gains

medicine

Regenerative Medicine Market Size, Share to Amass Significant Gains During 2020-2025 – Industry News

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Dec 01, 2020 (Market Insight Reports) —
Selbyville, Delaware. The report Regenerative Medicine Market Size and Analysis maintains enhanced dynamics and is overshadowed by a top player across the globe. The research report provides Regenerative Medicine Market Growth and information corresponding to market segments such as geographies, product type, application, and end-use industry. Experts use the most recent Regenerative Medicine Market research techniques and tools to assemble widespread and precise marketing research reports. A detailed outline about Regenerative Medicine market size and share were combined in this report which gives a comprehensive analysis of different verticals of businesses.

The prevalence of diseases Alzheimera??s, diabetes and other chronic disorders is higher among the aging population across the globe. The incidence of diseases is getting increased day by day among the population. According to the Alzheimera??s Association, it is the 6th leading cause in the United States in 2020 and around 5 million individuals are living with Alzheimera??s. The use of regenerative medicine is getting popular and offers a complete cure from the disease. According to research report a??Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020a??, the Global Regenerative Medicine market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of around 21.5% during 2020-25.

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Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020 research report depicts a deep dive market analysis of statistics of Global Regenerative Medicine market which consists of regional and country-wise market size, forecast, CAGR market segmentation, market shares of diverse regions and countries, market share of various end-users, applications, product type, technologies, competitive benchmarking, etc.

Pharmaceutical Remains a Dominant Sector

The pharmaceutical sector witnessed immense growth opportunities as more and more companies are indulging in research and studies for regenerative medicine in 2019. Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated in 2018 got approval by FDA for launching their third medicine SYMDEKO for cystic fibrosis (CF) which is a genetic disorder affects liver, kidneys, pancreas, intestine, and lungs. These developments are propelling the growth of regenerative medicine and are expected to witness bolstering demand through 2025 as revealed by the research report a??Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis, 2020a??.

Musculoskeletal Disorders is Gaining Pace Across the Globe

The rising occurrence of arthritis and orthopedic diseases among the aging population as well as in the young population. Therefore, musculoskeletal disorders grabbed the largest market share in 2019. Moreover, diseases such as diabetes are also common in the Asian subcontinent. Moreover, around 34.2 million people of all ages or 10.5% of the US population had diabetes in 2018. Approximately, 34.1 million adults aged 18 years or older or 13.0% of all US adults had diabetes, according to US National Diabetes Statistics.

According to the key players with a considerable market share in the Global Regenerative Medicine market include Novartis AG, Vericel, Stryker, Spark Therapeutics, Wright Medical, Pfizer, Abbott, Astra Zenca Ltd., Astellas Pharma Inc., Osiris Therapeutics, Mimedx Group, Organogenesis Inc., Athersys, Inc, Acelity Holdings, Inc, etc.

Key Questions

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fitness

Dick’s Sporting Goods Gains on Outdoor Lifestyle and Home Fitness Trends

The same trends of outdoor living and home fitness that are elevating recreational vehicle retailer Camping World Holdings and home-gym equipment maker Peloton Interactive are unsurprisingly also benefiting Dick’s Sporting Goods (NYSE: DKS).

The sporting goods retailer reported third-quarter results Tuesday that came in like a high, hard fastball and blew past analyst expectations.

Golf Galaxy store

Image source: Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Hitting it out of the park

Dick’s reported revenue jumped 23% to $2.3 billion while adjusted profits nearly quadrupled to $2.01 per share, well ahead of Wall Street’s consensus estimates of $2.2 billion and $1.08 per share.

Driving the gains were the positive positioning it has “across golf, outdoor activities, home fitness, and active lifestyle,” said chairman and CEO Ed Stark.

President Lauren Hobart, who was also just appointed to succeed Stark as CEO, said the retailer’s online sales doubled during the quarter, and it was able to use its stores as fulfillment centers for 70% of those sales. Comparable sales at its brick-and-mortar stores also rose by double-digit percentages.

The insistence on social distancing during the pandemic has led consumers to pursue activities that involve fewer people or greater distances. That’s why the RV lifestyle leader Camping World was able to crush analyst expectations this quarter as people took to the road, as did Peloton, which saw sales triple. It’s also why Callaway Golf was able to post record sales and earnings.

Because it was on trend, and because Dick’s Sporting Goods has a broad cross section of categories under its roof, investors probably should have had an inkling sales and profits would be rising at the retailer as well.

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health

Attacks on Obamacare threaten coverage gains among minorities

Threats to Obamacare could deal a new blow to communities of color that have been disproportionately ravaged by the coronavirus pandemic as the nation is reckoning with generations of inequity.

The Affordable Care Act’s insurance subsidies, its expansions of Medicaid eligibility and its protections for preexisting conditions have especially helped Americans of color, narrowing historic disparities in access to health insurance and affordable care. The coverage gains are among the most significant since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid and the desegregation of American hospitals more than 50 years ago.

Now, President Donald Trump is again threatening to replace the law if he’s reelected. And exactly one week after the election, the Supreme Court, with its new 6-3 conservative majority, will hear oral arguments in a case brought by conservative states seeking to overturn the entire Affordable Care Act. If the law is dismantled, the communities it aided the most stand to lose the most.

“Health care could be ripped away from millions and the numbers of uninsured Americans of color could skyrocket—aggravating the health care disparities that already exist in this country,” said Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.). “It’s especially infuriating that this is happening in the middle of a deadly pandemic that is disproportionately devastating so many seniors, Black, Brown and Native Americans and those with pre-existing conditions.”

Between 2013, the year before the Obamacare markets opened and Medicaid expansion began, and 2018, the rate of Latinx adults without health insurance plummeted from 40 percent to 25. The uninsured rate for Black adults fell from 24 percent to 14. For white adults, it dropped from 15 percent to 9, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

“There is no doubt that the Affordable Care Act, though it left millions uninsured, narrowed the racial gap in health insurance coverage and that’s a good thing,” said Mary Bassett, the former New York City health commissioner who is now a professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “Having millions suddenly lose their health insurance seems very likely to have an adverse impact.”

If the health law disappeared, the Urban Institute estimated that the gaps would widen once again, almost back to 2013 levels. And that assessment was in 2019 — before the devastation wrought by the coronavirus which is exacerbating inequality, in both health and the economy overall.

Especially affected would be people of color living in one of the 38 states that expanded Medicaid, the joint federal-state health program for low-income people. Without health coverage, many would lose access to much-needed care for chronic health conditions — and become more vulnerable to serious complications from Covid-19.

Trump says he wants a health system that will give people more choice, at less cost. “It’s in court, because Obamacare is no good,” he said at his second and last debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

Even the Affordable Care Act’s backers admit it was not a panacea. Health inequities, some driven by generations of systemic racism, persist. Private insurance remains out of reach

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health

For Latino voters, health care is a top issue as Obamacare gains reverse under Trump

SAN ANTONIO — Larisa Alvarado, 36, feared she had the coronavirus when she woke up last week feeling an itch and pain in her leg that later advanced to swelling. She began running a fever and became nauseous.

A friend and poison control expert suggested her symptoms could be from a spider bite, and advised her to see a doctor. But before she went to an urgent care clinic, Alvarado first had to research the cost of a visit and of the medicine a doctor was likely to prescribe—to see if she could afford them.

That’s because she doesn’t have health insurance. Alvarado lost her job as a patient resource specialist with the American Cancer Society after the organization’s fundraising was hit due to the pandemic.

Alvarado is just one of more than 11.2 million Latinos in the United States who don’t have health insurance—in 2019, almost 17 percent of Hispanics didn’t have health coverage, the highest of any group. That was the figure from before the pandemic, which was already up from 10.22 million in 2016.

Now experts say that number is likely even higher given the pandemic’s disproportionate toll on the community.

As people lose work and health care benefits, it’s become an even tougher task to ensure residents get health coverage access, said Joe Ibarra, co-chair of EnrollSA, a coalition of organizations trying to boost insurance enrollment in the San Antonio area.

“In Texas, there is no expanded Medicaid. The rules are really harsh. Folks are losing coverage as a result of losing their jobs and they are left without good options,” Ibarra told NBC News.

Latinos gained the most under the Affordable Care Act after it was enacted in 2010, with about 4 million adults and 600,000 children obtaining health care coverage by 2016.

As more people lose health insurance, the cost and the availability of coverage are top-tier issues for Hispanics this election cycle. Latinos rank it even ahead of jobs and the economy and place more importance on it than they did about this time in 2016.

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“Latinos are going to the polls keeping health care in mind and their experience with Covid in mind and voting for change for their health and well-being,” Alberto Gonzalez, senior policy strategist at UnidosUS, a Latino civil rights organization, said.

Early in the election cycle, the GOP was pointing to record low unemployment rates Latinos were experiencing as reason to re-elect Trump, while Democrats countered that Hispanics were not economically stable if many had to work more than one job to make ends meet.

But the pandemic’s disproportionate effect on Latinos has forced a reckoning of the gaps in health care coverage, especially in states like Texas with a huge Hispanic population.

Fears of Covid-19 — without health insurance

Before Alvarado lost her job, she was already skimping on her health, forgoing therapy for carpal tunnel to save on the steep copay and deductibles. Now

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