hard

fitness

As 75 Hard fitness program trends on TikTok, experts raise red flags

As the coronavirus pandemic rages on and quarantine orders are being extended, people have turned to new places to get workout inspiration at home.

Fitness videos on TikTok have grown exponentially since the pandemic began, as many looked for new ways to stay in shape. Fitness challenges like #DragonFlag, #OneMinuteFitness and #PlankChallenge have gone viral in recent months, and celebrities like Carrie Underwood have even joined in.

Experts urge those just starting out to take it slow before jumping into some of the advanced moves seen in popular TikTok videos, and the intense program called 75 Hard that’s trending on the platform is no exception.

The 75 Hard program, created by entrepreneur and podcaster Andy Frisella and described as a “mental toughness” program, outlines rules users must follow for 75 days. They are:

  • Do two 45-minute workouts a day, one of which must be outside
  • Follow a healthy diet with zero alcohol or cheat days
  • Take a progress picture every day
  • Drink one gallon of water daily
  • Read 10 pages a day of a nonfiction book
  • If you fail, you must start over again at Day One
  • 75 Hard found life on TikTok during the pandemic after 22-year-old Rylee Ollearis documented her journey doing the program from May to July. Her first video about it has racked up more than 4 million views.

    “I decided to post on TikTok for my five followers at the time… ‘Hey guys, I’m doing this crazy challenge, this crazy program,’ and the video started to blow up,” Ollearis told “GMA.”

    “I’ve almost given up myself a few too many times in the past,” she explained about what drew her to the intense program. “I wanted to prove to myself for this time that I could be tough enough to complete something that I set my mind to.”

    Ollearis’ audio from her Day One video is now used in more than 500 TikTok videos of other users trying out the program for themselves. The hashtag #75Hard itself has over 126 million views on the platform.

    The recent college graduate is now a wellness coach and said many people have reached out to her about the program since finding her videos. While she recognized that the program is a major commitment, she said she chose to do it the middle of quarantine because she could put the majority of her daily focus on making sure she was being mindful with her workouts and recovery.

    “Understanding that two 45-minute workouts every single day is a lot. You’re pushing your body, but you also have to ensure that you’re getting the right recovery, that you’re including active rest into those days to make sure that you’re not hurting yourself in any way,” she said.

    Experts raise ‘red flags’ about 75 Hard

    One of the concerns about 75 Hard, according to many experts, is many may opt to ignore the 75 Hard recommendations and begin the workout plan without seeking advice from a physician first, and this can be

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    dentist

    Brushing your teeth too hard will do more damage than good, says aesthetic dentist Angel Mansoor

    angel1

    General and aesthetic dentist Angel Mansoor.

    Niloufar Saleem, Staff Reporter

     

    Too much harshness while brushing teeth does more damage than good, says Dr. Angel Mansoor, a general and aesthetic dentist, in an exclusive Facebook Live interview with Gulf Today in Dubai on Sunday.

     

    Dr. Angel Mansoor, a consultant at the 7 Dimensions Medical Centre in Dubai, is a dentist who strives to provide her patients with quality dental treatment pertaining to both naturally aesthetic and biologically functional needs.

     

    As a certified invasalign provider, Dr. Mansoor highly recommends choosing invasalign in comparison to the traditional method as it is easier, hassle free and looks almost invisible, which ends up giving the patient more confidence on how they look, overall.

     

    She speaks about how other than working faster, invasalign is also a method that is suitable for everyone.

     

    Dr. Mansoor also goes on to dispels some myths that people have regarding general dental care.

     

    She insists on brushing twice a day and not ignoring the use of a dental floss.

     

    The only thing that can be consumed after the night brushing is water, she says.

     

    She also speaks on how not flossing regularly can damage almost 36 per cent of the teeth.

     

    Dr. Mansoor sheds some light on how overlooking regular stains on the teeth can end up in a painful case of plaque or cavity.

     


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    Ajman Police launch health initiative

     


    She also insists on getting a panaromic X-ray in every first visit to the dentist as it helps examine the teeth, gums and some hidden issues, which can end up causing damage in the future.

     

    As a dental professional, she strongly believes in prevention and getting her patients to a state of optimal oral health as it portrays one’s overall health, confidence and self-esteem.

     

    Dr. Mansoor, who has a keen interest in all her patients’ wellness, strongly believes that every individual must visit the dentist once in six months to make sure the teeth are healthy.

     

    She works tirelessly to make sure people of all ages have a healthy and good oral hygiene, which will boost their confidence to flash a confident smile, just like her.

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    fitness

    Fitness equipment is hard to find. Here are tricks for buying and selling

    Kyle Bennett’s beat-up, 10-year-old Giant Faith mountain bike sat in his garage unused for months. The industrial designer from Santa Cruz paid $450 for it a year before and had thoroughly thrashed it. So he put it up for sale on Facebook Marketplace.



    diagram: (Steven Banks / Los Angeles Times; Getty)


    © Provided by The LA Times
    (Steven Banks / Los Angeles Times; Getty)

    In one hour, his post got 60 replies.

    Perhaps even more surprising? His asking price was $600.

    “The bike was gone in two hours,” he says. “A guy drove 100 miles and handed me cash, with no bargaining. But if I’d been patient, I easily could have gotten $1,000 for it. People were bidding. In the pandemic, people post bikes for outrageous prices — and are getting them.”

    Today, with gyms mostly closed due to the pandemic, people are desperate to stay fit. But they can’t get new bikes and fitness equipment. Bike shops are all sold out. Buying new dumbbells and weight benches is practically impossible.

    The solution: Go online and buy and sell used stuff.

    There are lots of websites, from bicycle-specific sites like BikeExchange.com, BicyleBluebook.com and PinkBike.com to general sites like Facebook Marketplace, OfferUp.com, CraigsList.org and LetGo.com.

    Cleaning out your garage has never been this lucrative.

    You know that old beach cruiser with flat tires hanging in the rafters that you couldn’t dump for 50 bucks? Now hose it off, pump the tires, shine it up with Pledge and get $250 for it!

    If you’ve got old dumbbells and weight plates lying around, you may be sitting on a gold mine. The going price of $1 a pound jumped to $3 a pound or more when the gyms closed, according to Anthony Duke, a PE teacher and football coach from Murrieta, who has become a weight equipment expert in the last three months while buying and selling on OfferUp.com.

    “Done right, that old $10, 10-pound dumbbell will now get you $35,” he says. “Old weights I bought online for $50 I’ve sold for $500. Two 25-pound bumper plates — which have the rubberized coating that you can drop on the floor — got me $900. The trick is making it look as good as possible.”

    Duke picks up discarded weights anywhere he can — other online sellers, the city dump, trash cans, in the dank corner of garages at estate sales. He paid 20 cents a pound for weights dumped by the Yorba Linda Fire Department. Then the refurbishing begins. He soaks them in vinegar, scrubs with a steel brush and S.O.S. pad to remove rust, spray-paints them black and uses a fat sharpie to paint the raised letters and numbers white. He’ll reupholster $150 weight benches and sell them for $500.

    The same strategy works for bikes. Duke’s next-door neighbor Stephen Nelson, who was a non-cyclist in February, turned himself into an expert rider and mechanic during the pandemic, buying, rehabbing and selling a dozen mountain bikes and beach cruisers on OfferUp.com and LetGo.com.

    “Used bikes are the new

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    health

    Some types of ‘hard work’ actually increase dementia risk, study says

    Physical activity is known to help prevent dementia and disease, but it’s possible that the kind you do makes a difference.

    A new study found that hard physical work not only doesn’t lower the risk of dementia, it increases the risk of developing the disease.

    Researchers found that people who do hard physical work have a 55 percent higher risk of developing dementia than those doing sedentary work.

    “The WHO [World Health Organization] guide to preventing dementia and disease on the whole mentions physical activity as an important factor. But our study suggests that it must be a ‘good’ form of physical activity, which hard physical work is not,” said researcher Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen.

    “Guides from the health authorities should therefore differentiate between physical activity in your spare time and physical activity at work, as there is reason to believe that the two forms of physical activity have opposite effects,” said Nabe-Nielson, an associate professor from the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen.

    Another study from the University of Copenhagen recently showed that a healthy lifestyle can halve the risk of developing dementia.

    Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the National Research Centre for the Working Environment used data from the Copenhagen Male Study, in which 4,721 Danish men reported in the 1970s about the type of work they did for 14 Copenhagen-based companies.

    Over the years, researchers compiled health data on the respondents.

    Now, researchers are collecting more data with the intent to identify healthier ways of doing hard physical work in a way that it has an “exercise effect.”

    “A lot of workplaces have already taken steps to improve the health of their staff. The problem is that it is the most well-educated and resourceful part of the population that uses these initiatives,” said study co-author Andreas Holtermann.

    “Those with a shorter education often struggle with overweight, pain and poor physical fitness, even though they take more steps during the day and to a larger extent use their body as a tool,” said Holtermann, of the National Research Centre for the Working Environment.

    “For workmen, it is not enough, for example, to avoid heavy lifts if they wish to remain in the profession until age 70. People with a shorter education doing manual labour also need to take preventive steps by strengthening the body’s capacity via, for example, exercise and strength training,” Holtermann said in a university news release.

    The research was published recently in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.



    More information

    Visit the Mayo Clinic for more on physical activity.

    Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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    health

    Does Hard Work Help Preserve the Brain? | Health News

    By Cara Murez, HealthDay Reporter

    (HealthDay)

    MONDAY, NOV 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Physical activity is known to help prevent dementia and disease, but it’s possible that the kind you do makes a difference.

    A new study found that hard physical work not only doesn’t lower the risk of dementia, it increases the risk of developing the disease.

    Researchers found that people who do hard physical work have a 55 percent higher risk of developing dementia than those doing sedentary work.

    “The WHO [World Health Organization] guide to preventing dementia and disease on the whole mentions physical activity as an important factor. But our study suggests that it must be a ‘good’ form of physical activity, which hard physical work is not,” said researcher Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen, an associate professor from the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen. “Guides from the health authorities should therefore differentiate between physical activity in your spare time and physical activity at work, as there is reason to believe that the two forms of physical activity have opposite effects.”

    Another study from the University of Copenhagen recently showed that a healthy lifestyle can halve the risk of developing dementia.

    Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the National Research Centre for the Working Environment used data from the Copenhagen Male Study, in which 4,721 Danish men reported in the 1970s about the type of work they did for 14 Copenhagen-based companies. Over the years, researchers compiled health data on the respondents.

    Now, researchers are collecting more data with the intent to identify healthier ways of doing hard physical work in a way that it has an “exercise effect.”

    “A lot of workplaces have already taken steps to improve the health of their staff. The problem is that it is the most well-educated and resourceful part of the population that uses these initiatives. Those with a shorter education often struggle with overweight, pain and poor physical fitness, even though they take more steps during the day and to a larger extent use their body as a tool,” said study co-author Andreas Holtermann, from the National Research Centre for the Working Environment.

    “For workmen, it is not enough, for example, to avoid heavy lifts if they wish to remain in the profession until age 70. People with a shorter education doing manual labour also need to take preventive steps by strengthening the body’s capacity via, for example, exercise and strength training,” Holtermann said in a university news release.

    The research was published recently in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.

    SOURCE: University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, news release, Oct. 26, 2020

    Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

    Source Article

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    health

    Are Trump’s rallies spreading coronavirus? Why it’s hard to know the full impact

    (Reuters) – Stanford University economists estimate that President Donald Trump’s campaign rallies have resulted in 30,000 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19, and likely led to more than 700 deaths overall, according to a paper posted online this weekend.

    FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters from the presidential limousine while departing a campaign rally in Newtown, Pennsylvania, U.S., on October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner/File Photo

    The research, led by B. Douglas Bernheim, chair of economics at Stanford University, analyzed data following 18 Trump rallies held between June 20 and Sept. 22, three of which were indoors. Bernheim said in an email the work relies on statistical methods to infer causation after an event has occurred.

    Infectious disease experts have long suspected that the president’s rallies ahead of the Nov. 3 election might be so-called superspreader events. But so far, scientists have not been able to get a good read on their impact, in part because of a lack of robust contact tracing in many states.

    WHAT IS THE CONCERN?

    In recent months, Trump has held several dozen rallies in states such as Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where coronavirus infection rates were already on the rise.

    At each event, several thousand people were estimated to have participated. While most of the rallies were held outdoors, video footage show that participants gathered in close proximity and many were not wearing masks, creating a risk of spreading the virus as they cheered their candidate on.

    “It’s not a major stretch” to say that large unmasked gatherings are likely to spread the virus, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

    Adalja said the Stanford paper was “suggestive” of spread from the events, but not definitive because it was not based on an investigation of actual cases. That would help confirm whether participants were exposed to the virus at the event, rather than other places where transmission is rampant.

    WHAT DO WE KNOW?

    Minnesota public health officials have attributed four COVID-19 outbreaks and more than 25 cases to Trump rallies held in the state in September and October.

    An additional 11 state health departments contacted by Reuters said they had not been able to trace infections to the rallies, although some, including Michigan and Wisconsin, have determined that individual people who later tested positive for COVID-19 were present at Trump campaign events.

    WHAT DATA ARE NEEDED?

    Disease experts say that rigorous contact tracing from one such large event could help arrive at an accurate prediction of how infectious such rallies can be.

    But the United States has fallen behind other developed countries in this regard, due to a lack of funding and coordination for contact tracing by the Trump administration.

    “The problem is we’ve not done anything to get real numbers,” said Dr. Eric Topol, a genomics expert and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California. Instead, it is subject to conjecture and mathematical models.

    For

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    health

    Explainer: Are Trump’s Rallies Spreading Coronavirus? Why It’s Hard to Know the Full Impact | Top News

    By Julie Steenhuysen and Carl O’Donnell

    (Reuters) – Stanford University economists estimate that President Donald Trump’s campaign rallies have resulted in 30,000 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19, and likely led to more than 700 deaths overall, according to a paper posted online this weekend.

    The research, led by B. Douglas Bernheim, chair of economics at Stanford University, analyzed data following 18 Trump rallies held between June 20 and Sept. 22, three of which were indoors. Bernheim said in an email the work relies on statistical methods to infer causation after an event has occurred.

    Infectious disease experts have long suspected that the president’s rallies ahead of the Nov. 3 election might be so-called superspreader events. But so far, scientists have not been able to get a good read on their impact, in part because of a lack of robust contact tracing in many states.

    In recent months, Trump has held several dozen rallies in states such as Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where coronavirus infection rates were already on the rise.

    At each event, several thousand people were estimated to have participated. While most of the rallies were held outdoors, video footage show that participants gathered in close proximity and many were not wearing masks, creating a risk of spreading the virus as they cheered their candidate on.

    “It’s not a major stretch” to say that large unmasked gatherings are likely to spread the virus, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

    Adalja said the Stanford paper was “suggestive” of spread from the events, but not definitive because it was not based on an investigation of actual cases. That would help confirm whether participants were exposed to the virus at the event, rather than other places where transmission is rampant.

    Minnesota public health officials have attributed four COVID-19 outbreaks and more than 25 cases to Trump rallies held in the state in September and October.

    An additional 11 state health departments contacted by Reuters said they had not been able to trace infections to the rallies, although some, including Michigan and Wisconsin, have determined that individual people who later tested positive for COVID-19 were present at Trump campaign events.

    Disease experts say that rigorous contact tracing from one such large event could help arrive at an accurate prediction of how infectious such rallies can be.

    But the United States has fallen behind other developed countries in this regard, due to a lack of funding and coordination for contact tracing by the Trump administration.

    “The problem is we’ve not done anything to get real numbers,” said Dr. Eric Topol, a genomics expert and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California. Instead, it is subject to conjecture and mathematical models.  

    For example, scientists can use gene sequencing to trace minute changes in the genetic code of the virus as it passes from one person to another, allowing them to develop a map of where the virus travels. Such work has been

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    health

    Oregon could become 1st US state to decriminalize hard drugs

    SALEM, Ore. (AP) — In what would be a first in the U.S., possession of small amounts of heroin, cocaine, LSD and other hard drugs could be decriminalized in Oregon under a ballot measure that voters are deciding on in Tuesday’s election.

    Measure 110 is one of the most watched initiatives in Oregon because it would drastically change how the state’s justice system treats people caught with amounts for their personal use.

    Instead of being arrested, going to trial and facing possible jail time, the users would have the option of paying $100 fines or attending new, free addiction recovery centers.


    The centers would be funded by tax revenue from retail marijuana sales in the state that was the country’s first to decriminalize marijuana possession.

    It may sound like a radical concept even in one of the most progressive U.S. states — but countries including Portugal, the Netherlands and Switzerland have already decriminalized possession of small amounts of hard drugs, according to the United Nations.

    Portugal’s 2000 decriminalization brought no surge in drug use. Drug deaths fell while the number of people treated for drug addiction in the country rose 20% from 2001 to 2008 and then stabilized, Portuguese officials have said.

    The U.N. Chief Executives Board for Coordination, chaired by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, is also advocating a different approach.

    In a 2019 report, the board announced its commitment to “promote alternatives to conviction and punishment in appropriate cases, including the decriminalization of drug possession for personal use.”

    Doing so would also “address prison overcrowding and overincarceration by people accused of drug crimes,” said the board, which is made up of the leaders of all U.N. agencies, funds and other bodies.

    Oregon’s measure is backed by the Oregon Nurses Association, the Oregon chapter of the American College of Physicians and the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians.

    “Punishing people for drug use and addiction is costly and hasn’t worked. More drug treatment, not punishment, is a better approach,” the groups said in a statement.

    Opponents include two dozen district attorneys who urged a no vote, saying the measure “recklessly decriminalizes possession of the most dangerous types of drugs (and) will lead to an increase in acceptability of dangerous drugs.”

    Three other district attorneys back the measure, including the top prosecutor in Oregon’s most populous county, which includes Portland, the state’s largest city.

    “Misguided drug laws have created deep disparities in the justice system,” said Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt. “Arresting people with addictions is a cruel punishment because it slaps them with a lifelong criminal record that can ruin lives.”

    Jimmy Jones, executive director of Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action, a group that helps homeless people, said arresting people who are using but not dealing hard drugs makes life extremely difficult for them.

    “Every time that this happens, not only does that individual enter the criminal justice system but it makes it very difficult for us, on the back end, to house any of these folks because a lot of landlords

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    health

    Top medical advisers arguing hard for tighter coronavirus restrictions

    Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty, the government’s top scientific and medical advisers, are understood to be arguing hard with ministers for tighter restrictions across England ahead of Christmas.



    a man wearing glasses and a suit and tie: Photograph: WPA/Getty Images


    © Provided by The Guardian
    Photograph: WPA/Getty Images

    The pair are calling for tougher measures armed with what has been described as new modelling from experts on Sage, the government’s epidemics advisory group, showing that deaths this winter could exceed those in the spring.

    Just last month, on 21 September, the pair were accused of doom-mongering when they appeared on national television as a double act, warning of the possibility of 50,000 cases and 200 Covid deaths a day by mid-October.

    The measures Boris Johnson announced later that day – closing pubs at 10pm, encouraging working from home and penalties for people who break the rule of six – were supposed to prevent those numbers being reached. But they have not. Deaths have exceeded 200 and even 300 in recent days.

    There is now clear evidence that the trajectory of infections, hospital admissions and deaths is rising steadily , in spite of the tier system of controls on people’s social activities.

    According to some newspapers, the death toll is likely to be higher than it was in the spring. New modelling was said to predict that deaths would plateau, but at a relatively high level even though lower than earlier in the year. That plateau would continue for months. Vallance was said to be pushing for tier 3 restrictions across the whole of England before Christmas.

    The existence of new modelling surprised some members of Sage – although not the conclusions that Vallance and Whitty had reached. The evidence was there in a report that Vallance himself commissioned from the Academy of Medical Sciences in July.

    That report, “Preparing for a Challenging Winter 2020/21” modelled a “reasonable worst-case scenario”, in which the R – the number of people infected by each person with the virus – rose to 1.7. It estimated that almost 120,000 Covid hospital deaths between September this year and June next year, “over double the number that occurred during the first wave in spring 2020”.

    In addition, it warned of further disruption of the NHS and social care, a backlog of non-Covid cases and a possible influenza epidemic. “There is a need for urgent preparation to mitigate the risks of a particularly challenging winter 2020/21,” said the report.

    That preparation should have happened over the summer, said Prof Dame Anne Johnson, president elect of the Academy of Medical Sciences, who was one of the authors.

    “What we suggested in the report was that the time to be really working on suppressing the virus is exactly when it is really low. Keep it down there. And of course we didn’t do that and there were a lot of reasons,” she said.

    “When we came out of lockdown we went very nervously to restaurants. We continued to queue outside shops. Somehow all that effort which wasn’t necessarily about not meeting

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    health

    Autistic individuals may have a hard time wearing a face mask. Here’s how experts help.

    Health experts widely recommend wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of diseases, including COVID-19. Although there are reports of people who defy mask requirements, there are also people who may be struggling with face masks for physical reasons. Adults and children on the autism spectrum may have difficulty wearing masks.

    People with autism may have sensory issues that can either be hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, meaning overactive and underactive, respectively. Face masks can pose a problem for people with hypersensitivity because they may be unable to tolerate having something on their face or the material of the mask itself activates the touch senses to a point that is intolerable.

    This could potentially lead to complications or confrontations in public spaces if masks are required. There are reports of families going shopping and who were asked to leave the store, a special needs student not being able to attend classes and a mother and a 5 year old were taken off a flight because of masks.

    Changing America spoke to experts at Firefly Autism, a nonprofit that provides services to adults and children with autism in Colorado. “The very first thing to always remember when we’re talking about individuals with autism is every single person is completely different,” says Amanda Kelly, who is the Home-Based Programs Director at Firefly Autism. “It’s very hard to say broadly one type of mask is better than another because everybody is entirely individual and completely different.”


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    CDC ‘STRONGLY RECOMMENDS’ ALL PASSENGERS ON PLANES, TRAINS, BUSES WEAR MASKS TO SLOW SPREAD OF COVID-19

    THE COMING WEEKS WILL BE ‘DARKEST OF THE ENTIRE PANDEMIC,’ INFECTIOUS DISEASES EXPERT SAYS

    WISCONSIN REIMPOSES CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS AMID SURGE IN HOSPITALIZATIONS

    ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE COULD GET WORSE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

    PROPOSAL TO LET CORONAVIRUS SPREAD NATURALLY THROUGH US POPULATION INTERESTS WHITE HOUSE, ALARMS MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT


    An initial assessment could help understand what part of wearing a mask is difficult and why. It would also help set a baseline. For example, you can determine if the person can tolerate touching a mask, putting it on and wearing it for a few seconds.

    A parent could introduce masks of varying styles and materials and see what the child chooses. Then, they could practice wearing the mask for short intervals. “We always want to make sure that we’re being very very clear with our expectations and explaining everything ahead of time,” says Kelly.

    “Then the idea really is to just try and very strategically build tolerance,” says Kelly. “It might be very very small increments of time the person will tolerate having the mask on.” She suggests giving positive reinforcement along the way. Sesame Street made a video for children with autism to help them practice wearing a mask.

    After tolerance has been built up, then you can begin practicing. For example, you can take a short trip to a public space with low stakes, like going to a drive through to get an ice cream. Eventually, they

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