harassment

fitness

Fitness coach calls to fight against street harassment after experience at Navotas City park

A female fitness coach is calling on the public to stand against street harassment after her experience at a park in Navotas City last week.

(Photo courtesy of Seannah Swift)

“Street harassment is about power, there is no right or wrong response when you’re already in a situation. Just do something for yourself, show assertiveness and strength. Ask for help if you need to. Be also vigilant if ever you will be put in a situation like what I’ve experienced. Be alert and think of the best way to save yourself,” coach Seannah Swift said in a Facebook post.

This came after Swift shared her experience while jogging at the Navotas Centennial Park on November 7 when three unidentified men, two of which were apparently minors, “physically” harassed her through “bumping on” her “left boob” and trying to intimidate her.

“What happened…was a physical harassment. Start of my training, 5:34pm… Just seconds after I turned on the GPS on my watch, someone’s shoulder bumped really hard on my chest. He hit my left boob,” she said.

Seeing the man, Swift said, she tried to avoid him after “perceiv[ing] what was in his mind” but he still blocked her “way and dang…. He was with two other guys, ages are around 16 to 20.”

“I knew it was a plan,” she continued in mixed English and Filipino. “The moment I felt I was harassed, I pushed him and punched. He got speechless for few seconds, finally he said ‘You’re brave, Miss, aren’t you?… ‘What I did was unintentional.’ [But] I stood tall and acted brave, ‘What you did was intentional, are you insane? [while] showing my fist ‘Are you going to fight?’”

After the confrontation, Swift said, she continued her activity while the men walked away.

However, moments later, she said, she saw the men again “approaching” her.

“I slowed down. I thought if I continue running fast he might suddenly stab me then jump off to the sea. So I slowed down, jogged towards where they were as there is no other way for a reroute. The same guy blocked my way for the second time, I stopped but kept a distance.” she said.

“Paulit ulit silang nagsorry but body language is giving me a hint that they are trapping me. ‘Yong isa umiikot sa likod ko (They kept apologizing but their body language was giving me a hint that they would trap me. One of them was already going behind me),” she added.

Luckily, two police officers in civilian clothing witnessed the incident and intervened.

Although the three men managed to escape, Swift expressed her gratitude to the police officers for their assistance. She said, the lawmen even tried to chase the harassers and launched a manhunt against them, but they already jumped off the Manila Bay. 

“I hope that this will serve as a warning to many harassers who think that a simple bump or catcall can be set aside. It is against women’s rights and against the

Read More
medicine

It’s time to map medicine’s sexual and gender harassment iceberg

Gender harassment happens every day in health care organizations, academic medicine, research labs, and other corners of the science, technology, engineering, and math worlds. It’s largely hidden — except to those experiencing it — unlike its more egregious counterpart, sexual harassment, which often makes headlines.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) describe gender harassment as “verbal and nonverbal behaviors that convey hostility, objectification, exclusion, or second-class status.” It undermines women, exhausts and demoralizes them, and strips them of their motivation, eventually driving them out of the workforce.

As women physicians working in academic medicine, we know this firsthand.

advertisement

With five of our colleagues, we filed a federal lawsuit in 2019 alleging sex, age, and race discrimination by Mount Sinai Health System and four of its male employees, including the dean of the medical school. (Editor’s note: All the documents are public, and the defendants have denied any wrongdoing.)

As our complaint details, we left Mount Sinai emotionally and psychologically scarred after being demeaned by male leadership, denied promotions, underpaid compared to male colleagues, and systematically gaslit by internal reporting structures that were meant to protect us. We were demoted from leadership positions and assigned menial tasks, such as managing a Mailchimp subscription list. Some of us were ignored and frozen out of important work streams, and were forbidden to meet alone with longtime colleagues and mentors. Members of our group were referred to as “bitches” and “cunts” by our colleagues without any repercussions. Those are just a few of the forms of mistreatment we endured at Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health.

advertisement

We believed that our hard work and years of service to the institution would protect us and allow us to be measured on our merits. Instead we struck the “iceberg of sexual harassment,” and it sank our careers.

A 2018 NASEM report on sexual harassment in academic sciences, engineering, and medicine introduced the analogy of an iceberg to describe harassment in these fields. Sexual assault and coercion are the visible and appalling tip of the iceberg. People recognize their severity and the personal damage they wreak, the media often cover these stories, and perpetrators are sometimes held accountable. Gender harassment, in contrast is the huge mass below the surface, largely unseen but nonetheless ruinous.

iceberg_infographic harassment
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Women in health care rarely report harassment due to the risk of retaliation. Compounding this, the internal systems that should assist employees all too often make protecting perpetrators and institutional reputations their top priority. Our meetings with Mount Sinai human resources representatives were humiliating and degrading, providing neither safety nor protection, as we recount in our complaint. In one meeting, they referred to a book on “why women think they are being discriminated against when they are not.” Because of these systemic failures, the legal route was our only resort.

Since filing our lawsuit, we are seeing the enormity of the iceberg. Scores of doctors, nurses, staff, and medical students

Read More