hit

dentist

Former Salem dentist, community leader Selma Pierce hit, killed by car

Selma Pierce, a well-known community leader, retired dentist and former legislative candidate, was struck and killed by a car Tuesday evening, according to the Salem Police Department.

Pierce, 66, was the wife of Bud Pierce, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2016. Gov. Kate Brown defeated him. On Monday, KATU’s news partners reported that Bud Pierce would seek the governor’s  office in 2022.



a group of people posing for a photo


© Provided by KATU Portland


Selma Pierce was active in her community, well-known in political circles and ran for a seat in the state House this year as a Republican. She was unable to unseat incumbent Paul Evans, a Democrat, however.

In a statement released Tuesday night, House Republican Leader Christine Drazan of Canby said Republicans in the House were devastated.

“We are profoundly saddened by this sudden loss of our friend and community leader. Selma dedicated her life to serving people. She touched the lives of thousands through volunteer dental work to at-risk populations, service on local education foundations, and her and her husband Bud’s generous support of countless community organizations,” Drazan said. “The Pierces are a pillar of the Salem community and this loss will be felt deeply across our state. Our prayers are with Bud and the entire Pierce family this evening.”

In a tweet, Gov. Brown said she and her husband, Dan, extended their condolences to the Pierce family.

“They are in our thoughts during this difficult time,” she said.

Senate President Peter Courtney also expressed sorrow upon learning of Selma’s death.

“Selma was a dear person who always put others before herself. She cared deeply for those in need. Selma loved to smile and always searched for ways to make life better for others,” he said in a statement. “She was very devoted to her family. I can’t imagine Salem without her. My heart goes out to her husband Bud and her children, Kristina and Michael.”

Salem police said Selma was walking on Doaks Ferry Road NW near Hidden Valley Drive when a driver of a Chevrolet SUV struck her around 5 p.m.

Police said it appeared she was in the road when she was hit. She died at the scene.

The driver stopped and cooperated with investigators.

Selma was born in San Francisco to Lawrence and Priscilla Moon.

Her grandparents immigrated to America and her legislative campaign website detailed the racism her family experienced. Upon graduating from Harvard Business School, no one would hire her first-generation-Chinese-American father and he had to settle for a job in a family member’s market. The state of California eventually hired him as an auditor for state hospitals.

Selma attended the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and then earned a Doctor of Dental Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry.

She volunteered for many organizations, including Medical Teams International, Mission of Mercy, Salem Area Chamber of Commerce, OHSU Foundation Board of Trustees and many other organizations.

Selma was married to Bud,

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dentist

Well-known Salem dentist, community leader Selma Pierce hit, killed by car

Selma Pierce, a well-known community leader, retired dentist and former legislative candidate, was struck and killed by a car Tuesday evening, according to the Salem Police Department.

Pierce, 66, was the wife of Bud Pierce, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2016. Gov. Kate Brown defeated him. On Monday, KATU’s news partners reported that Bud Pierce would seek the governor’s  office in 2022.



a group of people posing for a photo


© Provided by KATU Portland


Selma Pierce was active in her community and ran for a seat in the state House this year as a Republican. She was unable to unseat incumbent Paul Evans, a Democrat, however.

In a statement released Tuesday night, House Republican Leader Christine Drazan of Canby said Republicans in the House were devastated.

“We are profoundly saddened by this sudden loss of our friend and community leader. Selma dedicated her life to serving people. She touched the lives of thousands through volunteer dental work to at-risk populations, service on local education foundations, and her and her husband Bud’s generous support of countless community organizations,” Drazan said. “The Pierces are a pillar of the Salem community and this loss will be felt deeply across our state. Our prayers are with Bud and the entire Pierce family this evening.”

In a tweet, Gov. Brown said she and her husband, Dan, extended their condolences to the Pierce family.

“They are in our thoughts during this difficult time,” she said.

Salem police said Selma was walking on Doaks Ferry Road NW near Hidden Valley Drive when a driver of a Chevrolet SUV struck her around 5 p.m.

Police said it appeared she was in the road when she was hit. She died at the scene.

The driver stopped and cooperated with investigators.

Selma was born in San Francisco to Lawrence and Priscilla Moon.

Her grandparents immigrated to America and her legislative campaign website detailed the racism her family experienced. Upon graduating from Harvard Business School, no one would hire her first-generation-Chinese-American father and he had to settle for a job in a family member’s market. The state of California eventually hired him as an auditor for state hospitals.

Selma attended the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and then earned a Doctor of Dental Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry.

She volunteered for many organizations, including Medical Teams International, Mission of Mercy, Salem Area Chamber of Commerce, OHSU Foundation Board of Trustees and many other organizations.

Selma was married to Bud, who is an oncologist, for over 35 years. They have two children, Kristina and Michael.

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dentist

Dentist who mowed down woman held for hit and run in Delhi

New Delhi, Dec 1 (IANS) A 42-year-old Delhi-based dentist has been arrested for a hit and run case in south Delhi in which a young woman was mowed down by the dentist’s speeding car in Lado Sarai, the police said on Tuesday.

According to the police, a PCR call regarding an accident at Lado Sarai red light was received at the Saket police station on November 17. A team of Delhi Police reached the spot and found that a woman was hit by a car and was injured. The woman was immediately shifted to AIIMS where she was declared brought dead. The car driver fled from the spot in the said car.

The police team collected footages of the CCTV cameras installed in and around the place of the accident. The footages were scanned thoroughly and the police team succeeded in gathering some information about the alleged car. The police got the details of the owner of the car and reached the address but the alleged driver was not found there.

“The team started gathering information about the whereabouts of the accused person. With consistent efforts, the location of the accused person was zeroed down in Kalkaji Extension. The team conducted a raid and arrested the accused who was identified as 42-year-old dentist Pankaj Sudhakar. He confessed to the crime and the offending car was seized,” said Atul Thakur, DCP, South Delhi.

–IANS

zaz/arm

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medicine

Remdesivir Medicine Market Will Hit Big Revenues In Future | Sanofi, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline – Press Release

Remdesivir Medicine Market Will Hit Big Revenues In Future | Sanofi, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline

Remdesivir Medicine Comprehensive Study by Application (Ebola Virus Disease, Marburg Virus Infection, Possible COVID-19 Treatment), Administration (Oral, Intravenous), End-users (Hospitals, Clinics, Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Others), Distribution Channel (Online Channel, Offline Channel) Players and Region – Global Market Outlook to 2025.

Global Remdesivir Medicine Market Comprehensive Study is an expert and top to bottom investigation on the momentum condition of the worldwide Global Remdesivir Medicine industry with an attention on the Global market. The report gives key insights available status of the Global Remdesivir Medicine producers and is an important wellspring of direction and course for organizations and people keen on the business. By and large, the report gives an inside and out understanding of 2020-2025 worldwide Remdesivir Medicine Market covering extremely significant parameters.

Key Players in This Report Include,
Gilead Sciences, Inc. (United States), Hainan Haiyao Co., Ltd. (China), Sanofi S.A. (France), GlaxoSmithKline plc (United Kingdom) and Cipla (India)

Free Sample Report + All Related Graphs & Charts @: https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/128698-global-remdesivir-medicine-market

Brief Summary of Global Remdesivir Medicine:
Remdesivir medicine is an anti-viral medication being studied as a possible post-infection treatment for COVID-19 illness. This medicine is a nucleotide analog, specifically an adenosine analog, which inserts into viral RNA chains causing their premature termination. It was developed by Gilead Sciences as a treatment for Ebola virus disease and Marburg virus infections. It is an investigational antiviral compound undergoing clinical trials in China, the United States and the United Kingdom as a potential treatment for COVID-19. It is not yet licensed or approved anywhere globally and has not been demonstrated to be safe or effective for any use.

Market Drivers

  • Increased Prevalence of COVID-19 Illness
  • Highly Effective Anti-viral Medicine

 

Market Trend

  • High Demand for Coronavirus Disease Treatment

 

Restraints

  • Lack of Clinical Evidence for COVID-19 Treatment

 

Opportunities

  • Increasing Number of Patients affecting COVID-19
  • Growth in the Healthcare Industry

 

Challenges

  • Stringent Government Rules and Regulations

This research report represents a 360-degree overview of the competitive landscape of the Global Remdesivir Medicine Market. Furthermore, it offers massive data relating to recent trends, technological, advancements, tools, and methodologies. The research report analyzes the Global Remdesivir Medicine Market in a detailed and concise manner for better insights into the businesses.

Regions Covered in the Global Remdesivir Medicine Market:

  • The Middle East and Africa (South Africa, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Israel, Egypt, etc.)
  • North America (United States, Mexico & Canada)
  • South America (Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, etc.)
  • Europe (Turkey, Spain, Turkey, Netherlands Denmark, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.)
  • Asia-Pacific (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and Australia).


Enquire for customization in Report @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/enquiry-before-buy/128698-global-remdesivir-medicine-market

The research study has taken the help of graphical presentation techniques such as infographics, charts, tables, and pictures. It provides guidelines for both established players and new entrants in the Global Remdesivir Medicine Market.

The detailed elaboration of the Global Remdesivir Medicine Market has been provided by applying industry analysis techniques such

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health

U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations hit three-month high over 50,000: Reuters tally

By Roshan Abraham and Kavya B

(Reuters) – The number of coronavirus patients in U.S. hospitals breached 50,000 on Tuesday, the highest level in nearly three months, as a surge in infections threatens to push the nation’s health care system to the edge of capacity.

Texas reported the highest number of currently hospitalized patients with 5,936, followed by Illinois with 3,594 and California with 3,270 patients, according to a Reuters tally. While California has three times as many people as Illinois, new cases have been the highest per capita in the Midwest.

Nationally, the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients rose over 64% since Oct. 1 to 50,176 on Tuesday, the highest since Aug. 7. The figure is still short of the record 58,370 hospitalizations set on July 22, according to a Reuters tally.

Hospitalizations are a key metric because, unlike case counts, they are not influenced by the number of tests performed. 

As millions of Americans voted in Tuesday’s presidential election, the number of cases in the country surpassed 9.4 million, rising by 1 million in just two weeks. 

On Friday, the United States set a world record by reporting over 100,000 new infections in a single day. 

Southern U.S. states, led by Texas, have the highest number of coronavirus hospitalizations with nearly 20,000 patients or 40% of the national total, followed by the Midwest, West and Northeast.

Hospitals in Wisconsin and Texas have been rushing to find more beds for coronavirus patients, as the state’s medical facilities struggle to keep pace with a surge in new infections. The Texas city of El Paso has converted a convention center into a field hospital to treat the overflow. 

Health experts believe the virus is surging because of private social gatherings, colder temperatures driving people inside, and Americans’ fatigue with COVID-19 restrictions that have now been in place for more than six months.

For every 10,000 people in the United States, over 278 coronavirus cases have been reported and about seven people have died, according to a Reuters analysis. In Europe there have been over 127 cases and nearly four deaths per 10,000 residents.

The White House coronavirus task force warned of a persistent and broad spread of COVID-19 in the western half of the United States and its members urged aggressive mitigation measures. 

(Reporting by Roshan Abraham and Kavya B in Bengaluru; Additional reporting by Shaina Ahluwalia; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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health

Hospitalizations in U.S. Hit Highest Level Since Mid-August

The number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 in the U.S. topped 48,000 on Monday, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project, continuing a monthslong increase and hitting the highest point since mid-August as people headed to the polls to vote in the presidential contest.

The rise comes as new confirmed infections are rising across the nation, and public-health officials and epidemiologists worry that the coming holiday season will accelerate the new surge in cases.

In Ohio, hospitalizations once again hit a new high, topping 1,800 for Monday, rising by more than 100 from the previous day, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project. Similar to the U.S. as a whole, the state has seen hospitalizations climb since early October.

Mike Abrams, chief executive and president of the Ohio Hospital Association, said he expected the state’s increase in hospitalizations to continue and is worried about the Thanksgiving holiday, when families will gather around tables across the nation.

“I do think that we aren’t finished setting records on hospitalizations or positives in Ohio,” Mr. Abrams said. He said Tuesday that 68% of the state’s hospital beds are full and 6.8% of those beds are occupied by Covid-19 patients. Of the state’s 4,580 intensive-care unit beds, 10.3% are being used by Covid-19 patients, Mr. Abrams said.

The Ohio Department of Health reported 4,229 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear cautioned that hospitalizations in the state are climbing more quickly.

“We are seeing in certain areas hospital systems becoming taxed,” the Democrat said Tuesday. “If we cannot control the increase, then it is a real possibility that we could face some real concerns with capacity.” Kentucky had 988 hospitalizations for Nov. 2, according to the Covid Tracking Project, the most the project had on record for the state.

For the U.S. overall, Monday’s hospitalization count is the highest since Aug. 11, according to Covid Tracking Project data. The U.S. hit a pandemic high of 59,940 hospitalizations on April 15, that data showed, when New York was bearing the brunt of a surge in coronavirus cases. After hitting a recent low of 28,608 hospitalizations Sept. 20, hospitalizations started to steadily increase around the beginning of October.

The latest increases are more widespread geographically and reaching more remote regions of the nation, which is expected to further strain resources needed for disaster response, said experts in health-care emergency planning. At least a dozen states, including Ohio, saw the numbers of Covid-19 patients in hospitals set a new high Monday, Covid Tracking Project data show.

Hospital stays from the virus have gotten shorter in the midst of advances in Covid-19 treatment, helping to ease the pressure on hospital capacity, but doctors and health-care disaster experts said those improvements aren’t enough to be able to combat the increase in hospitalizations.

Texas reported the most hospitalizations in the country Monday, with more than 5,000, followed by Illinois and California, which both had more than 3,000, and Florida, which had more than 2,000, according to

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medicine

How family medicine has changed on P.E.I. since COVID hit

You don’t have to spend much time at Dr. Kristy Newson’s office in Charlottetown to discover COVID-19 has changed the way she and her staff do their jobs. 

For one, the family doctor’s waiting room is completely empty, and the door locked. 

“We try not to fill up our waiting rooms just to avoid patients spreading infections,” said Newson, who also serves as president of the P.E.I. College of Family Physicians. 

“So we ask them to remain in their car until their appointment time. We then call down to them and they come right into the office. And between each patient, we have to disinfect and clean the rooms completely before the next patient can be seen.”

That means she’s not able to see as many patients at her office throughout the day — at least not without extending her hours.

Patients of some family physicians are now being instructed to wait in their vehicles for their appointment, as some waiting rooms like this one are off-limits. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

While Newson said some family physicians are doing just that, she and many others have turned to telephones and web cameras, as a way to squeeze in more patients. 

“Between each [in-person] patient I do some telemedicine appointments, just to give my staff the chance to clean the rooms,” said Newson.  

“We try to triage them over the phone, and if it’s a concern that could be addressed via telemedicine or virtual care, the patient would be offered that style of appointment. If they prefer to see us in person, or if we feel it’s something that needs a physical exam, then we would book them a regular routine visit in our office.”

Doctors seeing just as many patients

According to Health PEI, about 30 per cent of care provided by Island family physicians is now virtual or over the phone. 

Newson maintains with the move to more virtual appointments, there’s been minimal impact on the quality and speed of care family physicians can provide. 

“The perception may be that physicians aren’t seeing as many patients. But truly, it’s more a change in the type of appointments we’re able to offer,” said Newson.

“I wouldn’t say the wait times for urgent or semi-urgent appointments are any longer at this stage. Possibly for non-urgent, annual checkups, those sorts of things, those things have probably been pushed several months down the road.”

Rooms have to be cleaned between appointments, which lowers the number of patients family physicians are able to see in person each day, unless they extend their hours. (Steve Bruce/CBC)

Another change for family physicians since the start of the pandemic — they’ve stopped seeing patients with coughs, fevers and sore throats. 

They’re now directed to the cough and fever clinics in Charlottetown and Summerside. 

“That’s just to prevent the spread of infectious disease at family medicine offices,” said Newson.

“At the cough and fever clinics, they’re able to provide separate exits and entrances for the patients, patients are able to

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health

With coronavirus exploding in Europe, hospitals calculate how long until they hit capacity

For Germany, the breaking point could come in December. France and Switzerland might crack by mid-November. Belgium could hit its limit by the end of the week.



a person sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Medical staff conduct a CT scan on a covid-19 patient in the intensive care unit at Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin.


© Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters
Medical staff conduct a CT scan on a covid-19 patient in the intensive care unit at Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin.

Europe, in the throes of a savage second wave of the pandemic, is on the verge of a medical crisis, with intensive care units quickly filling to the breaking point. Governments are finding that when confronted by the unforgiving reality of an exponentially spreading virus, even vast investments to expand hospital capacity can be washed away in days.

Germany, Europe’s best-resourced nation, risks being swamped even after increasing its intensive care beds by a quarter over the summer. Belgium, which had doubled its intensive care capacity, is now preparing for decisions about which needy patient should get a bed.

“This huge capacity we’ve built gave a false impression of security. It gave a higher buffer, but ultimately it only represents a week when you’re in an exponential phase,” said Emmanuel André, a leading Belgian virologist who has advised the government on the pandemic — and has bitterly criticized leaders for acting too slowly this fall.



Medical personnel work at the MontLégia hospital in Liège, Belgium.


© Valentin Bianchi/AP
Medical personnel work at the MontLégia hospital in Liège, Belgium.

In retrospect, the warning signs could be seen as early as July, when cases in Europe started ticking up again after the relaxation of spring lockdowns. In absolute terms, the numbers were still tiny. Spanish emergency room doctors enjoyed a respite, after being hammered in March and April. Italian nurses headed to the beach. Central European leaders — among the worst hit now, but back then largely untouched — gathered at the end of August for a triumphant conference to discuss the post-pandemic era.

But the math for exponential growth is as simple as it is scary. When two coronavirus cases double to four, and four cases double to eight, it doesn’t take long for the numbers to reach the tens of thousands — and beyond.

[Gloom settles over Europe as days darken and coronavirus surges]

“An exponential phenomenon starts with very small numbers, and it is not tangible for weeks and weeks and weeks for people out there,” André said. “If you look at the numbers, you have very strong indicators early on that things are going wrong, but it is only at the very end that things explode.”

Europe is now feeling the explosion.

The continent reported 1.5 million cases over the past week, the highest yet during the pandemic, the World Health Organization’s Europe director, Hans Kluge, told an emergency meeting of health ministers on Thursday. Deaths rose by a third in seven days. Occupancy of intensive care units doubled in 17 days leading up to Oct. 25 in countries tracked by the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.

“Europe is at the epicenter of this pandemic once again,” Kluge said.

A week ago, French intensive

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health

Coronavirus Live Updates: New U.S. Cases Hit Fresh Record

Nearly 46 million people have now been infected with the coronavirus world-wide, and nearly 1.19 million have died.

U.K.: Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s cabinet was due to meet Saturday to discuss plans for a new nationwide lockdown in England to curb the virus’s spread, according to a government official, who stressed a final decision hasn’t been made. Scientists at Imperial College London estimate infections are running at almost 100,000 a day in England, and hospitalizations and deaths are creeping up. The seven-day average for deaths hit 213 on Tuesday, its highest tally since May.

The government has been experimenting with localized restrictions in England but cases have continued rising. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland set their own public-health policies and have already closed some businesses and imposed curbs on household mixing. Mr. Johnson is due to hold a televised press conference at 4:00 p.m. London time on Saturday.

Greece: New restrictions, including mandatory mask wearing indoors and outdoors, will be take effect in Greece starting Tuesday. Other measures include a midnight to 5 a.m. curfew, and university courses will revert to online learning. In the Athens region and northern Greece, where the virus is circulating at higher levels, the government has also ordered the closure of bars, restaurants, theaters, museums and gyms.

While Greece has among the lowest infection rates in Europe, new cases are rising rapidly. Announcing the new measures, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said the goal was to prevent the virus from spreading out of control.

“We must act now, before the intensive-care units are overwhelmed by people fighting for their life. Now, while we still have the ability to detect and track cases,” he said in a televised address.

India: The new-case count was below 50,000 for the sixth day in a row, with the country reporting 48,268 cases over the preceding 24 hours, and 551 deaths. Confirmed cases now exceed 8.1 million, with a death toll of 121,641.

Japan: The 778 new cases reported Saturday pushed the total past 100,000, and the 11 deaths brought the toll to 1,755. Starting Sunday, the government will allow business travelers returning from trips of seven days or less to any country to skip the two-week quarantine, provided they meet conditions including a negative test result.

The government has also lowered travel alerts on nine countries including China, South Korea and Australia. From Sunday onward, travelers from those countries won’t be required to take a coronavirus test upon arrival.

South Korea: With 127 new Covid-19 cases reported, it was the fourth consecutive day above 100. Locally transmitted infections have been rising this week, with new clusters around workplaces and social gatherings. Local authorities are on high alert this weekend, concerned that Halloween festivities could prompt a fresh wave.

China: Mainland Chinese authorities reported six new locally transmitted symptomatic cases, all in and around the city of Kashgar in the far western Xinjiang region and previously classified as asymptomatic. Chinese health authorities typically highlight and focus on positive cases showing

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health

More hospitals hit by ransomware as feds warn about cyberattacks

A recent wave of ransomware attacks has infected more hospitals than previously known, including a University of Vermont network with locations in New York and Vermont.

The University of Vermont Health Network is analyzing what appears to be a ransomware attack from the same cybercrime gang that has infected at least three other hospitals in recent weeks, according to two sources familiar with the investigation who weren’t authorized to comment about it before it is complete.

Several federal agencies warned Wednesday of “an increased and imminent cybercrime threat” to the country’s health care providers, particularly from a gang that uses a strand of ransomware called Ryuk. The U.S. has repeatedly hit record highs for daily confirmed coronavirus infections.

The FBI and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, part of the Department of Homeland Security, sent an updated alert Thursday night with new technical information, adding that they have “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.”

As many as 20 medical facilities have been hit by the recent wave of ransomware, said a person with knowledge of the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to speak publicly. The figure includes multiple facilities within the same hospital chain.

Three other hospital chains have recently confirmed cyberattacks, believed to be ransomware, by the same gang: the Sky Lakes Medical Center, with 21 locations in Oregon; Dickinson County Healthcare System in Michigan and Wisconsin; and the St. Lawrence Health System in northern New York. It was not clear how much of their systems or how many locations had been hit by the ransomware.

Tom Hottman, a spokesperson for Sky Lakes Medical Center, confirmed that the company had been infected with Ryuk and said its computers were inaccessible, halting radiation treatments for cancer patients.

“We’re still able to meet the care needs for most patients using work-around procedures, i.e. paper rather than computerized records. It’s slower but seems to work,” he said in an email.

Joe Rizzo, a spokesperson for Dickinson, said in an email that their hospitals and clinics are using paper copies for some services because computer systems are down.

Rich Azzopardi, senior adviser to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, said the state’s Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services and other groups had been in communication about the St. Lawrence attack.

Details about a major wave of ransomware attacks on U.S. hospitals began to emerge at the end of September when computer systems for Universal Health Services, one of the biggest hospital chains in the country, were hit, forcing some doctors and nurses to use pen and paper to file patient information. Jane Crawford, the chain’s director of public relations, said in an email at the beginning of October that no one had died because of the attack.

Ransomware attacks often gain access to secure systems and then encrypt files. The people behind the attacks then demand money to decrypt the files.

Ryuk is transmitted through

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