game

medicine

Ex-lacrosse star Delby Powless writes about mental health in novel ‘Medicine Game’

Writing a novel is one of the hardest — but most cathartic — things former pro lacrosse player Delby Powless has ever done.

“Medicine Game” centres on Tommy Henry as he struggles with violent outbursts and addiction on the fictional Sparrow Lake Nation. Powless said that he wrote the novel as a way to open up about his own mental health struggles and pay tribute to friends he’s lost.

“This was by the most therapeutic thing I’ve ever done,” said Powless. “It was really emotional to write about this stuff, not just because of my own things but because I was thinking about people that have passed, that aren’t with us anymore.”

Powless, who won the Tom Longboat Award as Canada’s top Indigenous athlete in 2003, spent his entire six-year career in the National Lacrosse League with the Buffalo Bandits. He played all levels of his junior and senior lacrosse for teams in Six Nations of the Grand River, Ont., and represented the Iroquois Nationals in international competition.

Even with his success as a lacrosse player, Powless said he struggled with his mental health and opening up to friends and teammates.

That began to change when Powless read “Playing With Fire,” a memoir by former NHLer Theo Fleury. Powless said Fleury’s memoir made him realize he was not alone and that opening up could help him and his readers.

“This was my way of coming out to let people know what I’ve gone through mental-health wise,” the 40-year-old Powless said. “I had kept stuff inside of me for 30, 35 years.”

In the short time “Medicine Game” has been out, Powless said he’s received a lot of positive feedback, especially from other Indigenous men, who have told him it’s encouraged them to be more open.

“They bought it because they thought it was about lacrosse and they start reading it and they start realizing how it’s about the rez and the mental health stuff and the history of residential schools and other things they could relate to,” said Powless.

Lacrosse was played by the Haudenosaunee — known in French as the Iroquois and in English as the Six Nations — thousands of years before Europeans arrived in North America. Sometimes called the Creator’s Game or the Medicine Game, many First Nations people believe that playing lacrosse can heal them spiritually and physically.

Powless, who is now a child and youth counselor in the Six Nations community, said that the camaraderie he — and his protagonist — feels when playing lacrosse is an experience he wanted to convey to his readers.

“When I was going through a really rough time, one of my coaches texted me that he hoped to see me back at the rink because lacrosse is good medicine,” said Powless. “That stuck with me, just to think of it that way.

“Just to get out there and be around the boys is helpful to people and their well-being.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov.

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medicine

Ex-lacrosse star Delby Powless writes about mental health in novel ‘Medicine Game’

Writing a novel is one of the hardest — but most cathartic — things former pro lacrosse player Delby Powless has ever done.

“Medicine Game” centres on Tommy Henry as he struggles with violent outbursts and addiction on the fictional Sparrow Lake Nation. Powless said that he wrote the novel as a way to open up about his own mental health struggles and pay tribute to friends he’s lost.

“This was by the most therapeutic thing I’ve ever done,” said Powless. “It was really emotional to write about this stuff, not just because of my own things but because I was thinking about people that have passed, that aren’t with us anymore.”

Powless, who won the Tom Longboat Award as Canada’s top Indigenous athlete in 2003, spent his entire six-year career in the National Lacrosse League with the Buffalo Bandits. He played all levels of his junior and senior lacrosse for teams in Six Nations of the Grand River, Ont., and represented the Iroquois Nationals in international competition.

Even with his success as a lacrosse player, Powless said he struggled with his mental health and opening up to friends and teammates.

That began to change when Powless read “Playing With Fire,” a memoir by former NHLer Theo Fleury. Powless said Fleury’s memoir made him realize he was not alone and that opening up could help him and his readers.

“This was my way of coming out to let people know what I’ve gone through mental-health wise,” the 40-year-old Powless said. “I had kept stuff inside of me for 30, 35 years.”

In the short time “Medicine Game” has been out, Powless said he’s received a lot of positive feedback, especially from other Indigenous men, who have told him it’s encouraged them to be more open.

“They bought it because they thought it was about lacrosse and they start reading it and they start realizing how it’s about the rez and the mental health stuff and the history of residential schools and other things they could relate to,” said Powless.

Lacrosse was played by the Haudenosaunee — known in French as the Iroquois and in English as the Six Nations — thousands of years before Europeans arrived in North America. Sometimes called the Creator’s Game or the Medicine Game, many First Nations people believe that playing lacrosse can heal them spiritually and physically.

Powless, who is now a child and youth counselor in the Six Nations community, said that the camaraderie he — and his protagonist — feels when playing lacrosse is an experience he wanted to convey to his readers.

“When I was going through a really rough time, one of my coaches texted me that he hoped to see me back at the rink because lacrosse is good medicine,” said Powless. “That stuck with me, just to think of it that way.

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“Just to get out there and be around the boys is helpful to people and their well-being.”

This report by The

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fitness

Bollywood Actors In Their 60s Who Are Acing The Fitness Game Like No Other

We are blessed with actors in the Indian film industry who don’t look a day older than 40 but are actually in their 60s. Such fitness levels at their age is nothing but phenomenal. 

Anyone who ever dreads ageing can learn a lesson or two from these veteran actors, who are living proof that age is nothing but just a number, and that you’re never too old to start working out and take care of your physical health, and mind you, also your mental health. 

From Anil Kapoor, Anupam Kher to Jackie Shroff, all these actors have crossed the age of 60 but are acing the fitness game like no other. Also, when it comes to physical fitness, these actors can easily give people half their age a run for their money and metabolism. Don’t believe us? 

Check out some of the inspiring videos and pics of these actors: 

1. Anil Kapoor 

Of late, Anil Kapoor is making people half his age extremely envious about him on social media. Why, you ask? It’s because he has become an unstoppable force both in terms of acting and fitness. 

“This papa doesn’t preach, just removes his top and walks to the beach,” that’s what he wrote in one of his posts where he’s walking shirtless at the beach. 

At 63, Anil Kapoor looks as good and young as he did during his debut days and the credit entirely goes to his dedication towards fitness and health. 

From running, cycling, doing planks, jumping ropes to weight lifting, the actor is at the top of his fitness game and is giving major fitness goals to his fans and followers in the process.  

2. Rajinikanth 

At 69, Rajinikanth is at his fittest best and gave proof of the same while shooting Into The Wild With Bear Grylls. Remember? The duo went on an adventurous journey through the Bandipur Tiger Reserve in Karnataka. 

Earlier this year, his fans flooded social media with pictures of him working out during the shoot of his movie Darbar. In the pictures, the actor was seen flaunting his ripped biceps and toned physique. 

Apart from working out, the actor also practices yoga and swims frequently. Many of his fans might not be aware that he frequents Mt Kailash every year. 

3. Sunny Deol 

The actor-turned-politician celebrated his 64th birthday on October 19, 2020. His father Dharmendra shared pictures from his birthday party, on social media, where Sunny Deol did not look a day older than 40! 

The actor, who is best known for his “dhai kilo ka haath” dialogue told Filmfare, “Fitness is an addiction for me. If I don’t work out, I don’t feel energetic throughout the day. I work out with weights in the morning and play sports in the afternoon.” 

Well, if this doesn’t motivate you, what will?  

4. Amitabh Bachchan

At 78, Amitabh Bachchan is the oldest actor on this list, but his fitness levels are undoubtedly at par with people half

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fitness

France still sweating over Mbappe’s fitness for Portugal game [Video]

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: CONTAINS WHITE FLASHES

SHOWS:

LISBON, PORTUGAL (NOVEMBER 13, 2020) (REUTERS – ACCESS ALL)

1. FRANCE COACH, DIDIER DESCHAMPS, WALKING ONTO PITCH WEARING A MASK

2. SQUAD WALKING ONTO PITCH FOR TEAM MEETING

3. FRANCE STRIKER, KYLIAN MBAPPE, STANDING ON PITCH WEARING A MASK FOR MEETING

4. DESCHAMPS AND COACHING STAFF

5. SQUAD HUDDLED ON PITCH IN MOMENT OF SILENCE

6. SQUAD BREAKING UP HUDDLE TO START TRAINING SESSION

7. TRAINER PUTTING BRACELET ON MBAPPE

8. SQUAD WARMING UP ON PITCH

9. FRANCE FORWARD, ANTOINE GRIEZMANN, WARMING UP

10. FRANCE MIDFIELDER, PAUL POGBA, DURING WARM UP

11. SQUAD WARMING UP ON PITCH

12. VARIOUS OF MBAPPE JOGGING ON PITCH APART FROM THE REST OF THE SQUAD (3 SHOTS)

13. GRIEZMANN WARMING UP

14. SQUAD WARMING UP AND PASSING BALLS

15. DESCHAMPS LOOKING AT PIECE OF PAPER

16. POGBA RUNNING

17. GOALKEEPERS TRAINING

18. VARIOUS OF SQUAD STRETCHING

19. MBAPPE RUNNING HIGH-KNEES APART FROM THE REST OF THE SQUAD

20. SQUAD STRETCHING IN MIDDLE OF PITCH IN EMPTY STADIUM

LISBON, PORTUGAL (NOVEMBER 13, 2020) (RTP – ACCESS ALL)

21. FRANCE COACH, DIDIER DESCHAMPS, WALKING INTO NEWS CONFERENCE

22. WHITE FLASH

23. (SOUNDBITE) (French) FRANCE COACH, DIDIER DESCHAMPS, ON MBAPPE, SAYING:

“He (Mbappe) will do the first part of the training session on his own, because he’s got specific work to do and we will see what happens. With him, like with other players, I will obviously wait to see how the training session goes today and we will look at the situation tomorrow morning to see how everyone is before making these decisions for tomorrow’s match.”

24. WHITE FLASH

25. (SOUNDBITE) (French) FRANCE COACH, DIDIER DESCHAMPS, ON FACING PORTUGAL, SAYING:

“Portugal is going to do everything to win the match, and so are we. It’s tough to predict what is going to happen. It is probably going to be similar to other matches we’ve had with two very solid, very strategic squads. We can start with intentions to control the ball, but that doesn’t guarantee success. But the intentions, both for Portugal and for us, will be there. We’ve not come here to suffer, but it is possible that at times we will. But every team, Portugal or any other squad among the best in Europe and in the world will try to have the ball and create problems for their opponents, but when you don’t have the ball, it’s also about being effective in defence. Both teams were very good in the match in October. So, we will see tomorrow.”

STORY: France striker Kylian Mbappe faces a late fitness test ahead of their Nations League A Group 3 clash away to Portugal, coach Didier Deschamps said on Friday (November 13).

The Paris St Germain forward missed Les Bleus’s 2-0 home defeat by Finland with a thigh injury that made his presence for the Portugal trip on Saturday uncertain.

“He’s going to do the first part of the training session tonight on his own and for him,

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medicine

New Game Changers In Medicine Episode About The Discovery Of Insulin Premieres On World Diabetes Day, November 14

NEW YORK, Nov. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Game Changers in Medicine, the new monthly podcast from Dramatic Health, premieres its fifth  episode Insulin: The lucky coin toss and improbable partnership that led to this life-saving elixir on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2020. Insulin was discovered almost 100 years ago and has been saving the lives of patients with diabetes ever since. Currently, more than 460 million people worldwide suffer from some form of diabetes. Produced by Dramatic Health co-founder and CEO Sean T. Moloney, the series is hosted by renowned medical futurist Dr. Rubin Pillay of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

For details on the podcast series, visit www.gamechangersinmedicine.com 

The Dramatic Health and Game Changers in Medicine teams have gathered a distinguished group of experts to discuss the science and serendipity behind the discovery of insulin, and to offer their perspectives on the ongoing search for a cure for diabetes. Participants in Insulin: The lucky coin toss and improbable partnership that led to this life-saving elixir include:  Jay S. Skyler, MD, MACP is currently a Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics, & Psychology, in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. He served as Director of that division from 2000 to 2004. He is Deputy Director of Clinical Research and Academic Programs at the Diabetes Research Institute. Grant Maltman, curator of the Banting House National Historic Site of Canada, in London, Ontario, coordinates cultural resource management and heritage presentation at Banting House–the birthplace of insulin. Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, CDE is a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) and certified diabetes educator (CDE) who has successfully managed her own Type 1 diabetes for more than 45 years.

According to Executive Producer Sean Moloney, “We have an abundance of material, including an interview with Dr. H. Franklin Bunn, the hematologist at Harvard Medical School, who co-discovered the hemoglobin A1c, a major diagnostic indicator of prediabetes and diabetes.  Dr. Bunn appeared in the premiere episode of Game Changers in Medicine last July.” A bonus episode of “Insulin: The lucky coin toss and improbable partnership that led to this life-saving elixir will be released at the end of November. 

Dramatic Health, a national healthcare video company, is the producer of the six-part podcast series Game Changers in Medicine. Previous episodes have included: the premiere podcast about Vitamin K and an enterprising Boston house doctor; the creation of a smallpox vaccine and its parallels to today’s urgent search for a COVID-19 vaccine; the history of the blood thinner warfarin, a rat poison turned game-changer in cardiology, and the development of the X-ray.  All episodes, a series backgrounder, and additional material about the podcast series are available at  www.gamechangersinmedicine.com and can be accessed wherever you find your podcasts.

-30-

Contact: Mark G. Auerbach. [email protected]

For additional details on the episode participants:
Diabetes Research Institute Foundation.

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fitness

Alex Morgan: Tottenham star says she needs WSL game time to regain match fitness

World Cup winner Alex Morgan said regaining match fitness will take time after making her much-awaited debut for Tottenham in Saturday’s 1-1 Women’s Super League draw with Reading.

The United States forward came on with 20 minutes left but could not inspire Spurs to a first WSL win of the season.

Morgan joined in September, but has had to wait to return to action, having only given birth to a daughter in May.

“It feels good to be back for the first time in more than a year,” she said.

The 31-year-old told the Tottenham website:external-link “I am hoping to get much more time next match and the remaining matches to keep building.

“My fitness is getting back there. It will just take a little bit of time. I have to get minutes to get game fit.

“I felt like there was definitely a lot more sprints than in training. I will get used to it pretty quickly, but it was more of a transition game.

“I am looking forward to getting in to more of the game to settle in a little bit better.”

Tottenham remain in ninth place after two draws and four defeats so far. On Saturday, they went behind to a 13th-minute Brooke Chaplen goal but Ashleigh Neville equalised before half-time with a header from a corner.

“Going down 1-0 was disappointing, but getting the goal back from a set-piece was important,” added Morgan, who is a two-time World Cup winner and was part of the USA squad that took gold at the 2012 Olympics in London.

“I don’t think we had enough chances to put ourselves ahead but we will work on that.

“Obviously I am not too happy about the result, but I had to start to get some minutes and build from there so I am pretty happy this is a good starting point.”

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fitness

Honor Band 6 to shake up fitness tracker game on 3 November

Huawei spin-off Honor is set to announce the Honor Band 6 as the latest instalment of its budget fitness tracker range.

The company teased an announcement on Chinese social media site Weibo, claiming its arrival would mark a new era for full-screen wearables.

What that seems to indicate is that we are going to get a bigger screen on its next tracker and it could maybe be planning to switch up the display technology too.

Essential reading: Best fitness trackers to buy right now

The Honor Band 5, which was announced in July last year, featured a 0.95-inch AMOLED touchscreen display with a 240 x 120 resolution.

So we imagine that screen size and resolution will get a sizeable bump up on the Band 6.

Honor Band 6

We know that the likes of Xiaomi and Amazfit have significantly upped their game in the screen department for their budget trackers and Honor may be looking to follow suit by offering something more high grade this time around.

Aside from pointing to some screen improvements, there’s no mention of the kind of fitness tracking features it’ll be packing. The Band 5 offered activity tracking, exercise monitoring, a heart rate monitor support, notifications and introduced an SpO2 monitor.

The Band 5 is currently priced $36.99 putting it firmly in the same budget tracker bracket as the Xiaomi Mi Band 5. The question will be whether Honor will manage to keep that price down with the teased changes they’re set to make.

In terms of a launch, it’s likely that it’s one that will be made available in China first as has been the case previously. It did though eventually make it out into other territories soon after.

We were fans of the Band 5, praising its display and for offering good value for money. We only have a few days to find out what the Honor Band 6 will be capable of and how much it’ll cost to own one.

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fitness

West Ham sweating on star man Antonio’s fitness after he went off for the second game in a row

West Ham sweating on the fitness of star man Michail Antonio after he was forced off for the second game in a row… with forward waiting for a scan on niggling hamstring problem

  • Michail Antonio was taken off after 52 minutes after scoring against West Ham
  • Only Harry Kane has scored more than the 30-year-old since Project Restart 
  • Antonio has suffered a series of hamstring problems since joining the Hammers

West Ham are waiting anxiously to hear whether leading goalscorer Michail Antonio will need treatment for a recurring hamstring problem after the 30-year-old came off during Saturday’s 1-1 draw with Manchester City. 

Antonio had put the Hammers in front in the match with a brilliant bicycle kick after 18 minutes to bag his 11th Premier League goal since matches went behind closed doors due to the Covid-19 pandemic, with only Tottenham striker Harry Kane scoring more in that time in England’s top flight.

However, he was withdrawn seven minutes into the second half, with Andriy Yarmolenko coming on to replace him just after Phil Foden had equalised for City, and now there are concerns he could face an extended spell out. 

Michail Antonio scored a spectacular bicycle kick before being substituted in the second half

Michail Antonio scored a spectacular bicycle kick before being substituted in the second half

The initial assessment of Antonio’s injury was inconclusive and he will have a scan by Thursday at the latest. 

The London-born forward has become the focal point of the Hammers’ attack with his tireless running, intelligent link-up play and deadly finishing and will be sorely missed if he does have to spend time on the sidelines.

David Moyes’ side have a weekend trip to Liverpool up next as they look to haul themselves back into the top half of the table. 

Antonio had been substituted the previous weekend during the epic 3-3 comeback against Tottenham with a similar issue and West Ham manager Moyes was optimistic he would recover quickly when speaking after the Man City match. 

Antonio has been in sizzling form since matches went behind closed doors due to Covid-19

Antonio has been in sizzling form since matches went behind closed doors due to Covid-19

The former Sheffield Wednesday man has suffered a succession of hamstring problems since joining the east Londoners, but he is enjoying a new lease of life under Moyes. 

With £45million Sebastien Haller unfancied by Moyes in the league, Antonio has found himself at the point of the attack and has thrived, scoring in the 3-0 win over Leicester City this season, as well as popping up with crucial strikes against Chelsea and Manchester United last term and firing four past Norwich City to relegate the Canaries in July. 

Moyes will be hoping other members of the side’s attack can fill the void if Antonio does face time out and the ex-Everton boss will be encouraged by the form of his side, who have taken five points from matches against Leicester, Tottenham and City this month. 

Jarrod Bowen has chipped in with three goals in six

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health

New rapid tests a ‘game changer’ against COVID

GENEVA (AP) — Health officials in Africa say the rollout of rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 could be a “game changer” for their fight against the coronavirus but also warned Thursday that increased testing could drive up confirmed cases on a continent that has seen them decline or plateauing as case numbers soar in the West.

Some experts worry that Africa so far has lacked the ability to test widely enough, especially in hard-to-reach rural areas, and that its case counts therefore don’t reflect reality and impede tracking the virus.

“African countries are gearing up to introduce antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests on a large scale, and this will be a game changer, we think, in the fight against COVID-19,” Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization’s regional director for Africa, said. “These high-quality rapid tests will help meet the huge unmet need for testing in Africa.”

Speaking from Brazzaville, Congo, at an online news conference, Moeti noted that WHO Africa region comprising sub-Saharan Africa plus Algeria – has seen a downward trend from a daily average of more than 15,000 cases in July to less than 4,000 in the past month -– prompting some governments to pull back from their toughest containment measures.

“As countries ease restrictions on movement, some increase in cases is expected, but preventing an exponential rise is absolutely critical,” she said.


From early on in the pandemic, officials at WHO headquarters in Geneva, including the U.N. health agency’s Ethiopian director-general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, have expressed concerns that COVID-19 could have a big impact on weaker health systems like those in Africa.

However, developed countries with world-class health systems so far have been among the ones hardest hit by virus outbreaks. WHO’s 54-nation European region tallied 927,000 cases in its latest weekly count, a new record high.

Dr. Susan Ndidde Nabadda, head of the Ugandan National Health Laboratory Services and Central Public Health Laboratory, suggested that it could take some time to ensure proper authorizations and a high-quality process before rapid diagnostic tests on a broader scale because “there is no longer really a lot of emergency” in Africa.

Nabadda cited reports indicating that the identification of COVID-19 cases increased in Guinea once the west African country started rolling out the RDTs, noting that “we might see more numbers coming on board” as the tests are deployed more widely.

She said the relative lack of testing in Africa could be one of the reasons why African case counts were lower than in developed countries.

WHO announced last month that it and leading partners have agreed on a plan to roll out 120 million rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 to help lower- and middle-income countries make up ground in a testing gap with richer countries.

The antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests for which WHO issued an emergency use listing are intended to provide better testing access to areas where it is harder to distribute the PCR tests often in many wealthier nations.

The rapid tests look for antigens, or

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