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Pregnant Sadie Robertson Says She Was ‘Very Sick’ with COVID-19 but ‘Baby Huff Is Doing Great’

Sadie Robertson is on the mend after contracting the coronavirus.

On Monday, the Duck Dynasty alum, 23, shared a photo from her hospital bed, revealing in her caption that “one of the most challenging things” she has faced as of late has been her battle with COVID-19, which made her “very sick.”

“I know everyone experiences covid differently, but wow these symptoms are wild. I’ve definitely struggled through this one!” she wrote. “Thankfully baby Huff is doing great and healthy, and I am now healing as well. I’m no longer in the hospital (this pic was not from today) and I have just about fully recovered.”

Robertson, who is currently expecting her first child with husband Christian Huff, was diagnosed with coronavirus earlier this month.

“I’ve learned a lot and I have been challenged in a lot of new ways,” she said. “I will say my dependency on Jesus has never felt greater in some of the hardest moment of this sickness. I’m thankful I serve a savior who is with me in these moments that feel rather lonely. My heart and my [family’s] heart goes out to everyone suffering with Covid.”

Related: Sadie Robertson expecting first child with husband

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RELATED: Pregnant Women Seem Unlikely to Pass Coronavirus to Their Babies, Early Studies Show

As the coronavirus continues to spread in the United States, many pregnant women are wondering what they can do to stay as safe as possible and limit their potential for exposure.

In an advisory on their website, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends expectant mothers to be extra vigilant about following existing precautions, as “available data suggest that pregnant women with COVID-19 may be at increased risk for more severe illness compared with nonpregnant peers.”

While “No increase in the rate of mortality has been noted,” the group says that “these data indicate an elevated risk of [intensive care unit] admissions and mechanical ventilation.”

“Pregnant patients with comorbidities such as obesity and gestational diabetes may be at an even higher risk for severe illness consistent with the general population with similar comorbidities,” the ACOG adds.

Huff and Robertson shared their pregnancy news Oct. 4, on their respective Instagram accounts. “SCREAMING WITH EXCITEMENT TO SHARE THIS NEWS! Baby we already adore you,” the mom-to-be captioned a photo of the pair cuddled up on the couch and showcasing their sonogram, in part.

The couple opened up Wednesday on Robertson’s WHOA That’s Good Podcast about learning the good news, with Huff, 22, saying they weren’t “not trying.”  Noted Robertson, “I guess we shouldn’t have been that surprised, but we were super surprised and so I didn’t think I was pregnant at all.”

After she found herself “ravenous” all day and had a vivid dream about being pregnant (with a son!),

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health

COVID Spikes Worsen Health Worker Shortages in Great Plains, Rocky Mountains | Healthiest Communities

COVID-19 cases are surging in rural places across the Mountain States and Midwest, and when it hits health care workers, ready reinforcements aren’t easy to find.

In Montana, pandemic-induced staffing shortages have shuttered a clinic in the state’s capital, led a northwestern regional hospital to ask employees exposed to COVID-19 to continue to work and emptied a health department 400 miles to the east.

“Just one more person out and we wouldn’t be able to keep the surgeries going,” said Dr. Shelly Harkins, chief medical officer of St. Peter’s Health in Helena, a city of roughly 32,000 where cases continue to spread. “When the virus is just all around you, it’s almost impossible to not be deemed a contact at some point. One case can take out a whole team of people in a blink of an eye.”

In North Dakota, where cases per resident are growing faster than any other state, hospitals may once again curtail elective surgeries and possibly seek government aid to hire more nurses if the situation gets worse, North Dakota Hospital Association President Tim Blasl said.

“How long can we run at this rate with the workforce that we have?” Blasl said. “You can have all the licensed beds you want, but if you don’t have anybody to staff those beds, it doesn’t do you any good.”

Photos: Daily Life, Disrupted

TOPSHOT - A passenger in an outfit (R) poses for a picture as a security guard wearing a facemask as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 coronavirus stands nearby on a last century-style boat, featuring a theatrical drama set between the 1920s and 1930s in Wuhan, in Chinas central Hubei province on September 27, 2020. (Photo by Hector RETAMAL / AFP) (Photo by HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP via Getty Images)

The northern Rocky Mountains, Great Plains and Upper Midwest are seeing the highest surge of COVID-19 cases in the nation, as some residents have ignored recommendations for curtailing the virus, such as wearing masks and avoiding large gatherings. Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa and Wisconsin have recently ranked among the top 10 U.S. states in confirmed cases per 100,000 residents over a seven-day period, according to an analysis by The New York Times.

Such coronavirus infections — and the quarantines that occur because of them — are exacerbating the health care worker shortage that existed in these states well before the pandemic. Unlike in the nation’s metropolitan hubs, these outbreaks are scattered across hundreds of miles. And even in these states’ biggest cities, the ranks of medical professionals are in short supply. Specialists and registered nurses are sometimes harder to track down than ventilators, N95 masks or hospital beds. Without enough care providers, patients may not be able to get the medical attention they need.

Hospitals have asked staffers to cover extra shifts and learn new skills. They have brought in temporary workers from other parts of the country and transferred some patients to less-crowded hospitals. But, at St. Peter’s Health, if the hospital’s one kidney doctor gets sick or is told to quarantine, Harkins doesn’t expect to find a backup.

“We make a point to not have excessive staff because we have an obligation to keep the cost of health care down for a community — we just don’t have a lot of slack in our rope,” Harkins said. “What we don’t account for is a mass exodus

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medicine

Cyanobacteria: Small candidates as great hopes for medicine and biotechnology

IMAGE

IMAGE: The team headed by Dr Paul D’Agostino will sequence 40 symbiotic and rare terrestrial cyanobacteria for the production of new active agents and to explore the potential for applications in…
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Credit: Paul D’Agostino

In order to unlock the genetic potential of unusual cyanobacteria for the production of new active agents and to explore the potential for applications in biotechnology, the team headed by Dr Paul D’Agostino has been awarded a competitive whole-genome sequencing grant from the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) in the USA.

An ever-growing global population, an increasing standard of living and environmental challenges such as anthropogenic climate change, ocean pollution, the declining availability of arable land and dwindling fossil resources – these are today’s global challenges. Therefore, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has dedicated the Science Year 2020/21 to the topic Bioeconomy with the aim of meeting these challenges with little heroes. The “stars” of bioeconomy are proteins, algae, microorganisms, and other tiny creatures with great impact.

At the Chair of Technical Biochemistry at TU Dresden, the researchers will now focus on some of the oldest of such little superheroes: cyanobacteria. There are about 2000 species of cyanobacteria and many of these species have been poorly researched. Dr Paul D’Agostino, Professor Tobias Gulder and their team – including cooperation partners Michelle Gehringer (TU Kaiserslautern), Michael Lakatos and Patrick Jung (both Hochschule Kaiserslautern) – hope that unusual cyanobacteria will yield promising results and make an innovative contribution to bioeconomy.

“Microorganisms produce valuable organic molecules with great potential for many applications. It is important to know that unusual organisms often also produce novel bioactive agents. The discovery of such new, bioactive molecules is essential if one thinks, for example, of new medical challenges such as the coronavirus and the progressive development of resistance to established active agents. Within the scope of this project, we therefore want to investigate the genetic potential of very unusual cyanobacteria for the production of innovative active pharmaceutical ingredients,” explains Gulder.

As a first step, the team will predict the potential of natural compounds by sequencing the genomes and subsequent bioinformatic analysis.

The results can then be translated into the targeted discovery of new molecules using modern methods of synthetic biology and biotechnology. As a final step, the project will focus on the production and characterization of these natural compounds and on the application of the enzymes producing these compounds as biocatalysts for the development of sustainable chemical processes.

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medicine

Small candidates as great hopes for medicine and biotechnology

Cyanobacteria: Small Candidates as Great Hopes for Medicine and Biotechnology
The team headed by Dr Paul D’Agostino will sequence 40 symbiotic and rare terrestrial cyanobacteria for the production of new active agents and to explore the potential for applications in biotechnology. Credit: Paul D’Agostino

An ever-growing global population, an increasing standard of living and environmental challenges such as anthropogenic climate change, ocean pollution, the declining availability of arable land and dwindling fossil resources—these are today’s global challenges. Therefore, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has dedicated the Science Year 2020/21 to the topic Bioeconomy with the aim of meeting these challenges with little heroes. The ‘stars’ of bioeconomy are proteins, algae, microorganisms, and other tiny creatures with great impact.


At the Chair of Technical Biochemistry at TU Dresden, the researchers will now focus on some of the oldest of such little superheroes: cyanobacteria. There are about 2000 species of cyanobacteria and many of these species have been poorly researched. Dr. Paul D’Agostino, Professor Tobias Gulder and their team—including cooperation partners Michelle Gehringer (TU Kaiserslautern), Michael Lakatos and Patrick Jung (both Hochschule Kaiserslautern) – hope that unusual cyanobacteria will yield promising results and make an innovative contribution to bioeconomy.

“Microorganisms produce valuable organic molecules with great potential for many applications. It is important to know that unusual organisms often also produce novel bioactive agents. The discovery of such new, bioactive molecules is essential if one thinks, for example, of new medical challenges such as the coronavirus and the progressive development of resistance to established active agents. Within the scope of this project, we therefore want to investigate the genetic potential of very unusual cyanobacteria for the production of innovative active pharmaceutical ingredients,” explains Gulder.

As a first step, the team will predict the potential of natural compounds by sequencing the genomes and subsequent bioinformatic analysis. The results can then be translated into the targeted discovery of new molecules using modern methods of synthetic biology and biotechnology. As a final step, the project will focus on the production and characterization of these natural compounds and on the application of the enzymes producing these compounds as biocatalysts for the development of sustainable chemical processes.


Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month


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fitness

Fitness wise, I feel great: Pulisic offers positive update

London [UK], October 22 (ANI): Chelsea star Christian Pulisic has offered a positive update on his fitness, saying that he feels great as he seeks to rediscover his long lost form.

The 22-year-old has struggled to find his mojo back and untimely injuries have also pegged him back.

Pulisic had witnessed a hamstring problem and it saw him miss the 2020 FA Cup final against Arsenal.

“Fitness-wise I feel great. I’m getting back to where I was, I feel strong, I feel like I can play 90 minutes, and I’m happy,” Pulisic told Chelsea TV.

Chelsea played out a 0-0 draw against Sevilla in the Champions League on Wednesday and Pulisic termed this particular game as “tough”.

“It was definitely a tough game. It was one of those where there were not a lot of chances in the game, a really hard-fought match, we did a lot of good defending, and I think we can walk away proud with a point,” Pulisic said.

“They’re a strong team. They put us to the test, they moved the ball really well and we definitely defended a lot. It’s everyone’s job to be behind the ball at times,” he added.

Chelsea will next take on Manchester United in the Premier League 2020-21 season on Saturday, October 24.

The Blues are currently at the eighth position in the points table with eight points from five matches. (ANI)

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health

Pandemic Putting Americans Under Great Mental Strain: Poll | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) — COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation’s mental health, according to an American Psychological Association (APA) poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really struggling, the poll revealed.

Respondents from Generation Z (those born since 1996), pegged their stress level in the past month at a 6 on 10-point scale in which 1 represented “little to no stress” and 10 was “a great deal of stress.” That compared with an average stress level of 5 among all adults.

Nineteen percent of adults said their mental health is worse than it was a year ago.

That included 34% of Gen Z adults; 19% of millennials (born 1977-1995); 21% of Gen Xers (born 1965-1976); 12% of baby boomers (born 1946-1964); and 8% of those born before 1946.

Gen Z adults were the most likely to report common signs of depression.

More than 7 in 10 said that in the last two weeks they were so tired that they sat around and did nothing, felt very restless, found it hard to think or concentrate, felt lonely, or felt miserable or unhappy.

“This survey confirms what many mental health experts have been saying since the start of the pandemic: Our mental health is suffering from the compounding stressors in our lives,” said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the APA.

“This compounding stress will have serious health and social consequences if we don’t act now to reduce it,” he said in an association news release.

Evans noted that the youngest Americans are showing signs of serious mental health issues, including depression and anxiety.

The poll found that changes to school are a big stressor for Gen Zers. More than 8 of 10 teens said they have had negative impacts of school closures, and 51% said planning for the future seems impossible.

Among college students, 67% feel the same way about planning for the future. And 87% of Gen Z members in college said school is a significant source of stress.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said survey researcher Emma Adam, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Adam said public policy must address this generation’s need for social, emotional and mental health supports as well as financial assistance and educational and work opportunities. “Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation,” she said.

But most Americans aren’t getting the support they need. Among adults, 61% said they could use

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health

Who Are the Scientists Behind the Great Barrington Declaration?

After the authors of a declaration promoting herd immunity spoke to White House officials last week, the scientific community immediately called into question the declaration as well as the scientists who wrote it.

The Great Barrington Declaration, a statement written by three public health experts from Harvard, Stanford, and Oxford, encourages governments to lift lockdown restrictions on young and healthy people while focusing protection measures on the elderly. This would allow COVID-19 to spread in a population where it is less likely to be deadly, the authors state, encouraging widespread immunity that is not dependent on a vaccine.

Restrictions have caused other harms, including lower childhood vaccination rates, worsening cardiovascular disease outcomes, fewer cancer screenings, and deteriorating mental health, they argue.

After gaining some publicity, this strategy was strongly denounced by many in the scientific community. While it supposedly received 8,000 signatures from public health experts and doctors, news outlets later revealed that some of those signatures were fake.

The declaration was sponsored by the American Institute for Economic Research, a libertarian, free-market think tank headquartered in western Massachusetts. The Institute is in a network of organizations funded by Charles Koch — a right-wing billionaire known for promoting climate change denial and opposing regulations on business.

While the scientists who wrote the declaration claim they represent both right- and left-wing politics, all have attempted to influence governments to end lockdowns since the start of the pandemic.

Here’s a look at the three scientists behind the Great Barrington Declaration. MedPage Today reached out to them for comment but none responded.

Jay Bhattacharya, MD, PhD

Bhattacharya, a professor of medicine and economics at Stanford University, was an early vocal opponent of coronavirus lockdowns beginning in early March.

In a March 24 opinion piece published in the Wall Street Journal when statewide lockdowns were beginning, Bhattacharya and a co-author questioned the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic, stating that universal quarantines may not be worth the costs to the economy, social life, and population health.

Along with John Ioannidis, MD, DSC, of Stanford, Bhattacharya co-authored the Santa Clara antibody seroprevalence study, a preprint published in April that suggested coronavirus infections (and possibly, immunity) were up to 85 times higher than scientists originally thought. The study, which became a tool in the political debate to reopen the economy, was criticized for lacking sound evidence. It was later revealed by BuzzFeed News that the study received funding from the founder of JetBlue, which the authors hadn’t disclosed.

In early September, President Trump stated that the U.S. case fatality rate for COVID-19 dropped 85% since April, because of the “groundbreaking therapies” pioneered under Operation Warp Speed (though the only authorized treatment supported by the program is convalescent plasma). Bhattacharya was cited as the source of the data showing the fatality rate reduction — which can be attributed to more testing, improved protection measures in nursing homes, and some new treatments, according to PolitiFact.

Bhattacharya is also a former research fellow at the Hoover Institution, a conservative

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