym-honed figure

Opening up: In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self

Opening up: In an accompanying caption the brunette was candid with her fans about her relationship with the gym and her own sense of self

‘Last year I hit rock bottom and knew that no one was going to save me but myself.

‘I had an unhealthy relationship with food & alcohol which I was using as coping mechanisms to mask what was really going on underneath.’

Alexandra decided things could not go on as they were, and she turned her life around by heading to the gym and losing two stone in just three. 

She said: ‘A solid year of self development has transformed me not only physically, but most importantly, mentally. I am a different woman.’

The reality star also emphasised that external appearance is not everything, and it is important to care for yourself on the inside as well as out.

Candid:  On Sunday evening Alexandra shared more words of sage advice, as she opened up to her 1.4 million Instagram followers during a Q and A on her Instagram story

Candid:  On Sunday evening Alexandra shared more words of sage advice, as she opened up to her 1.4 million Instagram followers during a Q and A on her Instagram story

Open: The star cut a cosy appearance in a big cream turtle-neck jumper, as she took a series of selfies and responded to questions

Open: The star cut a cosy appearance in a big cream turtle-neck jumper, as she took a series of selfies and responded to questions

Self love: When asked what she does to fend away loneliness, the brunette penned, 'taking myself on dates... Like what I'm doing right now, taking my ass to the cinema'

Self love: When asked what she does to fend away loneliness, the brunette penned, ‘taking myself on dates… Like what I’m doing right now, taking my ass to the cinema’

She penned: ‘The aesthetics were fun for a while, but recent events (pandemic, stress etc) have emphasised the importance of truly looking after yourself from the inside out. Self care is not selfish, it’s necessary.’ 

The previous evening, Alexandra shared more words of sage advice,

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health

When Your Breast Cancer Journey Takes an Unexpected Turn

Photo credit: Courtesy of Author
Photo credit: Courtesy of Author

From Marie Claire

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

Around one in eight American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and each is so much more than a statistic. Every Monday during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’ll be chronicling the journey of one Black mother and survivor as she navigates the uncertainty of breast cancer in these uncertain times.

In June, my annual mammogram and subsequent biopsy revealed atypical ductal hyperplasia in my right breast. My Covid-19–filled summer consisted of virtual medical appointments and the isolation of solo visits to the hospital to have medical tests performed. Non-emergency surgeries were on hold due to the pandemic; I spent more than three months waiting to hear that hospitals in my home state of Florida were re-opened. Once the hospitals started allowing patients like myself to move forward, it was confirmed that I would undergo a partial mastectomy.

My breast oncology surgeon informed me that the out-patient procedure was scheduled for September 25, the 17th anniversary of my grandmother’s death. The day of surgery, I woke up and felt her presence. Her loving energy enveloped me and reminded me that I would be held and protected.

It was surreal being dropped off at the hospital before the sunrise, exiting the car, and walking inside, masked up and alone. I entered with my cell phone, license, and insurance card—the only items permitted. I was greeted by friendly admission staff and escorted to the area where I met my pre-op team. My nurse, Jennifer, was an angel with scrubs on. We laughed and talked and laughed. Our sons are the same age, so we had lots of chatter about virtual school angst, 14-year-old boys, our shared love of travel, and cancer. Her sister is a breast cancer survivor, so she knew how to treat my scar-filled upper body with tenderness and reverence.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Author
Photo credit: Courtesy of Author

After my I.V. was connected, vitals taken, and questions regarding my medical history answered, I was taken to have yet another mammogram. More images were needed to pinpoint the exact area that would be targeted for surgery. A trio of two nurses and a radiologist were working with me. One of the nurses asked if I remembered the name of the team who performed the biopsy. I could not recall the name of the main nurse, but I do remember the way she rubbed my back and held my hand when I flinched from the pain; I remember how she calmly and assuredly whispered that I was doing great and reminded me to breathe. I looked at my new nurse with a river of tears streaming down my cheeks and was only able to say, “the only thing I remember is her kindness.” She gave me tissue and let me honor the emotional cleanse that I wasn’t prepared to have in a cold, sterile mammogram room.

When I returned to nurse Jennifer, somehow, she knew there was a

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health

Footprints Mark a Toddler’s Perilous Prehistoric Journey

Several thousand years ago, a young adult moved barefoot across a muddy landscape. A toddler was balanced on the adult’s hip. There were large animals — mammoths and ground sloths — just over the horizon. It was a perilous journey, and scientists reconstructed it by closely studying an exceptional set of human and animal footprints found recently in the southwestern United States.

“This is an amazing trackway,” said Neil Thomas Roach, an anthropologist at Harvard University, who was not involved in the research, which was published online this month in Quaternary Science Reviews. “We rarely get tracks as well preserved as these are.”

It is one of the most extensive Pleistocene-age trackways found to date, and studying it highlights how ancient sets of fossilized footprints can reveal more than even fossilized bones. It’s rare for bones to reveal behaviors, but tracks can shed a lot of light on animal interactions, said Sally C. Reynolds, a paleoecologist at Bournemouth University in England and an author of the study.

The round-trip journey of the prehistoric young adult and the toddler was spotted in 2017 in White Sands National Park in southern New Mexico. The sequence extends more than a mile and includes at least 427 human prints. The out-and-back journey was probably completed in no more than a few hours, the researchers suggest. (The gypsum sand that records the prints doesn’t hold water well, so the muddy conditions that captured the prints would have been short-lived.)

Most of the human footprints were made by a barefoot adolescent of either sex, or a young adult female with roughly size 6 feet, the team determined. But about every 100 yards or so, a few much smaller human prints suddenly appear within the northbound set of tracks.

“We have many adult tracks, and then every now and again we have these tiny baby tracks,” Dr. Reynolds said.

A toddler-aged child was being carried and periodically placed on the muddy ground as the caregiver readjusted his or her human load, the researchers surmised, based on the three-dimensional digital models they had assembled. There are no toddler footprints within the southbound set of tracks, so the child probably wasn’t carried on that journey.

It’s likely that the child rode on the young person’s left hip. There’s a slight asymmetry between the left and right tracks on the northbound set of tracks. That’s consistent with someone carrying extra weight on that side, Dr. Reynolds said.

She and her collaborators estimated that the young person was moving at just shy of four miles per hour. That’s a good clip: “Imagine running for a bus,” Dr. Reynolds said. “It’s not a stroll.”

The urgency of the journey might have had something to do with the toddler, Dr. Reynolds suggests. “Why else would you travel so fast but encumber yourself with a child?”

There was another reason, however, for making haste over the landscape — the presence of large and potentially dangerous animals. Both a giant sloth and a mammoth ambled

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health

‘Coronavirus Is Stealing Precious Time in My Journey to Becoming a Mother’

In the November 2020 ‘Strong Mind’ issue of Women’s Health, on sale now, we profile a series of women and explore the effect of the pandemic on their mental health.



a person wearing a white shirt and green bushes: Jessica Davies, a writer, reveals how suffering an ectopic pregnancy during lockdown - amid a Covid-19 'baby boom' - impacted on her mental health.


© Provided by Women’s Health UK
Jessica Davies, a writer, reveals how suffering an ectopic pregnancy during lockdown – amid a Covid-19 ‘baby boom’ – impacted on her mental health.

When the coronavirus exerted its grips on all corners of life – from work to school and beyond – it also made matters more challenging for the women experiencing a less-than-smooth path to motherhood. IVF clinics temporarily closed and many hospitals focused resources on tackling the pandemic.

Here, Jessica Davies, a 38-year-old writer from London, reveals how suffering an ectopic pregnancy, something that affects around 1 in every 90 pregnancies in the UK, during lockdown, amid talk of a Covid-19 ‘baby boom’, impacted on her mental health.

‘I had an ectopic pregnancy during lockdown’

It took five pregnancy tests before I would allow myself to believe that I was pregnant. It was early April, three years since my husband, Matt, and I had started trying to have a baby. Something that meant so much to us.

We started out optimistic we’d be able to conceive easily – but I felt like I had failed every time my period arrived. When doctors labelled the difficulty we had conceiving as medically ‘unexplained’ infertility, I was frustrated.

I reduced stress with yoga, and quit drinking as well as cut down on caffeine, to increase my chances of falling pregnant. Nevertheless, getting pregnant seemed like a roll of the dice; a friend might call after an evening when they’d been drinking alcohol while I’d been teetotal, to tell me they were expecting. I didn’t know how to tell people that we were trying and not having any luck, so I kept quiet. With society projecting motherhood as being so deeply ingrained in a woman’s self-worth, I couldn’t shake the feelings of shame.



a person sitting at a table: ‘Coronavirus Is Sabotaging My Race to Motherhood’


‘Coronavirus Is Sabotaging My Race to Motherhood’

Then, last year, I fell pregnant naturally but suffered a miscarriage in the second trimester. It was triggered a period of trauma – and after that there was barely a day that I didn’t cry. It was difficult to enjoy normal things, and I also found it hard to reconnect with friends because most of them were new mums.

I was only just beginning to recover as the UK went into lockdown. We were due to have our initial consultation for IVF in March and were on the verge of our first round when an unexpected positive pregnancy test dared let us hope. The long-scheduled appointment was cancelled – like all other non-urgent medical treatment.

While it felt like a safety net had been taken away, the fact I’d conceived naturally again at that moment felt serendipitous, especially since I’d been on the waiting list for IVF both times that I conceived.

I knew from the fourth week of pregnancy that something wasn’t right. I

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