Job

dentist

Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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dentist

‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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fitness

Free fitness classes for anyone who’s lost their job or income

J

ust because you’ve been made redundant, you shouldn’t have to give up your daily dose of endorphins. In fact, that living room HIIT class has never been more needed for those who’ve lost their jobs or homes from the fallout of Covid-19. 

Thankfully, London’s top fitness heroes have come to the rescue, offering free workouts for frontline workers, job seekers and struggling artists amid lockdown 2.0. 

From BLOK gym’s complimentary online membership for out-of-work creatives to Frame’s free hero hotline, these are the studios offering free fitness support for those who need it most.

BLOK fitness subscription

(

BLOK fitness subscription

/ Andy Vowles )

The platform offers more than 170  on-demand video classes, from yoga to HIIT to boxing to dance, with new content released every week. Each week, there are also 60 live classes. 

Co-Founder and CEO of BLOK, Ed Stanbury says: “BLOKtv is more than just a temporary solution to lockdown – it’s an online community for creative thinkers who want to maintain a healthy mind and body. Community has always been at the heart of BLOK, and it’s our aim  to provide a platform which both our instructors and creative communities can really feel part of.

“As we continue through the second lockdown, it feels like now more than ever we need to keep our community moving. We believe that fitness fuels creativity, allowing people to learn new skills, build strength, flexibility, and ultimately have fun. BLOK is not just about getting fitter, it should make you feel better in every part of your life.”

PureGym

(

Pure Gym

/ Puregym )

It features over 400 different workouts of various levels, classes and advice to help anyone maintain both physical and mental health during this second lockdown. Just download the PureGym app from the Apple App Store or Google Play to get started.

Stephen Rowe, Chief Marketing Officer of PureGym, says: “As the days shorten and the weather turns, exercising outdoors isn’t feasible for the majority of people. Therefore, we have made the decision to make the PureGym app and the hundreds of workouts available on the platform free, to help as many people as we can, whether you go to PureGym, to another gym or no gym at all, this app is now for everyone and we hope it’ll help people to keep fit throughout November and beyond”.

Frame

(

Frame

/ Frame )

Adults who participate in daily physical activity are 20 to 30 per cent less likely to experience depression so fizzy fitness chain Frame has introduced a hero hotline to offer its daily dose of endorphins for

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health

Covid leaves some with medical bills, job insecurity, lingering isssues

Welcome to the Covid Economy, CNBC Make It’s deep dive into how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting all areas of our lives, from food to housing, health care to small business. We’re focusing on North Carolina, a swing state that has seen rapid economic growth — and growing inequality — since the last recession to learn how residents are weathering the economic consequences of this once-in-a-lifetime health crisis.

Ann only let her guard down for an afternoon. After months of being careful and following social distancing guidelines, she got together with a friend over the Fourth of July weekend. The next day, that friend let her know they were feeling sick. Four days after that, Ann began developing symptoms, too. 

An HR manager based in the Charlotte, North Carolina, area, Ann, who agreed to speak to CNBC Make It on the condition that she be identified only by her middle name to protect her privacy, scheduled a Covid-19 test on July 15. She received a positive result two days later. 

It’s been more than four months, and Ann’s still struggling to fully recover from the virus. But it’s not just her health that’s been impacted. She’s had to take an unpaid leave of absence from work, and despite having health insurance, she’s worried about the mounting medical bills.

During the nearly three weeks that Ann suffered from the worst effects of Covid-19, she was mainly isolated at home. “There was an entire week that I had to lie on my stomach for hours just to breathe without a crushing pain in my chest,” Ann says. “The vomiting and diarrhea were so unyielding that one day I contemplated just sitting in the tub instead of going back and forth to the toilet.”

At one point, Ann’s symptoms were so serious, she did go to the emergency room. Fortunately, her hospital stay was short, and she never had to be put on a ventilator. But even after the worst of her symptoms passed, her life has yet to return to normal. One of the rising number of so-called “long haulers,” Ann is still feeling the ongoing effects of the virus. 

“It’s just so weird to me to be someone who is healthy and in their thirties to have something just completely ravage you so hard that it affects every organ in your body,” Ann says. 

Costs of Covid-19 vary dramatically and can go beyond just medical bills

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health

First responder and apparent covid long-hauler fighting to keep job

My symptoms have gotten worse and are typical of what is being reported for covid-19 “long-haulers” — recurring fever, debilitating fatigue, inability to concentrate, headache, dizziness, body aches and more. I’m being evaluated for chronic fatigue syndrome, but my doctor and other specialists I have seen are convinced that my condition is a direct result of the unidentified viral infection earlier in the year.

My employer has granted me short-term disability. When it runs out, I will be placed on long-term disability at 60 percent of my current salary. My employment will be terminated, and I will have to join my spouse’s health insurance plan.

I realize I’m fortunate compared to those without access to benefits or insurance. But this illness is devastating enough without the stress of potentially losing my career of 15+ years. If I was exposed to the coronavirus at work and it is the cause of my debilitating illness, are there other routes I should explore, such as workers’ compensation? How problematic is it that I never actually tested positive? What can I do to retain my job or financial security when I finally recover?

Karla: Two red-hot ironies that sum up the American condition:

1. You have dedicated years of your life to performing a job that may have derailed your career and life as you know it — and yet one of your main concerns is staying gainfully employed.

2. Despite devastating illness, you consider yourself lucky to have access to financial support and health-care coverage thanks to your employment and your marital status.

I’m not criticizing you, by any means. I’m lamenting a state of existence that demands so much yet compels people to feel grateful for so little.

Elaine Weiss, lead policy analyst for income security and a specialist on workers’ compensation at the National Academy of Social Insurance, sees your story as an example of “why working in this country … for so many people is so precarious.” The coronavirus pandemic has illuminated just how “worker protection systems are inadequate,” says Weiss, and how vulnerable we all are.

Workers’ compensation is designed to provide no-fault support for people injured or sickened because of their work. But aside from known occupational diseases, such as black lung in miners, it’s generally difficult to claim workers’ comp for illness. As Weiss and other NASI colleagues discuss in a recent report, covid-19 in particular is hard to pin down as job-related because it’s highly contagious, common outside the workplace, and has a long latency period. But some categories of workers have a clear and disproportionate risk of exposure through their jobs.

For this reason, some states have begun lowering the burden of proof for certain categories of workers diagnosed with coronavirus so they can qualify for workers’ comp. These presumptions vary widely by state; some cover only front-line health-care professionals, while others include educators, warehouse workers, retail employees, meatpackers and other vulnerable groups. Of course, the NASI report notes, the more people these policies cover,

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