give

fitness

The Fitness and Wellness Industry’s Latest Advice: Give Yourself a Break

Life must be in a rough patch when even the fitness and weight-loss folks are telling people to take it easy.

With cocktail parties and celebratory dinners largely canceled by the pandemic, many purveyors of well-being aren’t issuing their usual holiday missives urging customers to resist second helpings, dodge the cookie tray or mind the nightcaps. Instead, weight-loss programs, fitness apps and lifestyle brands are emphasizing ways that users should be kinder and gentler to themselves.

“A lot of people aren’t celebrating Thanksgiving with the broad family they’re used to, so they’re looking for other moments of joy,” says Mindy Grossman, CEO of WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers. “Part of that is showing them what they can do for themselves.”

Last week, WW launched a new program called myWW+, which includes app tools that allow users to more closely track their mindset and sleep, in addition to their food intake and exercise. Earlier this year the company started a hydration tracker for users to record how many ounces of water they drink each day.

The idea behind these new wellness goals? Letting people find some type of success even when eating and exercise don’t go well. During the shutdown’s early months, 36% of Americans gained weight, with women putting on an average of 10.7 pounds and men 15 pounds, according to a WW survey of 1,004 U.S. adults in May.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

National Academy of Medicine president to give keynote address at 2020 CVBE Symposium – School of Engineering

The 2020 Progenitor Cell Translation Consortium (PCTC) Cardiovascular Bioengineering (CVBE) Symposium co-hosted by the UAB Department of Biomedical Engineering, will feature a keynote address by Victor Dzau, M.D., president of the National Academy of Medicine. Dzau, a professor of Medicine at Duke University will speak on “The Future of Heart Failure Therapy/Paracrine Mechanism of Stem Cell Therapy,” on December 5, 2020 at 9:10 a.m.

dzauSource: medicine.duke.eduDue to the worldwide outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19), the symposium will be held in a virtual format via Zoom for the first time. The event was originally scheduled for the spring in Göttingen, Germany, and was anticipated to draw speakers and guests from around the globe. This collaborative conference, focusing on cardiac gene and cell therapy topics, is co-hosted and co-organized by UAB BME Chair Jay Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., and Wolfram Zimmerman, Ph.D., of the University Medical Center Göttingen. Topics addressed will include areas of gene editing, induced pluripotent stem cells, cardiac stem cells in the context of heart failure, cardiovascular bioengineering, vascular tissue engineering, cardiac development, exosomes, microRNAs, and mitochondria.

In addition to his role of president of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) (formerly the Institute of Medicine), Dzau also serves as the vice chair of the National Research Council and is chancellor emeritus and James B. Duke Professor of Medicine at Duke University Health System. Prior to these roles, he was the Hersey Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Chairman of Medicine at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Chairman of the Department of Medicine and Director of the Falk Cardiovascular Research Center at Stanford University. Dzau is a prominent world health leader and advises governments, corporations, and universities worldwide. He has also made a major impact on health and medicine through his seminal research in cardiovascular medicine and genetics and his leadership in health innovation.

Registration is free, but will be required for access to the symposium. Register online at: https://translationalcells.org/content/pctc-cardiovascular-bioengineering-cvbe-symposium

Source Article

Read More
health

A brief, intense shutdown would give the U.S. a second chance against the virus

Nobody wants to return to the full-scale open-ended shutdowns of the early days of the pandemic. And yet muddling forward is not working. As a compromise, some European leaders have embraced the idea of “circuit breakers” — fairly intense closures lasting a limited time — that would interrupt viral spread and bring case counts down without the long-lasting social and economic pain of extended lockdowns. Britain’s Labour Party leader, Keir Starmer, has called for a circuit-breaker of two to three weeks, for example, to prevent a “sleepwalk into … a bleak winter.” Circuit breakers can be one-off interventions or regular occurrences (say, a three-week “reset” every two months).

The case for circuit breakers rests in part on the failures of our current approach. Phased reopenings aim to allow as much activity as possible, consistent with keeping cases at controlled levels through social distancing, masking and other restrictions. But they have a number of disadvantages in practice. First, they are hard to maintain over extended periods as compliance fatigue sets in, standards relax — and cases tick up. Furthermore, disparities in infection rates, both between and within states, make sacrifice inefficient. Many towns and subpopulations have already sacrificed more than enough to eliminate internal spread, but a constant threat of outside reinfection prevents them from relaxing and enjoying their triumph.

The underlying idea of the circuit breaker approach makes intuitive sense: After cutting oxygen off from a fire to reduce it to embers, for instance, restoring airflow intermittently doesn’t produce large flames. But add a steady continuous oxygen supply, even at a low level, and the blaze quickly rages out of control.

One study making use of epidemiological models — as yet, not peer-reviewed — found that a two-week circuit breaker would halve the number of deaths in the United Kingdom between now and the end of the year. And our own preliminary research suggests that if society wants to allow a certain amount of social and economic activity, doing so within select windows, followed by short-term shutdowns, will lead to fewer cases than allowing the same amount of activity to occur across unbroken stretches of time.

Using mathematical techniques, our work explored questions like this one: Suppose a town wishes to allow 1,000 small but risky activities like haircuts, ballgames, academic classes and small social gatherings over the course of a month. Is it better to put all the activities in one half of the month or space them out evenly? The mathematical answer is that concentrated sacrifice, followed by a period of relative openness, beats sacrifice that is spread out consistently over time. The size of the impact depends on many factors, but a typical analysis finds that 10 to 20 percent more activity might be possible (for the same amount of disease spread) when the activity is more concentrated.

Of course, not all activities can be shifted in time, so necessary events like urgent medical procedures would continue during a circuit-breaker shutdown. Additionally, when a month of activity

Read More
health

Don’t Give up on COVID-19 Plasma, Experts Say, After Study Finds No Benefit | Top News

LONDON (Reuters) – Researchers called on Friday for more research into using blood from recovered COVID-19 patients – or so-called convalescent plasma – as a potential treatment, after a small trial of hospitalised patients in India found it was of no benefit

The Indian results, published in the BMJ British Medical Journal, found that the plasma, which delivers antibodies from COVID-19 survivors to infected people, did not help hospitalised patients fight off the infection, and failed to reduce death rates or halt progression to severe disease.

The findings are a setback for a potential therapy that U.S. President Donald Trump touted in August as a “historic breakthrough”, and one experts say has been used in some 100,000 patients in the United States already, despite limited evidence on its efficacy.

Scientists not directly involved in the India study, which involved around 460 patients, said its results were disappointing but should not mean doctors give up hope altogether on convalescent plasma.

They said further and larger trials are needed, including in COVID-19 patients with milder disease and those newly infected.

“With just a few hundred patients, (the India trial) is still much too small to give clear results,” said Martin Landray, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Britain’s Oxford University.

“One could well imagine that the treatment might work particularly well in those earlier in the course of the disease or who have not been able to mount a good antibody response to the virus of their own,” he said. “But such speculation needs to be tested – we can’t just rely on an educated guess.”

While the United States and India have authorised convalescent plasma for emergency use, other countries, including Britain, are collecting donated plasma so that the treatment could be widely rolled out if it is shown to be effective.

The Indian researchers enrolled 464 adults with COVID-19 who were admitted to hospitals across India between April and July. They were randomly split into two groups – with one receiving two transfusions of convalescent plasma alongside best standard care, and the other getting best standard care only.

After seven days, use of convalescent plasma seemed to improve some symptoms, such as shortness of breath and fatigue, and led to higher rates of so-called negative conversion – a sign that the virus is being neutralised by antibodies.

But this did not translate into a reduction in deaths or progression to severe disease by 28 days.

Ian Jones, a Reading University professor of virology, agreed with Landray that plasma may be more likely to work very soon after someone contracts COVID-19.

He urged these and other researchers to continue to conduct trials, and to do so in newly diagnosed patients.

“We still do not have enough treatments for the early stage of disease to prevent severe disease and until this becomes an option, avoiding being infected with the virus remains the key message,” he said.

(Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Peter Graff and Frances Kerry)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters

Read More
health

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines

Syringe on gauze pad with vaccine bottles
Syringe on gauze pad with vaccine bottles

Credit – Getty Images—Jonnie Miles

On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines.

The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially infected with the virus naturally declines as well, and it takes researchers longer to accumulate enough data to tell if a vaccine is effective or not. By intentionally exposing people to the virus after they have been vaccinated, researchers can shrink this timeline significantly.

Scientists have used the model to test vaccines against a number of different diseases, including the very first one against smallpox—Edward Jenner infected his son with cowpox, and then exposed his son to smallpox as a way to test his theory that exposure to the former would protect his son from infection by the latter. Scientists tested an H1N1 influenza vaccine by exposing people to the flu, and did the same with a cholera vaccine and the bacterium that causes it. But the strategy requires a solid base of information about both the disease and the vaccine in order to justify the risks. More recently, for example, scientists considered intentionally infecting volunteers with the Zika virus to test vaccines against that disease, but ultimately decided they didn’t have enough data to justify the risk.

Adair Richards, honorary associate professor at the University of Warwick who last May published guidelines on how to ethically conduct human challenge studies, notes that during a pandemic, the risk of delays in developing treatments should be considered alongside the risks to volunteers who are intentionally exposed to disease. “There is a moral weight to inaction as well as action,” he says. “There is an unseen risk if we don’t do [these studies]. We send a lot of doctors, nurses and care workers to work every day, and some will get really sick and die of COVID-19 in the next few weeks. [Those] few weeks count—that’s the unseen risk.”

More than 38,000 people in the U.S. agree, and have registered their intention to volunteer for challenge studies on 1DaySooner.org, an online recruiting group—despite the fact that no such studies have been planned in the country yet.

The London-based scientists still need to submit a detailed proposal to regulatory agencies on how they could conduct their study. If the proposal is approved, the team won’t start exposing any volunteers until January. Before that, they will first need to determine what dose of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is safe to give to people but can still produce

Read More
health

Man In Coma For 8 Years Wakes Up Minutes After Doctors Give Him Sleeping Pill

A man, who was in a coma for nearly a decade, regained full consciousness and started to walk, minutes after a doctor gave him a sleeping pill.

The man, identified as 37-year-old Richard, was hospitalized in his late 20s after he choked on a piece of meat which left him with severe brain damage. He suffered from akinetic mutism, a condition in which a person cannot move or speak.

After eight years, the doctors discovered that certain types of brain damage could be temporarily cured by sleeping pills. With his family’s permission, the pill, Zolpidem, was administered and within 20 minutes of taking it, the man woke up and also asked the nurse how he can operate the wheelchair.

“Because Richard’s situation seemed hopeless, the family and I decided to administer this medication to Richard. Against all expectations, Zolpidem had remarkable effects. After taking the sleeping pill, Richard started talking, wanted to call his father, and started recognizing his brothers again. With some help, he could even get up from his wheelchair and walk short distances,” Doctoral student Willemijn van Erp at Radboud University told medical journal Cortex. 

Speaking about the decision to give him the sleeping pill, Dr. Hisse Arnts at Amsterdam UMC said, “Richard’s brain scans show overactivity in certain parts of the brain. This overactivity causes noise and somehow shuts down the “good” brain activity. We have discovered that administering this sleeping medication can suppress this unwanted brain overactivity, creating space for speech and movement.”

The medication’s effect, however, started wearing off after it was administered once a day for five days.

“The time windows during which the patient was able to talk and move got narrower, and his abilities to move and speak during these time windows decreased. The use of multiple doses of zolpidem during a single day showed no improvement in his clinical condition and sometimes even caused sedation,” Dr. Arnts told the journal. 

CT scan This a representational image showing doctors looking at CT scan in Bethesda, Maryland, Feb. 8, 2018. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Make, give, eat: Why dumplings are the medicine we need during a pandemic – Food and Dining – Austin American-Statesman

Every culture has a dumpling, and I want them all.

Pot stickers and pierogi, pasties and samosas, empanadas and ravioli. These are just a few of the hand pies and filled dumplings that people around the world reach for at family get-togethers, annual celebrations and weekday lunches.

The dumplings I knew as a kid weren’t really dumplings. Those thick, hand-cut noodles dropped into chicken stew dumplings are still a nostalgic comfort food, but those aren’t the dumplings that currently fill my freezer.

I’ve always tried to keep a little stash of Asian, Italian, Argentinean and Eastern European dumplings for quick dinners, but this year, that stash has grown into a stockpile. It must have something to do with the anxieties and uncertainties of the pandemic — plus all this time at home to cook — that have led to a larger-than-usual supply of dumplings that I can cook for a quick lunch or dinner.

In the past few weeks, I’ve been focused on making hundreds of Asian dumplings to give away to neighbors and friends, some of whom have welcomed babies during this year of the coronavirus. Reactions are almost identical each time I hand someone a bag, usually filled with some kind of frozen pork-and-scallion stuffed pot stickers: raised eyebrows, open mouth and some exclamation along the lines of “Oh, I love dumplings!”

During the past six months, I’ve written about making empanadas, pierogi and ravioli, but it wasn’t until this month’s one-person pot sticker parties that I started to wonder why I’ve been so drawn to dumplings this year.

So I reached out to C.K. Chin, the community-building restaurateur behind Wu Chow and Swift’s Attic. His downtown Chinese restaurant is now selling frozen dumplings by the dozens, and I knew Chin would help me sort out what it is about these little pockets of joy that makes them so magical.

Unlike lasagna, brisket or a big pot of soup, which are also definitely comfort foods, dumplings aren’t necessarily meant to feed a crowd — although they certainly can. Dumplings usually start the other way, with a group of people gathered around a table, with everyone putting their labor together to make something that can be divided and shared among them.

Once you’ve made all those dumplings — no matter what kind — you can store them in a freezer to feed your future self. Dumplings embody a certain kind of optimism, Chin says.

“In Asian cultures, dumplings carry deep symbolism. They are treated with a lot of reverence and good luck because they are shaped like gold ingots. Even if you don’t believe the mythos of it, it becomes a tradition in your house,” he says.

With humble origins, dumplings don’t need much to shine. In Asian cultures, the dough is usually made with flour, water and salt, and in the right hands, those ingredients can transform into an almost transparent skin that maintains a slightly chewy texture when boiled or fried. “It takes out-of-the-box thinking to make

Read More
fitness

Give your brain the ultimate workout with this science-backed cognitive-fitness app

 

The Hill may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

Brain training exercises are hardly new—you’ve likely been finding ways to bolster your cognitive skills your whole life without realizing it, whether through crossword puzzles, Sudoku, or card games. What is relatively new, however, is having the ability to play scientifically-backed brain training games directly on your cellphone.

Among some of the most popular digital brain training solutions is CogniFit, an app that provides engaging content users can access on their iPhones, tablets, Android devices, or computers. CogniFit is recognized as a global leader in the Cognitive Assessment and Training Market, boasting games, puzzles, assessments, and teasers that are backed by scientific patented technology. The goal of these short, personalized activities is to improve several cognitive functions, including perception, concentration, memory, and hand-eye coordination, as well as improve your brain plasticity. 

More than that, the app will measure, train, and monitor your cognitive skills with each of these programs. And along the way, users will receive real-time feedback that will help them track their performance and compare these results to a cohort of their peers. 

Currently, CogniFit has a solid 4.4-star rating on both the App Store and Google Play Store from thousands of users. As one current subscriber notes, CogniFit offers a variety of “Fun games to keep you spry in the mind! It really does challenge you to focus…” 

If you are looking to upgrade your current brain exercises from the Sunday crossword puzzle to a personalized brain teaser designed for your age group and skillsets, maybe it is time you try out CogniFit, too. Currently, a one-year subscription is 58% off, making it just $49.99. 

Prices subject to change.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

Rampant Napoli give Atalanta dose of their own medicine

NAPLES, Italy (Reuters) – Napoli blasted four goals in a devastating 20-minute first half spell as they thumped Atalanta 4-1 in Serie A on Saturday, handing the visitors a taste of their own medicine.



Serie A - Napoli v Atalanta


© Reuters/ALBERTO LINGRIA
Serie A – Napoli v Atalanta

Free-scoring Atalanta, last season’s top-scorers with 98 goals, had netted 13 goals in winning their first three games but had no answer to Napoli’s attacks in an extraordinary first half.

Loading...

Load Error

Mexican forward Hirving Lozano, out of favour with coach Gennaro Gattuso last season, set Napoli on their way with two goals in four minutes.

The player known as “Chucky” tapped in from Giovanni Di Lorenzo’s cross in the 23rd minute and curled in the second after Dries Mertens pounced on a mix-up in the Atalanta midfield.

Matteo Politano fired the third on the half hour and Nigeria forward Victor Osimhen took advantage of more poor defending to score the fourth before the interval.

Napoli goalkeeper David Ospina’s kick upfield was misjudged by Cristian Romero and Osimhen, signed from Lille in the summer, chested the ball down and scored with a shot on the turn to net his first goal for his new club.

Romero partially made amends by setting up Atalanta’s consolation for substitute Sam Lammers in the 69th minute. The Argentine won possession, charged upfield and released Lammers who clipped his shot past Ospina.

Atalanta remained on nine points from four games, one ahead of Napoli.

Napoli have won all three of their games on the pitch, scoring 12 goals and conceding one.

However, Serie A’s disciplinary committee handed them a 3-0 defeat for failing to play a match against Juventus amid confusion over the COVID-19 rules and they also had a point deducted.

(Reporting by Brian Homewood, editing by Ed Osmond)

Source Article

Read More