Johnson

medicine

DVIDS – News – I Am Navy Medicine: Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW/AW) Anthony Johnson


When U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Ronald J. Place, Defense Health Agency (DHA) director called on Naval Hospital Bremerton (NHB), little did a newly arrived Navy petty officer realize he would be front and center during the visit.

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (Surface Warfare and Aviation Warfare qualified) Anthony Johnson was selected by his directorate to be recognized by the visiting DHA director for his dependable work on the job and his leadership efforts guiding junior Sailors.

“It was an honor to even be recognized with the short amount of time I had been onboard. I was not aware and was definitely caught by surprise when told to report immediately after completing my Basic Life Support instructor course that day. I love knowing that even if nothing is being said around you, your Chain of Command is always paying close attention and recognizing the hard work and effort we all put in daily,” said Johnson, who was hand selected to assist NHB’s Healthcare Benefits operations and Referral Management Center in helping service members and their families navigate enrollment complexities, electronic health record MHS GENESIS registration and coordination of care needs.

“I tried to learn as much as possible to become a valuable asset to the Healthcare Operations Department and Referral Management Center,” Johnson said, helping conduct daily primary care manager (PCM) assignments and management of patient empanelment for 37 PCMs with approximately 33,800 patients.

He also assisted in coordinating and updating TRICARE enrollment and benefits for more than 7,000 Sailors assigned in the Pacific Northwest, along with handling counseling and management of billing concerns, coordinating virtual appointments and serving as a liaison between NHB and claim(s) advisors.

Johnson is currently the leading petty officer of the Multi-Service Unit managing14 enlisted Sailors in support of nine nurses.

The added responsibility and increased reliability is part of the path that Johnson has followed from Gulfport, Miss. to Atlanta, Ga. where he graduated from Stone Mountain High School in 2001. After time spent unhappily working in construction as a welder, he chose to pursue his interest in medicine, drawing inspiration from his mother in doing so.

“My mother dealt with medical issues for many years of my life since middle school. I always wanted to know the why and the how this medicine or that medicine works, or what is causing the symptoms, how to treat it, etc.,” explained Johnson. “I am the oldest of three boys raised by a single parent, who battled cancer since I was 12 years old, which grew my interest in medicine. Plus, I like helping people in need anytime I can.”

“I kept good grades, played sports in school, but never knew what I wanted to do until later in life when I decided to go after my interest in medicine,” continued Johnson. “I have a daughter who’s growing so fast on me, recently turning 14 years old in October and wants to become a pediatrician. I hope to continue in the rate that I love until

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medicine

Sports Medicine Market 2020 Analysis – Stryker, CONMED Corporation, Johnson & Johnson Services, Bird & Cronin

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 06, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
Global Sports Medicine Market is expected to rise from its initial estimated value of USD 19.45 billion in 2018 to an estimated value of USD 37.35 billion by 2026, registering a CAGR of 8.5% in the forecast period of 2019-2026. This rise in market value can be attributed to the increasing incidences of sports injuries.

Global Sports Medicine Market research report showcases thorough insights about the Orthopedic Devices industry which are based on business intelligence. To bring about a supreme expertise of the best market opportunities into their applicable markets, businesses can take up this market report. The market report offers market potential for each geological region based on the growth rate, macroeconomic parameters, consumer buying patterns, their inclinations for particular product and market demand and supply scenarios.

Download exclusive PDF sample report @ https://databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-sports-medicine-market

Global Sports Medicine Market By Product Type (Orthobiologics (Bone Graft Substitutes, Viscosupplementation, BMC, PRP), Surgical Devices (Plates and Screws), Arthroscopy Devices, Orthopedic Braces and Supports), Body Area (Knee, Hip, Shoulder & Elbow, Foot & Ankle, Wrist & Hand), Application (Knee Injuries, Shoulder Injuries, Foot and Ankle Injuries, Elbow and Wrist Injuries, Back and Spine Injuries, Hip and Groin Injuries), End Users (Orthopedic Clinics, Hospitals, Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Others), Geography (North America, South America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa) – Industry Trends & Forecast to 2026

Few of the major competitors currently working in the sports medicine market are

Arthrex, Inc. (Germany),

Smith & Nephew (UK),

DePuy Synthes (US),

Stryker (US),

CONMED Corporation (US),

Johnson & Johnson Services (US),

Bird & Cronin (USA),

Zimmer Biomet (US),

Anika Therapeutics, Inc. (US),

Ossur (Europe),

Breg, Inc. (US),

Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. (US),

DJO Global, Inc. (US),

Medtronic (Ireland),

GENERAL ELECTRIC (US),

Ceterix Orthopaedics (USA),

KFx Medical LLC. (US),

MedShape, Inc. (USA),

NuVasive, Inc. (US),

Flexion Therapeutics Inc. (US)

Market Definition: Global Sports Medicine Market

Sport Medicines can be defined as a medical branch which is deals with diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the injuries or illness of athletics or sportsman. Sports medicines play an initial and important part in the sports.

According to US centers for diseases control, around 10 % of kids and teen participating in the sports suffer include minor or major type of injury and majority of the sports injury occur during 12-16 yr of age. Sports like Football and baseball has the highest rate of injury. Beside this lack of safety and carelessness during practice or game is the major reason for occurrence of the sports injuries.

Market Drivers

  • Increasing adoption of arthroscopic surgeries, this act as driver to the market.
  • Continuous influx of new products and treatment modalities, this act as driver to the market.

Market Restraints

  • Unfavorable reimbursement strategies, this significant act as market restraints.
  • Inappropriate administration and guidelines pertaining to sports medicine, this significant act as market restraints.

Key Developments in the Market:

  • In November 2018, Colfax Corporation announced
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fitness

For the health of the nation, shouldn’t Johnson’s medical fitness for office be scrutinised? | Boris Johnson

Just six words, Doctor Who said, would be enough to bring down the unprincipled prime minister Harriet Jones. “Don’t you think she looks tired?”

Would it work on a man? Time to find out. “I have read a lot of nonsense recently, about how my own bout of Covid has somehow robbed me of my mojo,” Boris Johnson said in his party conference speech. Was he thinking of the Daily Telegraph, where he appeared“strangely out of sorts”, or of the protracted lament by a former fan, the Spectator’s Toby Young: “What on earth happened to the freedom-loving, twinkly-eyed, Rabelaisian character I voted for?” Young cited one theory, “that the disease actually damaged his brain in some way”.

Covid-19 damage featured again in a Times report detailing the exhaustion of a miserable and forgetful prime minister, who was also struggling with his latest infant, whose exact age recently escaped him. “Physically, I think Covid has had huge impact, definitely,” a source said.

“Of course,” Johnson told conference, “this is self-evident drivel, the kind of seditious propaganda that you would expect from people who don’t want this government to succeed.” This seems unnecessarily harsh on some recently prized supporters, yet more unkind to the elderly huntsman Sir Humphry Wakefield, father-in-law of Dominic Cummings, who reportedly said that Johnson is so unwell he will step down in months and should not have gone back to work early because you’d never do that with a horse.

Johnson added, presumably for the benefit of the imaginary seditious propagandists to whom, in dreams, he shows scant mercy: “I could refute these critics of my athletic abilities in any way they want: arm-wrestle, leg-wrestle, Cumberland wrestle, sprint-off, you name it.” And if protecting the population in a pandemic ultimately came down to the prime minister’s victory in next summer’s Lakeland Games, while a non-catastrophic Brexit depended upon the physical humbling of Michel Barnier in a series of tap-room challenges, hopefully excluding the more cerebral skittles or darts, that might indeed have been one of Johnson’s more impressive performances since, well, maybe that time he identified as the Incredible Hulk?

Alas, the most convincing rebuttal of unkind post-Covid-19 “Don’t you think Johnson looks tired/sick/thick/dishevelled/shifty/dandruffy/unRabelaisian” commentary is the one line Johnson can’t deploy: what the hell did you think he was like before?

As it is, Johnson’s affirmation of undiminished mojo seems to have been roughly as effective as reports of Donald Trump’s alleged plan to prove his potency by ripping off his shirt to reveal a Superman T-shirt. Like Trump’s accompanying protestations of perfect health and eternal youth, the (unrealised) stunt only added to his critics’ case for invoking the 25th amendment, which allows Congress to rule a president unfit for office. Regular medicals, even if these duly descended into farce under Trump, also mean that, at least in theory, US politics legitimises public interest in a leader’s physical and intellectual fitness for the job.

However idiotic, Johnson’s boasting about Hulk-level athleticism suggests a measure of respect

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health

Doubts over ‘rapid turnaround’ Covid tests pledged by Johnson

The “rapid turnaround” coronavirus tests the prime minister announced on Saturday are not approved for the public to interpret themselves without an expert’s help and so will not provide results in the promised 15 minutes, the Guardian has learned.



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: WPA/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: WPA/Getty Images

Boris Johnson’s briefing about this week’s national lockdown in England included the promise of a mass rollout of “tests that you can use yourself to tell whether or not you are infectious and get the result within 10 to 15 minutes”, which would be made available at universities and across whole cities.

He said the army would be deployed to roll out the “many millions of cheap, reliable and above all rapid turnaround tests” everywhere they were needed.

Three of these rapid antigen tests, called lateral flow tests, have passed an assessment by Porton Down with Oxford University. The government has bought one of them. The health secretary, Matt Hancock, announced the government had signed a deal for 20 million, from the company Innova Tried and Tested, on 19 October.

But the Innova tests are not for people without symptoms, such as university students or people wanting to get on a plane or go to the theatre. They are designed for people who already have Covid symptoms. And the devices, which look like a pregnancy test, are intended to be read by a healthcare professional.

The company is clear about their limitations on the instructions for use, which can be found on its website. The tests analyse throat and nose swabs “from individuals who are suspected of Covid-19 by their healthcare provider, within the first five days of the onset of symptoms”. The test is designed for use by trained lab and healthcare staff, it says.



Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: Boris Johnson announced the promise of a mass rollout of the tests, to be made available at universities and across cities.


© Photograph: WPA/Getty Images
Boris Johnson announced the promise of a mass rollout of the tests, to be made available at universities and across cities.

Johnson hopes the tests will help show the way out of the pandemic. They will be deployed in a wide range of situations, he said, “from helping women to have their partners with them in labour wards when they’re giving birth, to testing whole towns and even whole cities.

“The army has been brought in to work on the logistics and the programme will begin in a matter of days, working with local communities, local government, public health directors and organisations of all kinds to help people discover whether or not they are infectious, and then immediately to get them to self-isolate and to stop the spread.”

Prof Jon Deeks from Birmingham University and a member of a working group of the Royal Statistical Society, which is looking at coronavirus tests, said they were not ready for this type of use.

“At the moment, if you were bought this test, you would not be using it for this purpose,” he told the Guardian.

Lateral flow tests are now being offered to students at two universities – Durham and De Montfort – in

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health

Johnson & Johnson to test coronavirus vaccine in children

Pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson has plans to begin testing its coronavirus vaccine on children, according to Reuters

Reuters reported on Friday the company soon plans to test the experimental vaccine candidate on people aged 12 to 18. 


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“We plan to go into children as soon as we possibly can, but very carefully in terms of safety,” Jerald Sadoff, senior advisor with Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine division, said during a meeting held by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Friday, according to Reuters. 

Sadoff said the company also has plans to test the vaccine in children younger than 12 if it’s shown to be safe among those 12 to 18. 

Most COVID-19 vaccine trials are focused on whether the shots are safe and effective in adults. Pfizer, which has manufactured one of the four vaccine candidates currently in phase three trials in the U.S., recently started testing its vaccine candidate in children. 

While far fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults, they can still become infected with the virus and spread it around to others. 

Johnson & Johnson kicked off phase three trials of its vaccine last month, aiming to enroll 60,000 participants. The company had to pause the trial earlier this month after a participant suffered a stroke. An independent committee investigated the incident and determined the incident was not related to the vaccine and the trial resumed this week. 

It’s not unusual for some participants to become ill during large scale vaccine trials and most resume shortly after they’re put on pause so cases can be evaluated for safety.


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health

After pausing for safety concerns, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson have resumed their U.S. vaccine trials.

Late-stage coronavirus vaccine trials run by AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson have resumed in the United States after the companies said Friday that serious illnesses in a few volunteers appeared not to be related to the vaccines.

Federal health regulators gave AstraZeneca the green light after a six-week pause, concluding there was no evidence the experimental vaccine had directly caused neurological side effects reported in two participants. The AstraZeneca news was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

Johnson & Johnson said that its trial, which had been on pause for 11 days, would restart after a company investigation determined that a “serious medical event” in one study volunteer had “no clear cause.” To maintain the integrity of the trial, the company said, it did not check whether the volunteer received the vaccine or the placebo.

Dr. Luciana Borio, a former acting chief scientist at the Food and Drug Administration, welcomed the announcements, citing the urgent need for multiple vaccines to remain in the race for a product that could protect the global population from the coronavirus, which has already killed more than a million people worldwide.

“The demand for safe and effective Covid vaccines exceeds any single manufacturer’s production capacity,” Dr. Borio said. “We really need several in the field.”

An F.D.A. spokesperson declined to comment on Friday afternoon.

AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson are two of the four companies now in late-stage clinical trials in the U.S. for experimental coronavirus vaccines. Both companies are using adenoviruses, which typically cause harmless colds. The adenovirus is engineered so that it can chauffeur a coronavirus gene into human cells.

Their two high-profile competitors, Moderna and Pfizer, also in advanced trials, are instead using a technology based on genetic material known as mRNA. Delivered into human cells, the mRNA prompts the production of coronavirus proteins, triggering an immune response.

AstraZeneca moved swiftly into clinical trials, enrolling thousands of volunteers for its vaccine trials around the world in countries including Brazil, India, South Africa and Britain. A large, late-stage trial kicked off in the United States at the end of August. But all the trials were halted days later, on Sept. 6. A volunteer who had received the vaccine in the United Kingdom reportedly experienced symptoms of transverse myelitis, or inflammation of the spinal cord, triggering a global pause to the company’s efforts.

The incident sparked some concern among experts, who noted that a similar adverse neurological event, reported months ago, had occurred in another vaccinated volunteer. While this earlier event prompted its own pause in AstraZeneca’s trials, an independent safety board ultimately determined it was unrelated to the vaccine, allowing studies to resume.

Following the second AstraZeneca halt in September, trials abroad rapidly resumed in most countries. But the American hiatus persisted, with few details released as to why.

According to two vaccine experts familiar with the situation who were not authorized to discuss it publicly, the F.D.A. did not directly tie the vaccine to the two neurological illnesses, although it could

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health

AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson to resume COVID-19 vaccine trials as U.S. daily cases top 71,000

On Friday, both AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson announced that their coronavirus vaccine trials are set to resume in the U.S. after hitting pause when volunteers became sick. The Food and Drug Administration gave the green light after investigations found no link between those cases and the vaccine.

The announcement comes as the U.S. recorded more than 71,000 coronavirus cases on Thursday, which is the highest single-day increase since July, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University. A total of 41 states are reporting an increase in average new cases, and 15 states have reported record hospitalizations in the last week.

“This really does become a moment where all Americans have to recognize that each of us individually has a responsibility if we want to turn this around,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

In hot spot Wisconsin, new cases are up nearly 40% compared to two weeks ago. Wisconsin resident Ava Pennicuik, 15, is still suffering from hot flashes and extreme fatigue three months after recovering from COVID-19.

“I still feel sick sometimes. Some days are good and then some days aren’t,” said Pennicuik. “Like one day I’ll have a really bad day and also super dizzy and tired, and I’ll have to take a nap, and the other day, like, I can just do stuff, like, normally.”

The latest data from researchers at the University of Washington says wearing face masks in public could save nearly 130,000 lives in the U.S. this fall and winter.

Katelyn Evans, 16, became the first teen to get an injection as part Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine study at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the Associated Press reported. It’s part of a push to safely inoculate school-age children.  

“I figured, you know, the more people they test, the more information they get and the sooner they can put out a vaccine to keep everyone safe,” said Evans.

Since the pandemic began, more than half a million American children have been infected with COVID-19. While vaccine trials continue to move forward, the first shots are unlikely to be recommended for kids. Vaccines can’t be given to children unless they’ve been tested in their age group, the AP reported.

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health

Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine trials set to resume

The AstraZeneca vaccine trial, on hold in the United States since early September, also got the greenlight Friday to restart from the Food and Drug Administration, according to a company statement.

When a potential adverse event occurs during a clinical trial, the testing is typically stopped so that an independent data and safety monitoring board can thoroughly investigate and determine whether the problem was likely related to the vaccine. Rules around clinical trials and patient privacy usually restrict details from being released, but the tremendous scrutiny of the coronavirus vaccine trials has led many experts to call for greater transparency in disclosing and explaining the reasons for such halts.

In the Johnson & Johnson trial, which was paused on Oct. 12, a man who received a vaccination suffered a stroke that may have been triggered by an infection. To conclude it was not likely to be related to the shot, investigators probed not only the medical details of the event, but also examined a safety database of 100,000 people who have received vaccines that use the same underlying technology.

The investigation found “no clear cause” of the incident, according to a company statement. It also found no evidence the vaccine triggered the event, the details of which were not disclosed by the company. The independent board that monitors the trial recommended lifting the pause.

“With the information which we gathered to date and the information from external experts, the company found no evidence the vaccine candidate caused it,” Paul Stoffels, chief scientific officer of Johnson & Johnson said in an interview. He did not offer any details of the illness, citing patient privacy.

The company is testing the only vaccine that aims to protect people with a single shot; other prospective vaccines require a return visit and second shot three to four weeks after the first to trigger a protective immune response.

It was the second late-stage vaccine trial put on hold in recent weeks; the vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford was halted on Sept. 6 after a British participant developed a neurological problem. While the AstraZeneca study had resumed in the rest of the world, it did not get clearance to restart in the U.S. until Friday.

AstraZeneca spokeswoman Michele Meixell did not provide further information on the illness, but said the FDA reviewed data from the trials running around the world before concluding it was safe to restart. She said the company was adding a new expert panel “to provide advice on diagnosis and causality assessment of neurological events,”in addition to continuing standard company oversight and the independent data and safety committee.

Pausing and unpausing clinical trials happens routinely, and experts have said that the public should be confident the process worked as intended to protect the health and safety of participants.

“We see this all the time during clinical research,” said Carlos del Rio, an infectious diseases physician at Emory University School of Medicine. “As long as the data and safety monitoring

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health

Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine trial will resume after participant’s stroke is deemed unrelated

The Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine trial, paused due to an unexplained illness in a participant, will resume very soon. An independent committee investigated the case of a man in the trial who suffered a stroke and concluded it was not related to the vaccine, according to two individuals familiar with the trial who spoke on the condition of anonymity.



a sign on the side of a road: Signs direct volunteers for a coronavirus vaccine trial at a trailer compound in National City, California in early October. (REUTERS/Mike Blake)


© Mike Blake/Reuters
Signs direct volunteers for a coronavirus vaccine trial at a trailer compound in National City, California in early October. (REUTERS/Mike Blake)

The study, the only late-stage human test of a coronavirus vaccine that requires just a single shot, was paused by Johnson & Johnson on Oct. 12. It was the second late-stage trial to pause; testing of the vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford has been on hold in the United States since early September after a a British participant developed a neurological problem.

Moncef Slaoui, the head of Operation Warp Speed, told Bloomberg that both trials could resume as early as this week, pending clearance from the Food and Drug Administration.

When an adverse event occurs during a clinical trial, the testing is typically stopped so that an independent data safety and monitoring board can thoroughly investigate and determine whether the problem was likely related to the vaccine. Rules around clinical trials and patient privacy restrict specific details of adverse events from being released, but the tremendous scrutiny of the coronavirus vaccine trials has led many experts to call for greater transparency in disclosing and explaining the reasons behind trial pauses.

In the Johnson & Johnson trial, a man who received a vaccination suffered a stroke that may have been triggered by an infection.

To conclude the event was not related to the vaccination, investigators probed not only the medical details of the event, but also examined a safety database of 100,000 people who have received vaccines that use the same underlying technology.

Johnson & Johnson spokesman Jake Sargent declined to comment.

The company is testing is the only vaccine that aims to protect people with a single shot; other prospective vaccines require a return visit and second shot three to four weeks after the first to trigger a protective immune response.

The vaccine is being tested in as many as 60,000 volunteers from Peru to South Africa.

Read more:

Unprecedented vaccine trials on track to begin delivering results

A single-shot coronavirus vaccine from Johnson & Johnson will be tested in 60,000 people

Britain to infect healthy volunteers with the coronavirus in vaccine challenge trials

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health

Magic Johnson And Cigna Team Up To Improve Minority Healthcare

LOS ANGELES, CA — Magic Johnson and health insurance giant Cigna have teamed up to fight health disparities in POC communities within Los Angeles. The pair launched an initiative to support minority and female-owned businesses, by providing customized health care plans for issues that disproportionately affect people of color.

The initiative will focus on health issues such as asthma, heart disease, diabetes and high-risk pregnancies. Cigna will also invest $3 million in local charities working to improve health equity in Los Angeles.

“Minority and women entrepreneurs and business owners are vital to creating a strong economy and vibrant communities — and we need to do even more to support them right now,” Johnson said. “It’s important for these businesses to survive and be able to employ Black, Hispanic and other employees of color, while offering benefits to combat the health disparities that have taken a toll on our communities. Together with Cigna, we are providing the tools and information needed to improve the health and productivity of their workforce.”

Numerous studies have shown how the coronavirus pandemic has hit Black and Brown communities much harder than others. According to the California Department of Public Health, 48% of people who died from coronavirus were Latino, despite the community being only 38% of the state’s population.

“Today’s intersection of health, economic and racial crises motivated us to take definitive action to partner with these small and mid-size businesses by improving the health and productivity of their workforce — many of whom are from underserved communities,” said Mike Triplett, president of Cigna’s U.S. Commercial business. ‘We are excited to team up with the legendary Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson to bring our new initiative to the market.”

Specialized plans include access to local providers who excel in treating underserved communities, virtual care options and home delivery, and whole-person health services.

City News Service and Kenan Draughorne contributed to this report.

This article originally appeared on the Los Angeles Patch

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