Important

fitness

How important is being flexible? It depends on your fitness goals

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No need to aspire to a cat’s level of flexibility.


Harris Hui/Getty Images

People in pursuit of fitness often allow flexibility to slip by the wayside to chase after other goals, such as building muscle, losing weight and improving health markers. We only have so much time to exercise, after all, and flexibility training doesn’t provide the same benefits as running or lifting weights

While everyone needs a bit of flexibility, you may be surprised — and happy — to learn that you don’t need to stretch as much as you think. In this article, you’ll learn the benefits of flexibility (and the dangers of inflexibility), plus how flexible you really need to be. 

Read more: Should you pay someone to help you stretch? I tried it to find out

While you certainly can work towards contorting yourself like the woman above, most of us never need to be that flexible.

How important is flexibility?

Flexibility is important — to an extent. It has been overhyped and glamorized in the fitness industry, however, and it’s become yet another seemingly unattainable fitness goal because contortionists on Instagram would have you believe that flexibility means bending yourself into a human scorpion. 

If you are a nonbendy person, you’ll be happy to know you never, ever need to be that flexible unless you really want to. Everyone does need some level of flexibility, however, to avoid pain and injuries. 

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Amanda Capritto/CNET

How flexible should you be?

Not to sound vague, but everyone should be flexible enough, and “enough” means different things to everyone. As a personal trainer, I’ve honestly found that this is the best way to put it. Everyone should be flexible enough to support their lifestyle and goals. 

Not everyone needs the ability to do the splits, fold in half or contort their shoulders. Training for those feats is a waste of time if you just need to go for a run, drop into a squat or lift weights above your head. Common exercises do require flexibility, but not to the same degree as the splits. 

Your level of flexibility should reflect your physical pursuits and, like everything else in fitness, flexibility is fluid and can change over time to reflect new goals. 

You can also look at this from a daily functionality angle. Everyone should be flexible enough to complete activities of daily living without pain. Putting on socks, tying shoes, putting dishes away on high shelves and getting into your car all require some level of flexibility. If you’re not flexible enough to do these things without pain, it’s definitely time to start stretching

Benefits of flexibility 

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Your stretching routine should reflect the activities you want to do in life. 


Amanda Capritto/CNET

It’s so easy to skip the cool-down portion of your workout, but dedicating a few minutes to stretching after you exercise can significantly improve your flexibility over time.

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fitness

Kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI — ScienceDaily

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise — not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests — such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch — were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation — whether the child wanted to participate in PE — nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids to do something. Take them to places, get them moving, and let them try different things themselves.
  • Variety is key. Introduce children to multiple ways they
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fitness

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
Children get active outside UGA’s McPhaul Child Development Lab. Credit: Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise—not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests—such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch— were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI
Physical activity during PE in school is a good indicator of students’ activity after school, according to new research. Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation—whether the child wanted to participate in PE—nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids
Read More
fitness

Apple Watch Series 6 Beats Garmin’s Fenix 6 Pro For Fitness Tracking In One Important Way

A Garmin runner’s watch like the Fenix 6 Pro Solar is an obvious choice if you want a wearable to track runs, walks and bike rides. But does it really do the job better than an Apple Watch Series 6?

I decided to test these watches’ heart rate sensors in the context of a run. An Apple Watch on one wrist, a Garmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar on the other, and a Wahoo Tickr HR strap around the chest, acting as a control for this not-quite-scientific test.

Here are the results over a roughly 7km run, one dotted with breaks and slow-downs to see how the trackers cope with sharp changes in effort. The Garmin is the red line, the Apple Watch Series 6 the blue line and the Wahoo Tickr the green.

The most obvious fault here is the Wahoo Tickr chest strap’s. Or, to be fair, my own. Its readings are all patchy and intermittent at the first increase in pace, most likely because the strap wasn’t quite tight enough to start.

However, it is otherwise the most accurate of the three. And I’ve left the first few minutes of tracking in this graph to highlight the main wearable takeaway.

The Apple Watch Series 6 starts off from a much better position than the Garmin Fenix 6 Pro, whose results are too high. This is a common observation of Garmins and wearables in general: their HR tracking algorithms tend to assume your heart rate will be far above your resting rate as soon as you begin tracking an exercise.

If you start the session as you warm-up, it will not be. The Apple Watch Series 6’s readings are very accurate from the first seconds onwards.

This issue with lower heart rate readings continues throughout the run. In each decrease in pace, or outright stop in the case of the deepest dip in the graph, the Apple Watch Series 6 tightly matches the lowest reading recorded by the Wahoo Tickr chest strap. But the Garmin’s are all routinely slightly higher.

MORE FROM FORBESGarmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar: Check Out Its 48 Exercise Modes And Fitness Features

The Garmin Fenix 6 Pro shows significantly higher readings during the cool-down too, aside from an aberrant blip at the end where the recorded rate drops, and then compensates with an artificially high peak.

Apple’s Watch Series 6 only failed to keep up, slightly, with the Tickr when I went from running to sitting on a bench, to cause a very steep fall in heart rate. The Apple and Garmin’s falls are similarly cliff-like, but not as steep as the Tickr’s.

The Apple Watch Series 6’s heart rate hardware is superb, obviating the need for a chest strap, for most people. There is another side to this story, though.

To

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dentist

Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist



Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist


© Provided by News18
Brushing Teeth Is As Important as Washing Hands to Prevent Covid-19, Says British Dentist

It seems face masks, hand sanitisers, and social distancing are not enough to prevent the spread of coronavirus according to a British dentist.

Dentistry Professor Martin Addy of the University of Bristol has called for toothbrushing to be considered equally important as hand washing. In an interview to British daily The Telegraph, professor explained that toothpaste contains the same detergents as those found in soap and hand wash soaps, which could help prevent the coronavirus from making itself into your mouth.

A report by Mirror quoted The Telegraph who interviewed the professor saying that the antimicrobial action of toothpaste in the mouth stays for three to five hours and, thereby would reduce the viral load in saliva or infection by viruses entering the mouth.

He further suggested that people should brush their teeth before going out and should increase the number of times they were brushing their teeth. He said the timing of tooth brushing should be focused when a person is about to go out of their homes into a public place.

The British professor is quite serious when it comes to brushing the teeth.

In April this year he even wrote a letter published in the British Dental Journal questioning the dental community why the profession has not been promoting oral hygiene, through toothbrushing, as a preventive approach to coronavirus.

As the World Health Organisation, governments across the world urged citizens to wash their hands frequently Professor Addy said that the general recommendation to toothbrush with toothpaste for two minutes twice a day should be reinforced by the dental profession, the media and the government and its advisors.

He said that it should not be assumed that such oral hygiene practices are already the norm, especially for those individuals who coincidentally are most at risk of contracting Covid-19.

Even though there has been no research which proves how exactly tooth brushing prevents the virus it should be followed as a part of basic hygiene nonetheless.

Source Article

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