Hospitalizations

medicine

Michigan Medicine tightens visitor restrictions as hospitalizations continue to rise

ANN ARBOR, MI – No visitors will be allowed with adult patients in Michigan Medicine hospitals, except when medically necessary, as the health system tries to minimize COVID-19 spread.

Michigan Medicine announced the changes that will go into effect on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Information on exceptions, including end-of-life care, labor and delivery and other situations, can be found here.

“COVID-19 transmission rates continue to climb in the community. Our top priority is the safety of our patients and staff, and to minimize the spread of disease, we need to take this additional step,” said Laraine Washer, M.D., Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology, in a news release.

“We know this is difficult for our patients and their families and friends. But we need to continue to keep our Michigan Medicine facilities safe for all of our patients.”

The latest visitor limitations come in addition to restrictions the health system previously announced, including not allowing visitors with adult emergency department patients; a two-visitor limit for pediatric patients and mask requirement at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital; and no visitor rule for adult patients at Michigan Medicine clinics, unless the patient has a cognitive or physical impairment that requires assistance.

As of Nov. 23, Michigan Medicine reported 103 patients currently admitted that tested positive for COVID-19 – the highest number since late April.

Washer encouraged people to stay home this Thanksgiving and avoid gatherings with those outside your household.

“The best advice to limit risk is to continue to avoid gathering with people outside your household even if it is Thanksgiving. If you are reporting to work, don’t have potlucks or share meals in close proximity with your co-workers: you can’t eat without taking off your mask, and that brief period of not wearing a mask could be enough to open the door to disease spread,” Washer said.

READ MORE:

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

Michigan coronavirus outbreaks increase 45% in 2 weeks

Exhausted in a ‘nightmare’: A look inside a Michigan hospital COVID unit

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Wear masks, Michigan Medicine leaders tell public as hospitalizations surge

ANN ARBOR, MI — Michigan Medicine leaders are calling on the public to not let its guard down as hospitals across the state experience rapid surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

It’s imperative Michigan caregivers stay healthy so they can take care of an expected surge in cases this winter, Marschall Runge, Michigan Medicine CEO and dean of the University of Michigan’s medical school, said in a Thursday, Nov. 18 news conference that also announced a joint nationwide campaign to encourage mask wearing.

Michigan Medicine has joined around 100 of the nation’s top health care systems in the #MaskUp campaign, which urges all Americans to mask up, in an effort to slow the surge of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, Runge said.

A large surge in cases requiring hospitalizations for COVID-19 due to the lack of adherence to mitigation strategies has the potential to overwhelm health systems, said Laraine Washer, Michigan Medicine’s medical director of infection prevention and epidemiology.

“I’m very glad that we at Michigan Medicine are joining with healthcare systems nationwide to encourage the simple behaviors that are proven to work: Mask up, socially distance, wash your hands,” Washer said.

Like many other hospitals across the state, Michigan Medicine is facing short staffing, Runge said, adding the healthcare system is developing a plan to make sure it can provide necessary care.

“Given the widespread community transmission, hospitals are also managing staffing limitations due to employee illness, absences and responsibilities for childcare,” Washer said.

During the past three weeks, Michigan Medicine has seen an increase in COVID-19 patients, Runge said. This week alone, Michigan Medicine had as many as 75 COVID-19 positive patients at one time, with up to 20 of them being critically ill and requiring ICU care, officials said.

“Following the spring and early summer COVID surge — the first wave, so to speak — we resumed care of many non-COVID patients that need hospitalization, and our hospitals are about 90% full as a result,” Runge said. “With that high occupancy, which we did manage pre-COVID, that puts additional strain on our response to the pandemic.”

The health system’s testing capacity is approximately 10,000 COVID-19 tests per week, while its laboratories continue to develop new strategies to implement different types of COVID tests, officials said.

Michigan Medicine’s testing results recently showed about 14% of those tested are testing positive for COVID, well above the 5% mark reported for most of the summer months, Runge said.

“At Michigan Medicine, and all of Michigan’s healthcare providers, we need your help,” Runge said. “To combat a pandemic we need supplies, we need space and most importantly staff.”

The increased hospital capacity is putting a burden on the number of beds, as well as staff and healthcare providers, Runge said. A large surge of cases also carries a risk of challenging the amount of personal protective equipment required to keep healthcare workers safe, health officials said.

The number of confirmed cases in Michigan reached more than 277,800 this week, including 8,190 deaths.

Read More
health

Connecticut’s hospitalizations spike to 381; positivity rate back up to 4.6%

Connecticut’s coronavirus hospitalizations on Election Day spiked up to 381, the highest number of hospitalized patients the state has seen since June 3, according to data released by Gov. Ned Lamont’s office.

The state reported an additional 41 people hospitalized, which is a massive jump compared to recent months. Connecticut hasn’t seen such a large single-day increase in hospitalizations since mid-April, when the state was fighting through the worst of the pandemic’s spring wave.

State officials have acknowledged in recent days and weeks that Connecticut is now in the midst of a second wave of COVID-19. The state’s numbers began rising in early September, when the daily positivity rate jumped above the 1% threshold that it had maintained for most of the late summer.

That rate is still on the rise, and jumped to 4.6% on Tuesday, when the state reported 985 newly identified cases out of a total of 21,230 tests administered.

That daily rate fluctuates fairly widely, but the state’s weekly average rate is on the rise, too, as the state moves deeper into the second wave of COVID-19. Including Tuesday’s rate, the state’s weekly average rate is now 3.6%, which is the highest weekly rate the state has seen since June 6.

Coronavirus-connected deaths are on the rise as well. The state reported Tuesday that an additional seven people have died with the virus.

In the month of August, a total of 33 people in Connecticut died with COVID-19. That number increased to 43 for the month of September, and then to at least 108 for the month of October.

Medical experts have said that Connecticut may continue to see worsening numbers as the state moves into the winter, with the ongoing second wave potentially peaking as late as mid-January.

Across the state, a total of 74,843 people have contracted the virus and 4,634 people have died with it.

Nationwide, more than 9.3 million people have contracted the virus and a total of 232,447 people have died of it, according to the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center.

The state is also expected to release the updated weekly travel advisory on Tuesday evening, however that update had not been released by 7:30 p.m.

Emily Brindley can be reached at [email protected]

———

©2020 The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.)

Visit The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.) at www.courant.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source Article

Read More
health

U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations hit three-month high over 50,000: Reuters tally

By Roshan Abraham and Kavya B

(Reuters) – The number of coronavirus patients in U.S. hospitals breached 50,000 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly three months, as a surge in infections threatens to push the nation’s health care system to the edge of capacity.

Texas reported the highest number of currently hospitalized patients with 5,936, followed by Illinois with 3,594 and California with 3,270 patients, according to a Reuters tally. While California has three times as many people as Illinois, new cases have been the highest per capita in the Midwest.

Nationally, the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients rose over 64% since Oct. 1 to 50,176 on Tuesday, the highest since Aug. 7. The figure is still short of the record 58,370 hospitalizations set on July 22, according to a Reuters tally.

Hospitalizations are a key metric because, unlike case counts, they are not influenced by the number of tests performed. 

As millions of Americans voted in Tuesday’s presidential election, the number of cases in the country surpassed 9.4 million, rising by 1 million in just two weeks. 

On Friday, the United States set a world record by reporting over 100,000 new infections in a single day. 

Southern U.S. states, led by Texas, have the highest number of coronavirus hospitalizations with nearly 20,000 patients or 40% of the national total, followed by the Midwest, West and Northeast.

Hospitals in Wisconsin and Texas have been rushing to find more beds for coronavirus patients, as the state’s medical facilities struggle to keep pace with a surge in new infections. The Texas city of El Paso has converted a convention center into a field hospital to treat the overflow. 

Health experts believe the virus is surging because of private social gatherings, colder temperatures driving people inside, and Americans’ fatigue with COVID-19 restrictions that have now been in place for more than six months.

For every 10,000 people in the United States, over 278 coronavirus cases have been reported and about seven people have died, according to a Reuters analysis. In Europe there have been over 127 cases and nearly four deaths per 10,000 residents.

The White House coronavirus task force warned of a persistent and broad spread of COVID-19 in the western half of the United States and its members urged aggressive mitigation measures. 

(Reporting by Roshan Abraham and Kavya B in Bengaluru; Additional reporting by Shaina Ahluwalia; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Source Article

Read More
health

Hospitalizations in U.S. Hit Highest Level Since Mid-August

The number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 in the U.S. topped 48,000 on Monday, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project, continuing a monthslong increase and hitting the highest point since mid-August as people headed to the polls to vote in the presidential contest.

The rise comes as new confirmed infections are rising across the nation, and public-health officials and epidemiologists worry that the coming holiday season will accelerate the new surge in cases.

In Ohio, hospitalizations once again hit a new high, topping 1,800 for Monday, rising by more than 100 from the previous day, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project. Similar to the U.S. as a whole, the state has seen hospitalizations climb since early October.

Mike Abrams, chief executive and president of the Ohio Hospital Association, said he expected the state’s increase in hospitalizations to continue and is worried about the Thanksgiving holiday, when families will gather around tables across the nation.

“I do think that we aren’t finished setting records on hospitalizations or positives in Ohio,” Mr. Abrams said. He said Tuesday that 68% of the state’s hospital beds are full and 6.8% of those beds are occupied by Covid-19 patients. Of the state’s 4,580 intensive-care unit beds, 10.3% are being used by Covid-19 patients, Mr. Abrams said.

The Ohio Department of Health reported 4,229 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear cautioned that hospitalizations in the state are climbing more quickly.

“We are seeing in certain areas hospital systems becoming taxed,” the Democrat said Tuesday. “If we cannot control the increase, then it is a real possibility that we could face some real concerns with capacity.” Kentucky had 988 hospitalizations for Nov. 2, according to the Covid Tracking Project, the most the project had on record for the state.

For the U.S. overall, Monday’s hospitalization count is the highest since Aug. 11, according to Covid Tracking Project data. The U.S. hit a pandemic high of 59,940 hospitalizations on April 15, that data showed, when New York was bearing the brunt of a surge in coronavirus cases. After hitting a recent low of 28,608 hospitalizations Sept. 20, hospitalizations started to steadily increase around the beginning of October.

The latest increases are more widespread geographically and reaching more remote regions of the nation, which is expected to further strain resources needed for disaster response, said experts in health-care emergency planning. At least a dozen states, including Ohio, saw the numbers of Covid-19 patients in hospitals set a new high Monday, Covid Tracking Project data show.

Hospital stays from the virus have gotten shorter in the midst of advances in Covid-19 treatment, helping to ease the pressure on hospital capacity, but doctors and health-care disaster experts said those improvements aren’t enough to be able to combat the increase in hospitalizations.

Texas reported the most hospitalizations in the country Monday, with more than 5,000, followed by Illinois and California, which both had more than 3,000, and Florida, which had more than 2,000, according to

Read More
health

COVID hospitalizations surge as pandemic enters alarming new phase in U.S.

Americans went to the polls Tuesday under the shadow of a resurging pandemic, with an alarming increase in cases nationwide and the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 reaching record highs in a growing number of states.

While daily infections were rising in all but three states, the surge was most pronounced in the Midwest and Southwest.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and New Mexico all reported record high hospitalizations this week. Nebraska’s largest hospitals started limiting elective surgeries and looked to bring in nurses from other states to cope with the surge. Hospital officials in Iowa and Missouri warned bed capacity could soon be overwhelmed.

The resurgence loomed over candidates and voters, fearful of both the virus itself and the economic toll of any new shutdowns to control its spread. The debate over how far to take economically costly measures has divided a country already sharply polarized over President Donald Trump’s turbulent four years in office.

The infection rate is definitely a leading indicator for hospitalizations, and the hospitalization rate is a leading indicator of mortality.

Meanwhile, Iowa hospital officials warned their facilities and staff could be overwhelmed without serious efforts to curtail the virus spread. The state’s seven-day rolling average of positive cases reached 36.4 percent over the weekend, the third-highest in the nation behind South Dakota and Wyoming, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Hospitalizations reached a record 730 on Monday.

Suresh Gunasekaran, CEO of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said Iowa is entering its third peak, one that is higher than previous ones in May and July. He said his biggest concern is that this peak comes at the beginning of the cold weather season, when the flu and other respiratory conditions typically increase hospitalizations.

“The infection rate is definitely a leading indicator for hospitalizations, and the hospitalization rate is a leading indicator of mortality,” Gunasekaran said.

Related: Pediatric cases now account for 11% of all cases in the U.S., up from 2% in April.

Health officials in Nebraska said hospitalizations have doubled in recent weeks, reaching a record 613 on Sunday.

“No doubt if this trend continues — not just at our hospitals — but every hospital in the state could be at capacity in a very short period of time,” Dr. Cary Ward, chief medical officer for CHI Health’s network of 14 hospitals across eastern Nebraska and western Iowa said during a video call with reporters.

In Missouri, leaders of several rural hospitals raised alarms about bed capacity during a conference call Monday with Republican Gov. Mike Parson, who drew renewed fire from his Democratic election challenger for his refusal to issue a statewide mask mandate. The state health department reported 1,659 hospitalizations statewide, surpassing by 10 the previous record set a day earlier. Among the five additional deaths reported Monday was a 13-year-old boy, the first child under 14 to die from the virus in Missouri.

In Colorado, officials said more residents have been hospitalized with the

Read More
health

Covid hospitalizations surge as virus enters alarming new phase in U.S.

Americans went to the polls Tuesday under the shadow of a resurging pandemic, with an alarming increase in cases nationwide and the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 reaching record highs in a growing number of states.

While daily infections were rising in all but three states, the surge was most pronounced in the Midwest and Southwest.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Iowa, Indiana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and New Mexico all reported record high hospitalizations this week. Nebraska’s largest hospitals started limiting elective surgeries and looked to bring in nurses from other states to cope with the surge. Hospital officials in Iowa and Missouri warned bed capacity could soon be overwhelmed.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

The resurgence loomed over candidates and voters, fearful of both the virus itself and the economic toll of any new shutdowns to control its spread. The debate over how far to take economically costly measures has divided a country already sharply polarized over President Donald Trump’s turbulent four years in office.

Meanwhile, Iowa hospital officials warned their facilities and staff could be overwhelmed without serious efforts to curtail the virus spread. The state’s seven-day rolling average of positive cases reached 36.4 percent over the weekend, the third-highest in the nation behind South Dakota and Wyoming, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Hospitalizations reached a record 730 on Monday.

Suresh Gunasekaran, CEO of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said Iowa is entering its third peak, one that is higher than previous ones in May and July. He said his biggest concern is that this peak comes at the beginning of the cold weather season, when the flu and other respiratory conditions typically increase hospitalizations.

“The infection rate is definitely a leading indicator for hospitalizations, and the hospitalization rate is a leading indicator of mortality,” Gunasekaran said.

Health officials in Nebraska said hospitalizations have doubled in recent weeks, reaching a record 613 on Sunday.

“No doubt if this trend continues — not just at our hospitals — but every hospital in the state could be at capacity in a very short period of time,” Dr. Cary Ward, chief medical officer for CHI Health’s network of 14 hospitals across eastern Nebraska and western Iowa said during a video call with reporters.

In Missouri, leaders of several rural hospitals raised alarms about bed capacity during a conference call Monday with Republican Gov. Mike Parson, who drew renewed fire from his Democratic election challenger for his refusal to issue a statewide mask mandate. The state health department reported 1,659 hospitalizations statewide, surpassing by 10 the previous record set a day earlier. Among the five additional deaths reported Monday was a 13-year-old boy, the first child under 14 to die from the virus in Missouri.

In Colorado, officials said more residents have been hospitalized with the coronavirus than at any time since a peak in April. Flags were flying at half-staff in New Mexico, where death from COVID-19 surpassed 1,000 last week and hospitalizations reached a record 380

Read More
health

Virus hospitalizations surge as pandemic shadows US election

Americans went to the polls Tuesday under the shadow of a resurging pandemic, with an alarming increase in cases nationwide and the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 reaching record highs in a growing number of states.

While daily infections were rising in all but three states, the surge was most pronounced in the Midwest and Southwest.

Missouri, Oklahoma, Iowa, Indiana Nebraska, North Dakota, Colorado and New Mexico all reported record high hospitalizations this week. Nebraska’s largest hospitals started limiting elective surgeries and looked to bring in nurses from other states to cope with the surge. Hospital officials in Iowa and Missouri warned bed capacity could soon be overwhelmed.

The resurgence loomed over candidates and voters, fearful of both the virus itself and the economic toll of any new shutdowns to control its spread. The debate over how far to take economically costly measures has divided a country already sharply polarized over President Donald Trump’s turbulent four years in office.

The pandemic colored who voters chose at the ballot box and how they did it. While many Americans took advantage of expanded access to mail-in voting, lines were long in many polling places, with record turnout expected.

“It’s very serious that we have 400 people gathered in one space at the height of the pandemic here in Wisconsin. So, we’ve tried to take every measure to limit the movement throughout the room as possible,” said Claire Woodall-Vogg, the election commission director of the city of Milwaukee, where poll workers were spread out into 12 different pods to limit contact.

Iowa hospital officials warned their facilities and staff could be overwhelmed without serious efforts to curtail the virus spread. The state’s seven-day rolling average of positive cases reached 36.4% over the weekend, the third-highest in the nation behind South Dakota and Wyoming, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Hospitalizations reached a record 730 on Monday.


Suresh Gunasekaran, CEO of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said Iowa is entering its third peak, one that is higher than previous ones in May and July. He said his biggest concern is that this peak comes at the beginning of the cold weather season, when the flu and other respiratory conditions typically increase hospitalizations.

“The infection rate is definitely a leading indicator for hospitalizations, and the hospitalization rate is a leading indicator of mortality,” Gunasekaran said.

Health officials in Nebraska said hospitalizations have doubled in recent weeks, reaching a record 613 on Sunday.

“No doubt if this trend continues — not just at our hospitals — but every hospital in the state could be at capacity in a very short period of time,” Dr. Cary Ward, chief medical officer for CHI Health’s network of 14 hospitals across eastern Nebraska and western Iowa said during a video call with reporters.

In Missouri, leaders of several rural hospitals raised alarms about bed capacity during a conference call Monday with Republican Gov. Mike Parson, who drew renewed fire from his Democratic election challenger for his refusal

Read More
health

Americans head to polls amid harrowing surge in cases and hospitalizations

As Americans head to the voting booths Tuesday, the devastating Covid-19 pandemic looms: surging across the US yet again, setting grim records and forecast to take tens of thousands more lives across the country in the coming months.



a person wearing a blue hat: BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston's Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am - 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images
BOSTON, MA – OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston’s Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am – 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Experts have warned this bout with the virus will be the worst one yet — and alarming trends are already pointing in that direction. In just one month, the country’s 7-day case average nearly doubled. Last week, the US reported 99,321 new cases — the highest single day number of infections recorded for any country. And at least 31 states set daily infection records last month.

Hospitalizations are also surging, with the number of patients nationwide rising by more than 10,000 in just two weeks, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project. Hospitals in some parts of the country have hit their “breaking point.”

Hospital officials in El Paso, Texas, are now preparing to open the city’s civic center as an overflow medical facility and add a fourth mobile morgue.

And when hospitalizations climb, deaths are likely to follow, doctors have warned.

The virus’s spread has already changed the way Americans vote, as tens of millions of people have already voted by mail or prior to Election Day. People recovering from Covid-19 or quarantining from being exposed to the virus can still go vote, a spokesman for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

More than 231,500 people have died in the US and researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project a total of about 399,163 American lives lost by February 1.

The numbers will likely get worse before they get better and officials worry the upcoming holidays — and the gatherings that will come with them — will further fuel an already rampant spread into the winter months.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Public health measures touted by experts for months — including face masks, social distancing and regular hand washing — can help hold the virus down.

Health resources ‘stretched beyond belief’

At least 36 states are reporting more new cases than the previous week while only five

Read More
health

Kane, DuPage Coronavirus Hospitalizations Triple During October

WHEATON, IL — Coronavirus positivity rates and the number of new hospitalizations of people with symptoms of COVID-19 rose sharply across nearly every region of Illinois during the final week in October. All but one of the state’s 11 mitigation regions now have restrictions on indoor service at bars and restaurants and gatherings of more than 25 people.

In Region 8 — Kane and DuPage counties — indoor dining was halted last after the region’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate remained above 8 percent for three days. It has contined to rise since then.

For the week ending Tuesday, the percentage of specimens tested that came back positive for the virus rose by 0.4 percentage points to 9.8 percent in the two-county region — a new record since state public health officials began reporting the data in June. The next day, the seven-day rolling average jumped by another 0.4 points in a day to set a new record at 10.2 percent.

New hospitalizations in the west suburban region rose dramatically, according to the rounded seven-day rolling average of daily hospital admissions of patients with what state public health officials classify as “COVID-like illnesses,” or CLI.

The rate has double during the prior two weeks. As of Tuesday, an average of 36 people were newly hospitalized with symptoms of the virus every day, up from 23 a week earlier.

Meanwhile, the three-day rolling average of hospital bed availability declined. Surgical bed availability fell by 3 points to 22 percent, and beds in intensive care units fell by four points to 37 percent.

Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, said the state needs everyone to do their part to change the trend.

“We are on the precipice of the entire state entering into mitigation,” Ezike said Friday, announcing the new mitigation measures for Region 6 in East Central Illinois.

Restrictions were added to 10 of Illinois' 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions in October after coronavirus metrics triggered fail-safe measures established over the summer by state public health officials. (Illinois Department of Public Health)
Restrictions were added to 10 of Illinois’ 11 COVID-19 resurgence mitigation regions in October after coronavirus metrics triggered fail-safe measures established over the summer by state public health officials. (Illinois Department of Public Health)

RELATED: Illinois Restaurant Association To Vote On Indoor Dining Ban Suit

“These last few regions have seen rapid increases in test positivity, one right after another, because of increasing disease spread throughout our communities,” Ezike said. “We need all people to adhere to both the community mitigation measures and well as personal and family measures so we can swiftly turn our entire state around.”

As of Friday, there were 49 counties across the state, including several in the Chicago area, that are considered to be at the “orange” warning level, which means two or more countywide risk indicators suggest a heightened risk of the virus.

They include: Adams, Alexander, Bond, Boone, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, DeKalb, Douglas, DuPage, Effingham, Ford, Franklin, Greene, Grundy, Hamilton, Henderson, Jackson, Jo Daviess, Johnson, Kane, Kendall, Knox, Lee, Macon, Marion, McHenry, Mercer, Morgan, Ogle, Perry, Pike, Randolph, Rock Island, Saline, Sangamon, Shelby, Stephenson, Wabash, Warren,

Read More