good

dentist

Brushing your teeth too hard will do more damage than good, says aesthetic dentist Angel Mansoor

angel1

General and aesthetic dentist Angel Mansoor.

Niloufar Saleem, Staff Reporter

 

Too much harshness while brushing teeth does more damage than good, says Dr. Angel Mansoor, a general and aesthetic dentist, in an exclusive Facebook Live interview with Gulf Today in Dubai on Sunday.

 

Dr. Angel Mansoor, a consultant at the 7 Dimensions Medical Centre in Dubai, is a dentist who strives to provide her patients with quality dental treatment pertaining to both naturally aesthetic and biologically functional needs.

 

As a certified invasalign provider, Dr. Mansoor highly recommends choosing invasalign in comparison to the traditional method as it is easier, hassle free and looks almost invisible, which ends up giving the patient more confidence on how they look, overall.

 

She speaks about how other than working faster, invasalign is also a method that is suitable for everyone.

 

Dr. Mansoor also goes on to dispels some myths that people have regarding general dental care.

 

She insists on brushing twice a day and not ignoring the use of a dental floss.

 

The only thing that can be consumed after the night brushing is water, she says.

 

She also speaks on how not flossing regularly can damage almost 36 per cent of the teeth.

 

Dr. Mansoor sheds some light on how overlooking regular stains on the teeth can end up in a painful case of plaque or cavity.

 


READ MORE

 

Experts suggest to hold-off pregnancy plans till virus is contained

 

PAD hosts health awareness camp

 

Ajman Police launch health initiative

 


She also insists on getting a panaromic X-ray in every first visit to the dentist as it helps examine the teeth, gums and some hidden issues, which can end up causing damage in the future.

 

As a dental professional, she strongly believes in prevention and getting her patients to a state of optimal oral health as it portrays one’s overall health, confidence and self-esteem.

 

Dr. Mansoor, who has a keen interest in all her patients’ wellness, strongly believes that every individual must visit the dentist once in six months to make sure the teeth are healthy.

 

She works tirelessly to make sure people of all ages have a healthy and good oral hygiene, which will boost their confidence to flash a confident smile, just like her.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read More
fitness

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp eager for good news as Naby Keita suffers injury

Jurgen Klopp has more injury worries
Jurgen Klopp has more injury worries

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp will be hoping for some good news on the fitness of midfielders Thiago Alcantara and Jordan Henderson in the next 24 hours after being struck down by yet more injury problems.

The defending Premier League champions underlined their enduring quality and will to win with a comfortable 3-0 victory over Leicester – setting a new club record of 64 unbeaten league matches at home – despite missing 10 members of his first-team squad.

But just as Klopp got Fabinho back from a three-week lay-off with a hamstring problem to play as an emergency centre-back he lost fellow midfielder Naby Keita to a similar injury.

And midfielder Xherdan Shaqiri did not even make the squad after it was discovered he had returned from international duty with yet another muscle problem.

With Wednesday’s Champions League visit of Atalanta offering the chance to secure qualification to the knockout phase with two matches still to play Klopp will hope either or both of Henderson, who came back from England duty with a thigh problem, and Thiago, having been sidelined by a knee problem since mid-October, can be available as he is still without Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, who has not played after a knee injury in pre-season.

Without him his midfield options look fairly slim as, with James Milner filling in at right-back for the injured Trent Alexander-Arnold, 19-year-old academy graduate Leighton Clarkson made his first appearance in a match day squad against the Foxes after they learned of Shaqiri’s unavailability.

“Shaq had a muscle injury with the national team which he didn’t really realise,” said Klopp.

“He trained with us, we gave him a day off and then he came back and was involved in the session, but was not fully involved.

“After that he felt a little bit (of a problem). Then we did a scan and they found he has an injury from five or six days ago.

“Nobody knew about that, not even Shaq knew about it, but that’s how things sometimes are and so he was not able to be involved.

Mohamed Salah is likely to return to the squad after a negative Covid-19 test having tested positive on international duty with Egypt but in his absence summer signing Diogo Jota continued his hot streak.

A seventh goal in his last six club appearances saw him become the first Liverpool player to score in his first four home top-flight appearances.

“Yes, he’s a good player – that’s the reason why we signed him,” was Klopp’s assessment.

Leicester manager Brendan Rodgers has injury problems of his own, although not to the extent of his successor at Liverpool.

He had hoped to have left-back Timothy Castagne back for the trip to Anfield but the Belgium international suffered a minor set-back in his recovery from a thigh injury.

“He had a few good

Read More
dentist

ANYONE KNOW A GOOD CHILDRENS DENTIST IN ARE FOR A 6 YEAR OLD???

St. Peter’s Church is hosting a Food Drive this Saturday, October 24th. Please help them help others!

It does not seem possible, but the Holiday Season and the winter months are quickly approaching. This is a time of year when food pantries struggle to provide for the needs of the community. This year, because of the Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting increase in the number of our neighbors suffering from layoffs and job loss, our local food pantry is facing a crisis. With so much need, they are finding their resources severely depleted.

In response to this growing need, the Historic Downtown Frankfort businesses will be having a food drive “How We Can” October1 thru November 11. On Saturday, October 24, from 9:00am-12:00pm, in cooperation with our local businesses St. Peter’s United Church of Christ (12 West Sauk Trail, Frankfort, IL 60423, 815-469-2220) will be having a food drop off drive where people can drive thru to drop off their donations. All food and money collected will go directly to the Frankfort Township Food Pantry to help serve the needs of our neighbors.

Please place your donations in the trunk/hatchback of your vehicle. To provide safety for all, masked and gloved volunteers will take your donations so that you need not leave your vehicle. We will also have volunteers, masked and gloved, with buckets to collect your monetary contributions if you so choose.

Please tell your friends and neighbors and encourage them to be a part of this community-wide effort to serve those in our community that find themselves in need of our help.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Dismantling structural racism in medicine is good for us all

Dr. Rachel Issaka on how to add more diversity to the medical industry. #newdaynw

SEATTLE — Structural racism impacts almost every aspect of our life, even the medical field. Fred Hutch physician, Dr. Rachel Issaka, talked with us about how structural racism affects both doctors of color and patients.

“It’s not the racism between people, but the racism built-in and baked into our society by policies and practices that advantage one group and lead to another group’s disadvantage,” explained gastroenterologist, Dr. Rachel Issaka.

Dr, Issaka’s essay Good for Us All, posted on JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association), she shared an experience with a patient who had a hard time accepting that she was one of the physicians on the team.

“When I introduced myself by my name and title as other members of my team had done, and after they had acknowledged, it was to tell me, ‘good for you’,” recalled Dr. Issaka. “The reason is, because within the healthcare field, for generations, white men were the picture of who a doctor looks like.”

Structural racism and the lack of diversity in the medical industry also brings disadvantages to patients, especially for underrepresented people. For example, obesity is a risk factor for colon cancer, and black people are at higher risk for obesity.

“Black people are less likely to get the most recent cutting edge treatment once they are diagnosed. And they are less likely to also get follow-up surveillance treatment (care after a patient has been cured),” said Dr. Issaka.

“So, all of that translates to black people being 20% more likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and 40 % more likely to die from colon cancer.” 

This example applies across the spectrum in multiple diseases with multiple different diverse groups in this country.

By writing her Good for Us All essay, Dr. Issaka hopes to bring attention to the racial issues in the medical field, to change the conversation, to push us all to begin to talk about the impact of racism in medicine, and to urge everybody to do something to fix it.

Dr. Issaka shared how we can help add diversity to the medical industry:

  • Pipeline program
  • Investment to Black Medical School
  • Make sure Black Faculty Members are successful

Segment Producer Gloria Angelin. Watch New Day Northwest 11 AM weekdays on KING 5 and streaming live on KING5.com. Contact New Day.    

Source Article

Read More
health

Masks Good, Ventilation Better at Cutting COVID Risk at Indoor Events: Study | Top News

BERLIN (Reuters) – Face masks and limits on numbers are important, but good ventilation technology is the most essential ingredient of all in reducing the risk of the coronavirus spreading at public events indoors, according to a German study.

And researchers say the study’s results have implications for containing the epidemic among the broader population too.

Around 1,500 volunteers with face masks, hand sanitiser and proximity trackers attended an indoor pop-concert in Leipzig in August to assess how the virus spreads in large gatherings.

Reseachers simulated three scenarios with varying numbers of spectators and social-distancing standards, and created a computer model of the arena to analyse the flow of aerosols from infected virtual spectators.

“The most important finding for us was understanding how crucial it is to have good ventilation technology. This is key to lowering the risk of infection,” said Stefan Moritz, leader of the RESTART-19 study at the University Medical School in Halle.

The study also found that reducing venue capacity, having multiple arena entrances and seating spectators can have a major impact on the number of contacts people accumulate.

Its recommendations include only allowing food to be eaten at seats, open-air waiting areas, mask-wearing for the concert’s duration and employing stewards to make sure people stick to hygiene rules.

Researchers also developed an epidemiological model to analyse the impact of staging an event on the spread of the virus among the broader population.

They found hygiene measures such as mask-wearing and social-distancing should remain in place as long as the pandemic persists, while seating plans and number of guests should be adjusted based on the incidence of the virus.

“Events have the potential to fuel the epidemic by spreading pathogens, but if a hygiene concept is stuck to then the risk is very low,” said Rafael Mikolajczyk, from Halle University’s Institute for Medical Epidemiology.

The study’s results have not yet been peer-reviewed.

(Reporting by Caroline Copley; editing by John Stonestreet)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

How to Find a Good Dentist | Patient Advice

Karen Vasso, a 43-year old farmer from Chelmsford, Massachusetts, takes good care of her health. In addition to the copious amounts of physical exercise she gets while working, she’s an avid swimmer and triathlete, who’s completed a few solo 12.5-mile swims around Key West in Florida. She also has a background in nutrition and knows that good dental health is an important aspect of overall wellness. She’s long sought to make visiting a dentist regularly a priority. However, a couple of bad experiences over the years have caused her to think carefully about what makes a good dentist and how to find the right one for her.

The first incident occurred several years ago. At the time, Vasso was a single mother and her health insurance wasn’t terribly robust, so her options of which dentist she could see were limited. “I went to this quiet, dark office in the basement of a building” in a nearby town. The office was mostly empty, save for the dentist himself, and Vasso recalls thinking, “this is scary.” Undeterred by her gut intuition, she went through with the appointment. “He cleaned my teeth and at the end he said, ‘you have a cavity. I’m going to need you to come back for a filling.’ I know my teeth. I have extensive knowledge about nutrition and how that affects dental health,” and she says she suspected she didn’t actually have a cavity.

She asked the dentist to show her on the X-ray where the cavity was. “He kind of backed out of it. He had nothing, so I left and never went back. Because he was the only dentist my insurance covered, I didn’t go to the dentist for several years,” she says.

Fast forward a few years to a new town and new health insurance, and Vasso decided it was time to do something about the lack of routine dental care she’d had for the past couple of years and scheduled an appointment with a local dentist. She opted for “a very big chain dental practice” that was in her insurance plan and made an appointment for a cleaning. “They did a cleaning and a cursory exam and told me I had six cavities. It blew my mind – there’s no way I have six cavities,” she says, feeling outraged.

RELATED CONTENT

Before she was even able to get clarification on where and how severe these cavities were, she’d been herded to the front desk to settle her bill and make several more appointments for additional dental work. Vasso decided she didn’t trust that dentist and made an appointment elsewhere for a second opinion. As suspected, that subsequent dentist confirmed she had no cavities at all, let alone six of them. “Can you imagine them drilling into my teeth for no reason? It blows my mind,” she says.

While Vasso’s experience may be extreme, it illustrates how important it is to find a dentist you can trust. “The dentist has an obligation to be

Read More
medicine

Protect Good Medicine, Stop the Censorship of Good Counseling

An increasing number of children, both here in America and around the globe, are experiencing deep discomfort, confusion, and alienation from their sexed body, a condition known as gender dysphoria. Unsurprisingly, people disagree about how best to respond to this condition in order to help these kids. How we navigate that disagreement will prove critical.

Some people insist that the proper course of action involves experimental interventions directed at the boy or girl’s body itself—puberty-blocking drugs, cross-sex hormones, and surgery. Others suggest that therapy be directed to the child’s thoughts and feelings, not the body.

Physical interventions on minors to “affirm” a mistaken “gender identity” violate sound medical ethics and should be prohibited. And yet, in all fifty states, such interventions are entirely legal.

At the same time, a more radical movement is seeking to make it illegal to use a psychological approach to help these children rather than a hormonal and surgical one. An increasing number of jurisdictions—both in the US and in other countries—are banning therapy that aims to help minors with gender dysphoria feel comfortable about their own bodies without transforming their bodies. Federal legislation has been introduced that would create nationwide censorship of such therapy, and the UN has claimed that such therapy violates human rights.

This turns medical ethics—and the law—upside down. Good therapy should never be prohibited. Children deserve access to the therapeutic assistance they need to feel comfortable being what they are as a plain and ineradicable matter of biological fact: male or female. And parents have a natural right to seek this care for their children.

What’s Wrong with Therapy Bans

Some argue that any attempt to help children feel comfortable and thrive as the sex they are, without transforming their bodies, is not good medicine, and they accuse practitioners of using abusive, harmful techniques. But they never provide credible evidence, and the therapy bans they support don’t target harmful practices. Instead, they prohibit working toward goals and outcomes that sexual progressive activists oppose. That is, these therapy bans aren’t focused on techniques that cause harm, but on certain objectives being sought—namely, being comfortable with one’s body.

As a result, one-on-one counseling to help a teen struggling with body image due to anorexia would be permitted, but the very same counseling would be prohibited if the goal is to help a teen struggling with body image due to gender dysphoria.

Activists use emotionally charged language, labelling all such techniques “conversion therapy.” They do not apply this label only to certain discredited techniques (such as electro-shock therapies), but to any therapeutic service—including basic talk therapy—to help a gender dysphoric youth feel comfortable without “transitioning.” Their argument is that if the true “gender identity” of the child is not being “affirmed,” then the child is being harmed. They claim that if a boy who “identifies” as a girl is helped to be comfortable with his actual and unalterable bodily sex, then “conversion therapy” is taking place—regardless of the counseling techniques deployed.

What

Read More
medicine

Bilingualism is good medicine for the brain

Shortly after Kathy Jones relocated to California, the retired professor decided she needed to learn to speak Spanish.



Staying Well Bilingual Brain for Wellness_00000020.jpg


© Provided by CNN
Staying Well Bilingual Brain for Wellness_00000020.jpg

“When I moved to San Diego, I would see all these young kids, mostly Latino kids, who could speak perfect Spanish and perfect English. And switch, back and forth, with fluidity. And I saw that and I don’t know why, but I said to myself, I want to be able to do that,” she says.

Jones looked forward to her weekly Spanish class, but what she really loved was the extracurricular activities organized by her teachers at the Culture and Language Center in San Diego.

“Before the pandemic, we had meet-ups for coffee, parties, craft workshops and excursions all over Latin America — all totally in Spanish. We haven’t been able to do any of that since March.”

Jones is still keeping up with her classes, but they’re all online now. Her classmate is a friend who lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, and their teacher is based in Tijuana. Her online sessions are providing some much-needed social interaction while Jones and her husband hunker down in their San Diego home.

The benefits

Since Jones has been such a dedicated pupil, she’s almost reached fluency. And that could be good for her brain.

Some of the most compelling research on bilingualism and aging comes from Ellen Bialystok of York University in Toronto.

She found that bilinguals are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four to five years later than their monolingual counterparts.

“The more you use another language, the better you get at it. Well, that’s not surprising, but along with that, the more you use two languages, the more your brain subtly rewires,” she says.

And when it comes to the beneficial effects bilingualism has on the brain, education levels do not matter. In fact, the most profound effects were found in people who were illiterate and had no education. Bilingualism was their only real source of mental stimulation, and as they got older, it provided protection for their aging brains.

Tamar Gollan of the University of California San Diego Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center explains it this way: “Bilingualism doesn’t prevent you from getting Alzheimer’s disease; it doesn’t prevent brain damage from happening if you have the disease. What it does is it makes you continue to function, even in the face of having damage to the brain. You can imagine an athlete with an injury crossing the finish line, even though they’re injured.”

So why does being bilingual have any effect at all?

“The effect it has is, I believe, is on the attention system,” Bialystok says. “This is what cognition is, knowing what you need to attend to, and blocking out the rest.”

Brain changes

Bialystok believes the experience of using two languages effectively reorganizes your brain.

“So that means the more experience with bilingualism leads to greater changes. The longer you’re bilingual, the more the changes. The earlier you start

Read More