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Precision Medicine Market Sets 2025 Economic Growth Target with Higher Percent, a Post-COVID 19 Plan

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

According to the 2020 Market Research Future Survey, the analysts saw 12.48% of business growth in the Global Precision Medicine Market 2020 is expected to register. Five months later, in May 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread worldwide, there was less possibility that business was having a favorable impact on a broader note. The analysts further studied that the market can reach a valuation of USD 126.14 Billion by 2025. The entire growth scenario is predicted to take place during the years 2014-2022.

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Precision Medicine–Boomers & Decliners

The field of precision medicine has made extensive progress with prime discoveries such as microarray/ biochips and single nucleotide polymorphism. These advancements in healthcare have been beneficial for patients to the core of the pharmaceutical industry as well as society. The advent of precision medicine has made researchers understand the method of patients clinical profiles. Human genome research is the future of precision medicine as it owes maximum potential to modify medical treatments for individual patients through the understanding of molecular profiles, genetics, and clinical characteristics in determining the treatment. These factors have made the precision medicine market more robust and stable during the COVID 19 pandemic period.

MRFR’s report presents the factor rising prevalence of cancer to be projected as a booster for personalized cancer diagnostics and therapeutics demands that will leave a positive impact on theprecision medicine market growth. As per a recently published article, in 2018, in the U.S., roughly 1.7 million cases were diagnosed with cancer alone. Apart from this, more factors propelling the growth of this market are escalating online collaborative forums, rising efforts to characterize genes and advancements in cancer biology.

Furthermore, precision medicine applications are chiefly directed toward better treatment against oncological diseases, with an estimated 30% and above market leadership over other segments. According to the data reported in clinicaltrials.gov, the United States and a few European countries are the foremost hubs for conducting and recruiting patient pool for precision medicine applications in oncology globally. The elevated support from the government through funding and rapid growth of genomic analysis might boost the development of the precision medicine market at a fast velocity in the forecast period.

Precision Medicine Market Segment Review

The global precision medicine market has been studied under ecosystem players, sub-markets, and therapeutics.

By the segment of ecosystem players, the global precision medicine market has included diagnostic companies, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology companies, clinical laboratories, and healthcare IT specialists/big data companies. The diagnostic tool companies segment grabbed a market value of USD 16.27 million back in 2017.

By the segment of sub-markets, the market has included molecular diagnostics, companion diagnostics, biomarker-based tests, targeted therapeutics, pharmacogenomics (PGX), and others.

By the segment of therapeutics, the market has included cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer/oncology, infectious diseases, central nervous system, and others.

Precision Medicine Market Regional Aspect

North America presently

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fitness

Low fitness linked to higher depression and anxiety risk

People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60% greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the findings published in BMC Medicine.

Lead author, PhD student Aaron Kandola (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise aimed at improving different types of fitness is not only good for your physical health, but may also have mental health benefits.”

The study involved 152,978 participants aged 40 to 69 of the UK Biobank study. Their baseline aerobic fitness at the start of the study period was tested by using a stationary bike with increasing resistance, while their muscular fitness was measured with a grip strength test. They also completed a questionnaire gauging depression and anxiety symptoms.

Seven years later they were tested again for depression and anxiety symptoms, and the researchers found that high aerobic and muscular fitness at the start of the study was associated with better mental health seven years later.

People with the lowest combined aerobic and muscular fitness had 98% higher odds of depression, 60% higher odds of anxiety, and 81% higher odds of having either one of the common mental health disorders, compared to those with high levels of overall fitness.

The researchers accounted for potentially confounding factors at baseline such as diet, socioeconomic status, chronic illness, and mental illness symptoms.

Previous studies have found that people who exercise more are less likely to experience mental illnesses, but most studies rely on people self-reporting their activity levels, which can be less reliable than the objective physical fitness measures used here.

Senior author Dr Joseph Hayes (UCL Psychiatry and Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust) said: “Our findings suggest that encouraging people to exercise more could have extensive public health benefits, improving not only our physical health but our mental health too. Improving fitness through a combination of cardio exercise and strength and resistance training appears to be more beneficial than just focusing on aerobic or muscular fitness.”

Aaron Kandola added: “Reports that people are not as active as they used to be are worrying, and even more so now that global lockdowns have closed gyms and limited how much time people are spending out of the house. Physical activity is an important part of our lives and can play a key role in preventing mental health disorders.

“Other studies have found that just a few weeks of regular intensive exercise can make substantial improvements to aerobic and muscular fitness, so we are hopeful that it may not take much time to make a big difference to your risk of mental illness.”

###

The research involved academics at UCL, King’s College London and Harvard University, and was supported by Wellcome, the Medical Research Council, the UK Department of Health, the Scottish government, Northwest Regional Development Agency, Welsh Assembly government, the

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fitness

Higher fitness levels linked to lower AFib risk in male, African American veterans

heart
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

Higher fitness levels reduced the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm, known as atrial fibrillation, by 30% to 50% in a study of male, African American veterans, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2020.

Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. According to the American Heart Association, at least 2.7 million Americans are living with AFib.

“Engaging in physical activity to increase fitness is an inexpensive and practical intervention that health care professionals can prescribe to patients to prevent and manage cardiovascular disease,” said lead researcher Apostolos Tsimploulis, M.D., a cardiology fellow at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. “All of our evidence suggests the health benefits associated with increased cardiorespiratory fitness and reduced risk of atrial fibrillation are the same for all adults regardless of race.”

To study the effects of exercise on the development of atrial fibrillation, researchers examined the medical records of more than 11,000 middle-aged, male African American veterans (average age 58) from 1985 to 2013. None exhibited evidence of heart disease during or prior to completing a symptom-limited treadmill stress test at two VA Medical Centers—in Washington, D.C., and Palo Alto, California.

Participants were categorized into four fitness groups based on their age-specific cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). CRF was measured in metabolic equivalents, or METs, resting metabolic rate (1 MET=3.5 ml of O2/kg of body weight per minute). The groups were categorized as: least fit, moderately fit, fit and highly fit.

A search of medical records was conducted by two independent investigators to directly assess the association between CRF and atrial fibrillation. Models were adjusted for risk factors, including heart or blood pressure medications, age and body mass index.

During an average follow-up of 10.7 years, 1,423 veterans developed atrial fibrillation:

  • 421 (16.6%) in the least fit group;
  • 366(10.9%) in the moderately fit group;
  • 323 (11.9%) in the fit group; and
  • 313 (12%) in the high-fit group.

When compared to the least-fit group, the atrial fibrillation risk was:

  • 29% lower in the moderately fit group;
  • 37% lower in the fit group; and
  • 51% lower in the high fit group.

Researchers noted the study results are strong based on the number of participants, and atrial fibrillation incidence was established during a follow-up period spanning roughly 17 years (median 10.7 years). Access to adjusted, longitudinal data, including medications and heart risk factors, along with equal access to care (care from the VA regardless of a patient’s ability to pay) are significant factors. This permitted continuous follow-up and minimized the potential for disparities in medical care.

Tsimploulis noted the precise cause of atrial fibrillation was not determined. In addition, CRF was measured only once; the level or frequency of physical activity was not assessed; and follow-up data on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness or physical activity of the participants over time were not available.

“We cannot

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health

Proinflammatory Dietary Pattern Linked to Higher CV Risk

Dietary patterns with higher inflammatory potential were significantly associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke in a new pooled analysis of three prospective cohort studies.

The analysis included 210,145 US women and men followed for up to 32 years in the Nurses’ Health Studies I and II and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

After adjustment for use of anti-inflammatory medications and CVD risk factors, those whose dietary pattern ranked in the highest quintile of inflammatory potential had a 38% higher risk of CVD (hazard ratio comparing highest to lowest quintiles, 1.38), a 46% higher risk of coronary heart disease (HR, 1.46), and a 28% higher risk of stroke (HR, 1.28), all P for trend < .001.

Jun Li, MD, PhD, and colleagues at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts, published the findings of their study in the November 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The inflammatory potential of a diet was assessed using a food-based, dietary index called the “empirical dietary inflammatory pattern” or EDIP.

In an interview, Li explained that the EDIP was developed 4 years ago by many of the same authors involved with this study, including nutrition heavyweights Walter C. Willett, MD, DrPH, and Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD, both from Harvard.

“We summarized all the foods people eat into 39 defined food groups and did a reduced-rank regression analysis that looked at these 39 food groups and three inflammatory markers — interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor 2. We found 18 food groups that are most predictive of these biomarkers, and the EDIP was calculated as the weighted sum of these 18 food groups.”

Individuals who had higher intakes of green leafy vegetables (kale, spinach, arugula), dark yellow vegetables (pumpkin, yellow peppers, carrots), whole grains, fruits, tea, coffee and wine had lower long-term CVD risk than those with higher intakes of red meat, processed meat, organ meat, refined carbohydrates, and sweetened beverages. 

The associations were consistent across cohorts and between sexes and remained significant in multiple sensitivity analysis that adjusted for alcohol consumption, smoking pack-years, use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications, sodium intake, and blood pressure.

In a secondary analysis, diets with higher inflammatory potential were also associated with significantly higher biomarker levels indicative of more systemic, vascular, and metabolic inflammation, as well as less favorable lipid profiles.

“We wanted to be able to provide guidance on dietary patterns and food combinations,” said Li. “If you tell people to eat more polyunsaturated fats instead of saturated fat or trans fat, most people don’t know what foods are higher and lower in those nutrients. Also, many foods have different nutrients — some of which are good and some of which are bad — so we wanted to help people find the foods with the higher proportion of healthy nutrients rather than point out specific nutrients to avoid.”

Researchers used prospectively gathered data from the Nurses’

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health

Pregnant women with coronavirus at higher risk of severe illness, death, CDC finds

Pregnant women who contract the coronavirus are more at risk for severe illness and death than non-pregnant women, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analysis found. The agency has previously warned that pregnant people might be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, but research is ongoing.

The new report, issued Monday, analyzed data collected from over 400,000 women ages 15-44 with symptomatic COVID-19.

Of the 409,462 women with symptomatic coronavirus, 23,434 were pregnant.

CORONAVIRUS FACE MASKS AT POLLS ENCOURAGED, BUT NOT REQUIRED IN SOME STATES

“After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and underlying medical conditions, pregnant women were significantly more likely than were non-pregnant women to be admitted to an intensive care unit, receive ventilation, receive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and die,” the report said.

The CDC said the findings may be due to the physiologic changes associated with pregnancy.

The CDC said the findings may be due to the physiologic changes associated with pregnancy.
(iStock)

The CDC said the findings may be due to the physiologic changes associated with pregnancy, including increased heart rate and oxygen consumption, decreased lung capacity, immunity changes and increased risk for thromboembolic disease.

POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION MAY LAST 3 YEARS AFTER CHILDBIRTH, STUDY FINDS

Separately, the analysis also found racial and ethnic disparities in both risks for infection and disease severity among pregnant women, “indicating a need to address potential drivers of risk in these populations,” the report said.

The health agency said pregnant women should be counseled about the importance of seeking prompt medical care if they develop symptoms of coronavirus, and that there should be a strong emphasis on coronavirus prevention for pregnant women at each medical appointment.

OVER HALF OF CORONAVIRUS-INFECTED PREGNANT WOMEN SHOWED NO SYMPTOMS, CDC FINDS

“To minimize the risk for acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection, pregnant women should limit unnecessary interactions with persons who might have been exposed to or are infected with SARS-CoV-2, including those within their household, as much as possible,” the CDC said. “When going out or interacting with others, pregnant women should wear a mask, social distance, avoid persons who are not wearing a mask, and frequently wash their hands.”

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE 

The CDC also advised pregnant women stay up to date with flu shots and prenatal care.

Source Article

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health

Pregnant women with Covid-19 face higher risk of severe illness and death, study says

Pregnant women infected with the coronavirus are more likely to become severely ill and die from Covid-19, and they’re at increased risk for premature delivery, according to a pair of reports released Monday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.





© Shutterstock


Although the overall risk of severe illness or death remains low, CDC researchers found that pregnant women with coronavirus are more likely to need intensive care, ventilation and heart and lung support than non-pregnant women with the virus.

A separate report found that the rate of preterm birth, when a baby is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy, is 12.9% among women with coronavirus, compared to 10.2% among the general population.

The new research adds to a growing body of evidence that pregnant women are at increased risk when it comes to coronavirus, said Dr. Denise Jamieson, chair of the gynecology and obstetrics department at Emory University School of Medicine.

“It also demonstrates that their infants are at risk, even if their infants are not infected, they may be affected,” Jamieson noted on a call with reporters Monday.

Increased risk for severe illness and death

For one of the reports, researchers reviewed data on 461,825 women between the ages of 15 and 44 who tested positive for Covid-19 between January 22 and October 3. They focused only on those who experienced coronavirus symptoms.

The team adjusted for outside factors and found that pregnant women were more likely to need intensive care, with 10.5 per 1,000 pregnant women admitted to the ICU, compared to 3.9 per 1,000 women who aren’t pregnant.

Pregnant women were 3 times more likely to need help breathing with invasive ventilation than women who aren’t pregnant. Similarly, they were at greater risk of requiring lung and heart support with oxygenation.

They were also more likely to die, with 1.5 deaths per 1,000 pregnant women, compared to 1.2 per 1,000 women who aren’t pregnant.

In keeping with trends seen across the general population, researchers found some racial and ethnic minorities had an even greater potential for infection or severe disease. Among pregnant women, Hispanic women were 2.4 times more likely to die and Asian and Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander women had a more pronounced risk for ICU admission, they found.

The team noted that regardless of whether they were pregnant, women over 35 were more likely to experience severe illness.

The researchers said that the greater probability for severe illness among pregnant women might be due to physiological changes in pregnancy, including increased heart rate and decreased lung capacity.

“To reduce the risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19, pregnant women should be counseled about the importance of seeking prompt medical care if they have symptoms and measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection should be strongly emphasized for pregnant women and their families during all medical encounters, including prenatal care visits,” the team wrote.

Risk of preterm delivery and infant infection

Pregnant women with coronavirus infection were also more likely to deliver babies

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health

CDC: Pregnant women with COVID-19 have higher risk for preterm birth

Nov. 2 (UPI) — Pregnant women infected with COVID-19 are about 25% more likely to deliver their babies preterm, according to data released Monday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About 13% of babies born to mothers with the disease were delivered preterm, or at less than 37 weeks, the data showed.

Just over 10% of babies in the United States are born preterm, according to the CDC.

“The proportion of preterm live births among women with [COVID-19] infection during pregnancy was higher than that in the general population in 2019, suggesting that pregnant women with [the disease] infection might be at risk for preterm delivery,” agency researchers wrote.

Still, the findings are “preliminary and describe primarily women with second and third trimester infection, and … subject to change pending completion of pregnancy for all women in the cohort,” they said.

For the analysis, the CDC researchers reviewed data on pregnancy and infant outcomes among 5,252 women with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 15 states and Puerto Rico reported between March 29 and Oct. 14.

Among 3,912 live births with known gestational age, 12.9% were preterm, the agency said.

However, fewer than 3% of infants for whom test results were available had evidence of the virus, and most of them were born to mothers who had been infected within one week of delivery, the agency said.

Among 610 infants with reported test results, 2.6% tested positive for COVID-19, the data showed.

Previous studies have shown that pregnant women are unlikely to pass the disease on to their children.

However, data released by the CDC in June indicated that expecting mothers may be at increased risk for severe illness from the virus.

These concerns appear to have been confirmed in a separate analysis the agency released Monday, which found that pregnant women infected with COVID-19 were more than twice as likely to require treatment in a hospital intensive care unit and nearly three times as likely to need mechanical ventilation than “non-pregnant” women.

However, “the absolute risks for severe outcomes for women were low,” according to the CDC.

“Pregnant women were at increased risk for severe COVID-19-associated illness,” the CDC researchers said.

“To reduce the risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19, pregnant women should be counseled about the importance of seeking prompt medical care if they have symptom sand measures to prevent [coronavirus] infection should be strongly emphasized for pregnant women and their families,” they said.

Source Article

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health

Fading Sense of Smell Could Signal Higher Death Risk in Older Adults | Health News

By Cara Roberts Murez
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) — If you’re a senior who can’t smell onions, smoke, chocolate or natural gas, it’s time to see your doctor.

Seniors who lose their sense of smell — which doctors call olfactory dysfunction — have higher odds of dying from all causes within five years, new research shows. Scientists had previously found a link between olfactory dysfunction and impaired thinking and memory.

“We suspected there would be an association with olfactory dysfunction and mortality as well, considering that this is an early marker for a lot of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s and dementia,” said study author Dr. Janet Choi, a resident in otolaryngology at the University of Southern California.

Her team reviewed nationwide survey and death data from about 3,500 people age 40 and over. The surveys included self-reported loss of smell as well an objective smell test.

Over the five-year study, researchers found no increased risk of death based on self-reported loss of smell.

But the risk of death rose 18% for every 1-point decrease in scores on a “pocket smell test.” On the test, participants were asked to identify eight scents: onion, soap, leather, smoke, grape, strawberry, chocolate and natural gas. They needed to identify at least six to be considered having a normal sense of smell.

The mortality link was significant for adults 65 and older, but not among those between 40 and 64, researchers reported.

Sense of smell is mostly controlled by a nerve from the brain called the olfactory nerve. Olfactory dysfunction leads to more than 200,000 doctor visits a year, according to the study.

A diminished or lost sense of smell can lead to malnutrition, because people may lose their appetite or enjoyment of food, according to the researchers. It’s also linked to depression and a poorer quality of life.

The findings were published Oct. 22 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

“We do know that, speaking to patients, they do lose their ability to enjoy life’s simple pleasures, like smelling flowers or enjoying a nice meal out with family or friends,” said Dr. Aria Jafari, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington in Seattle.

“Those things can severely impact their quality of life and that can result in depression and associated conditions that could result in a medical condition or death,” said Jafari, who wasn’t part of the study.

Loss of smell may also prevent someone from noticing the smell from a gas leak or a fire, which can be life-threatening. It can also be an early sign of Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s. New loss of smell and taste can be a symptom of COVID-19.

Jafari said he screens patients for loss of smell and advises patients with olfactory dysfunction that they could be at a higher risk of injury.

Treatment varies depending on the reasons for the loss of smell, Jafari said. In some cases, treating chronic sinus issues could fix the

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health

Coronavirus deaths 5 times higher than flu in hospitalized patients, CDC says

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Study authors analyzed health records for nearly 4,000 COVID-19 patients and over 5,400 flu patients from the Veterans Health Administration and compared the complications for each. 

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

FLU VACCINE IN KIDS REDUCES RISK OF RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS, STUDY FINDS

“The percentage of COVID-19 patients who died while hospitalized (21.0%) was more than five times that of influenza [flu] patients (3.8%), and the duration of hospitalization was almost three times longer for COVID-19 patients,” the authors wrote. Also, the percentage of coronavirus patients who were sent to the intensive care unit more than doubled flu patients.

Further, they found that coronavirus patients were at a higher risk for 17 other complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES UPDATED CPR GUIDELINES THAT EMPHASIZE RECOVERY

After adjusting for variables like age and comorbidities among coronavirus patients, those from minority groups had a higher risk of nine complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

“The higher risk for certain complications among racial and ethnic minority patients provides further evidence that certain racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionally affected by COVID-19 and that this disparity is not solely accounted for by age and underlying medical conditions,” authors wrote.

The coronavirus patients in the study were on average “slightly older” than the flu patients (70 vs. 69 years old, respectively), the study noted, but the flu patients had more underlying health issues.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The CDC said health care providers need to be diligent about looking for symptoms to improve patient mortality and lower long-term disability.

Source Article

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health

Higher Donor BMI Tied to Improved Lung Transplant Survival

Lung transplant patients who received a lung from obese donors had a 15-20% reduction in mortality at 1 year in one of the first studies to examine the impact of donor body mass index (BMI) and post-transplant survival.

Findings from the retrospective trial, which included data on patients and donors registered with the United Network for Organ Sharing Standard Transplant and Analysis database, suggest that donor obesity may confer a protective benefit for transplanted lungs.

The findings were presented this week in a poster session at the virtual CHEST conference, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians.

The BMI of lung transplant recipients has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality, with studies showing an increased risk of death following transplant in patients who are either underweight or overweight, said Sung Choi, MD, of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, who presented the findings.

For example, in a 2017 study involving over 17,000 lung transplants performed in the U.S. from 2005 to 2016, underweight and overweight lung recipients (i.e., BMI ≤20 and ≥28 at the time of listing) were found to be at increased risk for both short- and long-term mortality.

Recipient weight-loss prior to lung transplantation was also associated with a reduction in mortality and days on mechanical ventilation in a 2015 study, with greater reductions in BMI associated with greater survival benefit.

And, in a 2014 consensus statement, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation recommended that a BMI of 30 or greater be considered a relative contraindication to lung transplantation.

Regarding donor BMI, however, Choi told MedPage Today that there hasn’t been prior research examining the impact on lung recipient outcomes and that the findings from his team’s study were a surprise: “We really weren’t expecting this result,” he said.

“We thought greater donor BMI might be associated with an increase in recipient mortality or maybe a null finding. What we found was striking to us. There appeared to be a dose-dependent relationship, with higher donor BMI associated with lower recipient mortality at 90 days and 1 year after the transplant,” Choi said.

Close to 16,000 adult patients who received single- or double-lung transplants from 2005 to 2018 were included in the analysis. Median age of the lung recipients was 59, and roughly 60% were male. Donors were categorized as underweight (BMI <18.5), normal weight (18.5 to <25), overweight (25 to <30), class I obesity (30 to <35), class II obesity (35 to <40), and class III obesity (≥40.0).

Average donor BMI was 25.9, and 45% were classified as normal weight.

A survival benefit at 1 year was observed among patients who received a lung transplant from donors in obesity class 1 (HR 0.867, 95% CI 0.772-0.975, P<0.01) and obesity classes II/III (HR 0.804, 95% CI 0.688-0.941, P<0.01) compared with lungs from normal-weight donors, the researchers reported.

In adjusted analyses, the team reported lower odds of survival with increased donor age, male sex, and presence of diabetes.

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