III

medicine

Greenwich LifeSciences, Inc. Announces Partnership with Baylor College of Medicine for its Planned Phase III Clinical Trial

Greenwich LifeSciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GLSI) (the “Company”), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of GP2, an immunotherapy to prevent breast cancer recurrences in patients who have previously undergone surgery, today announced the formation of a partnership with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas to act as the lead clinical site for the Company’s upcoming Phase III clinical trial. Professor Mothaffar F. Rimawi has agreed to serve as the Global Principal Investigator of the Phase III clinical trial, and Professor C. Kent Osborne and Professor Rimawi are expected to serve as the first members of the Company’s Clinical Advisory Board for the development of GP2 immunotherapy across all indications and HER2 expressing cancers.

Snehal Patel, CEO of Greenwich LifeSciences, commented, “We are pleased to have entered into this collaboration with such prominent key opinion leaders who are truly committed to evaluating the potential of GP2 immunotherapy. Due to GP2’s safety profile, GP2 immunotherapy may provide clinicians with an option to deescalate treatment of patients by reducing the use of other, more toxic and expensive standard of care treatments. Both Professors Rimawi and Osborne have already introduced us to other breast cancer clinical sites and clinical leaders who have provided input into the design of the upcoming Phase III trial and who have expressed an interest in participating in the Phase III trial as high enrollment sites. In addition, we have also been jointly exploring the addition of both US and European breast cancer cooperative groups to more rapidly expand the clinical team.”

Professor Rimawi added, “We are excited to jointly evaluate the potential of GP2 immunotherapy. We believe that our patients will seek to participate in the upcoming trial as the GP2 Phase IIb clinical trial data suggests that GP2 could be both safe and effective and could be easily administered during standard of care follow-up visits. Our patients are seeking safe preventative treatments that allow them to transition away from the trauma of surgery, trastuzumab-based therapies, other HER2 targeted therapies, chemotherapy, and radiation as they seek to return to normal and healthy lives.”

Professor Osborne commented, “Bringing new alternatives to chemotherapy and improving quality of life for patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer are primary focuses of the Breast Cancer Program. GP2 immunotherapy may represent one such opportunity, and we look forward to collaborating with Greenwich LifeSciences and supporting the planned clinical trial with the resources of both the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Baylor College of Medicine.”

Professor Mothaffar F. Rimawi is board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology, and serves as both Executive Medical Director and Co-Leader of the Breast Cancer Program at the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Professor C. Kent Osborne is board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology, and serves as both the Tina and Dudley Sharp Chair in Oncology and the founding Director of the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center. Professor Osborne is also Professor of Medicine and Molecular and

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health

Soleno Therapeutics Announces Presentation of Body Composition Results from DESTINY PWS, a Phase III Trial of DCCR in Prader-Willi Syndrome

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Nov. 03, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Soleno Therapeutics, Inc. (“Soleno”) (NASDAQ: SLNO), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of rare diseases, today announced presentation of body composition data from the Company’s Phase III trial, DESTINY PWS (C601), evaluating once-daily Diazoxide Choline Controlled Release (DCCR) tablets for patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). The results were presented today by Parisa Salehi, M.D., Clinical Director of the Prader-Willi Syndrome Clinic at Seattle Children’s Hospital, in a late-breaking oral presentation at The Obesity Society’s ObesityWeek® 2020 meeting. Dr. Salehi presented the data on behalf of the DESTINY PWS Investigators.

DESTINY PWS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III study of once daily oral administration of DCCR in 127 PWS patients conducted at 29 sites in the U.S. and U.K. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of DCCR in subjects with genetically-confirmed PWS aged four years and older and weighing between 20 and 134 kg. Patients who completed the double-blind study enrolled in study C602, an ongoing open-label, extension study. Updated top-line results were previously announced in September 2020 that demonstrated DCCR’s beneficial impact on hyperphagia, the predominant symptom of PWS, other behaviors and body composition abnormalities typical of PWS.

Key results for effects on body composition and adipokines following DCCR treatment were presented at ObesityWeek 2020 as follows:

Fat mass and body mass:

  • Significant reductions in fat mass (p=0.0027) were observed after 13 weeks of double-blind treatment
    –  Greater mean reductions in fat mass were observed in those participants weighing more than 100 kg at baseline (placebo-adjusted difference -4.82 kg)

  • Linear exposure-response relationship for fat mass was significant with greater fat loss occurring at higher circulating drug concentrations (p<0.0001)

  • Trend towards increased lean body mass for DCCR compared to placebo (p=0.058)

  • Significant increase in lean body mass/fat mass ratio (p=0.001)

Leptin:

  • Significant reduction in leptin while it increased in placebo-treated subjects (p<0.0001)

  • Linear exposure-response relationship for leptin was significant with greater reductions in leptin occurring at higher circulating drug concentrations (p<0.0001)

  • Reductions in leptin were greater than would be predicted solely by the loss of body fat, suggesting an improvement in leptin sensitivity

Adiponectin:

  • Adiponectin, a cardioprotective hormone, increased in DCCR-treated subjects, but decreased in placebo-treated participants (p<0.0001)

“We are pleased to present further results from the DESTINY PWS study that demonstrate DCCR’s effect on body composition. In the DCCR group compared to placebo, we have observed a significant reduction in fat mass and leptin. Improvements in leptin sensitivity, as suggested by the results, may have an important impact on regulating hyperphagia,” said Dr. Salehi. “The data presented to date show that DCCR has the potential to manage both behavioral and co-morbid metabolic components of PWS.”

“These data represent additional means by which DCCR may address the significant unmet medical needs and the life-threatening comorbidities associated with PWS,” said Anish Bhatnagar, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Soleno Therapeutics. “We remain focused on advancing DCCR as a potential treatment

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health

First-Ever Positive Phase III Trial in Epidermolysis Bullosa

A topical treatment derived from tree bark significantly increased healing of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) lesions versus standard care in an international multicenter clinical trial.

After 45 days of treatment, 41.3% of patients randomized to oleogel-S10 (Filsuvez) had complete wound closure as compared with 28.9% of the control group. A subgroup analysis showed that the beneficial effects were limited to patients with recessive dystrophic, which accounted for almost 80% of the study population.

The wound-healing advantage of oleogel-S10 emerged at about 30 days and persisted out to 90 days, when the proportion of patients with healing became similar in the two treatment groups, reported Dedee Murrell, MD, of the University of New South Wales in Kensington, Australia, during the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology virtual conference.

“The time to event, which is wound healing over 90 days … was not statistically significant overall,” she said. “The wound healing trajectories demonstrated that oleogel-S10 accelerates wound healing in a subset of the wounds. However, as expected, with good wound care, the control group begins to catch up later by 90 days. The difference in the proportion of healed target wounds had narrowed between treatment groups at 90 days, but the control group never overtook the oleogel arm.”

“This is the first time that a phase III trial in EB has met its primary endpoint,” she added.

Background of Development

A rare genetic skin-fragility disorder, EB characteristically emerges as a pattern of recurring healing and break-down wounds, along with chronic slow-healing or nonhealing wounds. The condition has no approved therapy, and standard of care consists of nonadhesive bandages, topical antimicrobial agents, topical steroids, and various unapproved therapies that are not specific for EB, Murrell noted.

The primary active ingredient in oleogel-S10 is betulin, a naturally occurring triterpene found in the bark of certain types of birch trees. Dry betulin extract is mixed with sunflower oil to form a gel, which is applied directly to EB lesions and to the contact surface of bandages. The mechanistic rationale for its use in EB includes evidence that triterpenes help modulate inflammation and are involved in keratinocyte proliferation, migration, and differentiation.

Preliminary clinical research provided evidence of accelerated wound healing in patients with dystrophic EB. The work subsequently led to the international phase III EASE trial. Investigators at 58 sites in 28 countries enrolled 223 patients, primarily with dystrophic EB but also junctional EB or Kindler syndrome. Eligible patients had a partial thickness wound 10-50 cm2 in size, persisting for 21 days to 9 months.

Patients were randomized to oleogel-S10 or control gel, each in addition to standard dressings changed at least once every 4 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who had a first complete closure of a target wound within 45 days. Secondary endpoints included time to wound healing, proportion of target wounds healed within 90 days, incidence and severity of wound infections, change in total body wound burden, change in itching, and adverse events.

Patients ages 4-12 years accounted for

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