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Lampard has full faith in Kante after questions of Chelsea midfielder’s form, fitness and future

The Blues boss saw the World Cup winner put in another impressive performance against Newcastle, with the Frenchman thriving after shaking off knocks

Frank Lampard claims to have “so much faith” in N’Golo Kante after seeing the Chelsea midfielder face questions of his form, fitness and future.

The France international has two Premier League titles and a World Cup winners’ medal to his name, but has seen a move away from Stamford Bridge mooted.

Speculation was first sparked when Maurizio Sarri took to shifting the 29-year-old out of his favoured holding role.

Lampard has also used Kante in a more advanced position during his reign in west London, but has seen him shine of late in the berth that made him a household name.

Goal 50 Revealed: The best 50 players in the world

Another eye-catching showing sweeping up in front of the Blues’ back four was put in against Newcastle on Saturday, in a 2-0 win for Chelsea, with confidence restored to all concerned.

Lampard told reporters on the influence Kante can have when performing at the peak of his powers: “I know what you mean by quietly influential but he’s much more than that for us.

“Last year he missed 50 per cent of the games with injuries, he had a tough time for different reasons and we are working very hard on that to get him fit and fresh.

“Now we are managing his training and game time, but his levels of performances are really high.

“I keep saying every time I get asked about N’Golo that I have so much faith in him and the top midfield player that he is in world football.

“Not just breaking up and winning balls back, as we know that is a huge quality of his, but his passing and supporting in midfield and playing in that deeper role now has been a very comfortable transition for him. Really, really happy with him.”

Lampard added when asked if he considers Kante to be over the injury issues that have been holding him back: “I don’t want to tempt fate as at the minute he is going well. It’s a constant one for us where we are managing it.

“When I came in at the start of last season he had been injured from the Europa League final and that just rolled on through the year so we just chased it down from there. That was unfortunate and so unfortunate for us to lose him for 50 per cent of the games because of the level of player he is.

“We have had a better period of him to get him in a place where we are really happy with.

“We’re aware and we keep check on his training and numbers and how much distance he travels because every time you train and allow him off the leash in training he makes ridiculous output because of the way he plays.

“We are very careful with that and at the

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fitness

TRX Full Body Fitness System Can Get You Back on Track in 2021

Sponsored content. Us Weekly receives compensation for this article as well as for purchases made when you click on a link and buy something below.

Look, let’s all just admit it: Our fitness regimens have not been up to snuff this year. If you’ve maintained your schedule despite whatever curveballs 2020 hurled your way, more power to you — but not all of Us have been as dedicated, and that’s perfectly fine.

But the thing is, we’re starting to feel a bit sluggish over here. With the holidays coming up, that lack of motivation has the potential to get even worse. Don’t fret — that’s what 2021 is for! You can get a head start on your fitness resolutions now by utilizing an incredibly easy-to-follow program. There are tons of options out there, but we’ve been focused on TRX! Their system is straightforward and effective, and they have kits that make it simple for you to get started.

TRX Full Body Workout Bundle
TRX Full Body Workout Bundle TRX

See it!

Get the TRX Full Body Workout Bundle (originally $230) on sale with free shipping for just $200 from TRX!

The TRX Full Body Workout Bundle is valued way higher than what it costs, especially since it’s on sale right now! This set includes TRX’s signature suspension system, a set of resistance bands, a cute 24 oz. stainless steel water bottle and a full-year membership to the TRX fitness app. This is a well-rounded system that helps you both work out from your home and keep yourself on track (thanks to the app). There are countless workouts for you to follow if you’re not sure where to start. If this is your first time with suspension training, it’s incredibly beneficial to have a helping hand.

The suspension straps may seem daunting, but the app can guide you to work out at the level of which you’re comfortable — whether you’re a beginner or a pro! You can clip them to any stable area in your home or in the backyard, making this a completely portable gym. Combined with the resistance bands, this program targets literally every muscle of the body. It’s your key to completely transforming your physique if you’ve developed a quarantine bod or just want to get lean in the new year! If you start using it now, by the time January rolls around, you’ll be a full-fledged TRX pro.

TRX Full Body Workout Bundle
TRX Full Body Workout Bundle TRX

See it!

Get the TRX Full Body Workout Bundle (originally $230) on sale with free shipping for just $200 from TRX!

So many people have turned to TRX during the quarantine in order to keep up with their workout regimen once gyms shut down, and they are seriously impressed with their results! One reviewer even notes that they love this specific bundle so much, they have abandoned their gym membership completely — despite their fitness center opening back up with safety restrictions and precautions in place! You have to admit that the convenience of TRX gives it

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Treasure Island Center getting new office and fitness tenants, now nearly full

Ben Utecht, a former tight end for the University of Minnesota who went on to play for the Indianapolis Colts and the Cincinnati Bengals, carries a Super Bowl ring from the Colts’ win over the Chicago Bears in 2007.



a car parked in front of a building: The former St. Paul Macy's building will now be called Treasure Island Center and will include a rooftop practice facility for the Minnesota Wild, as well as Looney Bin Brewing, a medical clinic and a two-level Walgreens store. (Rendering courtesy of the St. Paul Port Authority)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
The former St. Paul Macy’s building will now be called Treasure Island Center and will include a rooftop practice facility for the Minnesota Wild, as well as Looney Bin Brewing, a medical clinic and a two-level Walgreens store. (Rendering courtesy of the St. Paul Port Authority)

His next adventure? It’s called Conquer Ninja Gym, a new “American Ninja Warrior”-style practice facility that just signed an 11-year lease in the heart of downtown St. Paul.

By March, he hopes to open inside a 20,000-square-foot skyway-level space shared with D-1 Training, an all-ages gym that specializes in getting high school students ready for Division 1 college sports.

“It’s going to be an interesting 2021,” said Utecht, who plans to open his doors to future ninja warriors ages 5 and up. “It’s really a great business because it focuses on the youth of the community. How do we be a beacon of hope, and show the country, now more than ever, how we can do this together?”

Treasure Island Center, the home of the Minnesota Wild’s rooftop practice hockey rink and assorted government, nonprofit and retail tenants, will soon welcome a bevvy of newcomers — including two gyms, a sports chiropractor and the offices of the St. Paul Port Authority itself.

“That gets us to the point where we’re almost full,” said Andrea Novak, a spokeswoman for the Port Authority. “There’s very little space available at this point.”

After Macy’s department store closed in 2013, the Port Authority reopened the block-length structure in downtown St. Paul in Jan. 2018 as an office-and-retail complex. It has since drawn a mix of ice skaters, craft beer lovers and even a party room overlooking Wabasha Street, but relatively high rents have made filling the massive building tough.

The next crop of tenants may represent the most unique pairings yet, and they complete occupancy in the five-level building’s major spaces, though a series of smaller and oddly-shaped openings could yet be leased.

The building, which spans 540,000 square feet, is now 95 percent full, with 5,675 square feet available.

PORT AUTHORITY OFFICES

The Port Authority — the city’s primary economic development partner — moved into its current home at Infor Commons (formerly Lawson Commons) on St. Peter Street in 2013. After eight years, it plans to relocate by March or April, opening expansion space in Infor for its neighbor, an energy regulator.

“MRO (Midwest Reliability Organization), whom we share the floor with, wanted to expand into the entire floor,” Novak said. “It was an opportunity for us to give them that opportunity to stay in downtown, and for us to move into a building where we have an ownership stake.”

The new offices beneath the grand staircase in Treasure Island Center

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health

Are Trump’s rallies spreading coronavirus? Why it’s hard to know the full impact

(Reuters) – Stanford University economists estimate that President Donald Trump’s campaign rallies have resulted in 30,000 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19, and likely led to more than 700 deaths overall, according to a paper posted online this weekend.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters from the presidential limousine while departing a campaign rally in Newtown, Pennsylvania, U.S., on October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner/File Photo

The research, led by B. Douglas Bernheim, chair of economics at Stanford University, analyzed data following 18 Trump rallies held between June 20 and Sept. 22, three of which were indoors. Bernheim said in an email the work relies on statistical methods to infer causation after an event has occurred.

Infectious disease experts have long suspected that the president’s rallies ahead of the Nov. 3 election might be so-called superspreader events. But so far, scientists have not been able to get a good read on their impact, in part because of a lack of robust contact tracing in many states.

WHAT IS THE CONCERN?

In recent months, Trump has held several dozen rallies in states such as Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where coronavirus infection rates were already on the rise.

At each event, several thousand people were estimated to have participated. While most of the rallies were held outdoors, video footage show that participants gathered in close proximity and many were not wearing masks, creating a risk of spreading the virus as they cheered their candidate on.

“It’s not a major stretch” to say that large unmasked gatherings are likely to spread the virus, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

Adalja said the Stanford paper was “suggestive” of spread from the events, but not definitive because it was not based on an investigation of actual cases. That would help confirm whether participants were exposed to the virus at the event, rather than other places where transmission is rampant.

WHAT DO WE KNOW?

Minnesota public health officials have attributed four COVID-19 outbreaks and more than 25 cases to Trump rallies held in the state in September and October.

An additional 11 state health departments contacted by Reuters said they had not been able to trace infections to the rallies, although some, including Michigan and Wisconsin, have determined that individual people who later tested positive for COVID-19 were present at Trump campaign events.

WHAT DATA ARE NEEDED?

Disease experts say that rigorous contact tracing from one such large event could help arrive at an accurate prediction of how infectious such rallies can be.

But the United States has fallen behind other developed countries in this regard, due to a lack of funding and coordination for contact tracing by the Trump administration.

“The problem is we’ve not done anything to get real numbers,” said Dr. Eric Topol, a genomics expert and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California. Instead, it is subject to conjecture and mathematical models.

For

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health

Explainer: Are Trump’s Rallies Spreading Coronavirus? Why It’s Hard to Know the Full Impact | Top News

By Julie Steenhuysen and Carl O’Donnell

(Reuters) – Stanford University economists estimate that President Donald Trump’s campaign rallies have resulted in 30,000 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19, and likely led to more than 700 deaths overall, according to a paper posted online this weekend.

The research, led by B. Douglas Bernheim, chair of economics at Stanford University, analyzed data following 18 Trump rallies held between June 20 and Sept. 22, three of which were indoors. Bernheim said in an email the work relies on statistical methods to infer causation after an event has occurred.

Infectious disease experts have long suspected that the president’s rallies ahead of the Nov. 3 election might be so-called superspreader events. But so far, scientists have not been able to get a good read on their impact, in part because of a lack of robust contact tracing in many states.

In recent months, Trump has held several dozen rallies in states such as Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where coronavirus infection rates were already on the rise.

At each event, several thousand people were estimated to have participated. While most of the rallies were held outdoors, video footage show that participants gathered in close proximity and many were not wearing masks, creating a risk of spreading the virus as they cheered their candidate on.

“It’s not a major stretch” to say that large unmasked gatherings are likely to spread the virus, said Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

Adalja said the Stanford paper was “suggestive” of spread from the events, but not definitive because it was not based on an investigation of actual cases. That would help confirm whether participants were exposed to the virus at the event, rather than other places where transmission is rampant.

Minnesota public health officials have attributed four COVID-19 outbreaks and more than 25 cases to Trump rallies held in the state in September and October.

An additional 11 state health departments contacted by Reuters said they had not been able to trace infections to the rallies, although some, including Michigan and Wisconsin, have determined that individual people who later tested positive for COVID-19 were present at Trump campaign events.

Disease experts say that rigorous contact tracing from one such large event could help arrive at an accurate prediction of how infectious such rallies can be.

But the United States has fallen behind other developed countries in this regard, due to a lack of funding and coordination for contact tracing by the Trump administration.

“The problem is we’ve not done anything to get real numbers,” said Dr. Eric Topol, a genomics expert and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California. Instead, it is subject to conjecture and mathematical models.  

For example, scientists can use gene sequencing to trace minute changes in the genetic code of the virus as it passes from one person to another, allowing them to develop a map of where the virus travels. Such work has been

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health

Belgium, with EU’s worst COVID numbers, ducks full lockdown

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Belgium stopped short on Friday of confining people to their homes but tightened restrictions on businesses and social life to avert a breakdown of the health system as the country records the highest rate of COVID-19 infections in Europe.

With the resurgent pandemic ravaging the continent, France and Germany announced new lockdowns, including tough restrictions on people’s movement in the former. Other countries in the 27-nation European Union are also curbing daily lives.

Belgium, home to the EU’s headquarters and NATO, announced tighter restrictions on social contacts and the closure for six weeks from Monday of businesses like hairdressers and shops which provide services not considered essential. It also extended November school holidays by an extra week.

Prime Minister Alexander de Croo said the country of 11 million people otherwise faced a breakdown of its health system.

“We are moving in the direction of reinforced confinement with a single objective: to prevent health care from creaking under pressure that is already immense today,” de Croo told a news conference.

“These are the last-chance measures.”

But de Croo did not order a full repeat of the spring lockdown even though Belgium’s COVID-19 numbers are the worst in the EU, Britain and four more associated countries in Europe.

In the second half of October, Belgium reported an average of 1,600 new infections per 100,000 inhabitants, more than twice as many as in France.

It also has one of Europe’s highest mortality rates, according to data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

The latest spike in confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus takes the total number of infections since the beginning of the outbreak to 392,258 in Belgium, according to data from the Sciensano health institute.

This month the country has already put in place a night curfew and closed bars, restaurants, gyms and cultural spaces. But a patchwork of disjointed measures adopted by Belgium’s regions, which have broad powers, in addition to federal action has caused confusion.

Hospital admissions dipped slightly on Thursday to 673, from 743 patients hospitalised with the virus the day before, but the level is still above the peak of the pandemic’s first wave, Sciensano figures showed.

Additional reporting by Robin Emmott, Writing by Gabriela Baczynska, Editing by Catherine Evans

Source Article

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EU won’t see full coronavirus vaccination until 2022, official reportedly warns

Despite several deals securing more than 1 billion doses of a potential coronavirus vaccine, government officials do not expect to be able to vaccinate the full European Union population until 2022, officials reportedly said at a meeting on Monday.  

“There will not be sufficient doses of COVID-19 vaccines for the entire population before the end of 2021,” a European Commission official told diplomats during a closed-door meeting on Monday, according to Reuters.

ITALY PROTESTS OVER LATEST CORONAVIRUS CRACKDOWN TURNS VIOLENT

The majority of nations in the EU, including Belgium, Austria, Germany, France, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands are implementing or considering restrictions on travel, dining, gatherings and more due to a surge in coronavirus cases.

This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel reportedly warned that the country’s health system is being pushed to the brink amid the recent increase in cases. Spain has instituted a nationwide curfew and is mulling potential travel bans to hard-hit areas. In France, a doctor told a radio station that the country has “lost control” of the epidemic and should consider another lockdown.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE EXPERT WARNS FRANCE HAS ‘LOST CONTROL’ 

“We lost control of the epidemic but that doesn’t date from yesterday,” Dr. Eric Caumes, head of infections and tropical disease at Paris’ Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, said, according to the Associated Press. “We lost control of the epidemic several weeks ago already.”

Several challenges to distributing a potential vaccine have been voiced by regulators and experts all over the world. Storage demands and application training are among the chief concerns, with some cautioning that such hurdles could delay delivering the vaccine in remote or hard-to-reach regions. As a result, officials have been asking governments to devise a plan to distribute the vaccine to the most vulnerable populations.

SPAIN ORDERS SECOND NATIONWIDE STATE OF EMERGENCY

The European Medicine Agency, the EU’s drug regulator, has previously stated that it would approve a coronavirus vaccine even if it was below 50% effective but proved safe to use. The EU has already secured doses of potential vaccines from AstraZeneca, Sanofi and Johnson & Johnson, according to Reuters.

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

As of Tuesday, the world had seen more than 42.6 million cases of coronavirus, with the U.S., India, Brazil, Russia and France seeing the highest amount of infection.

Source Article

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El Paso issues curfew to help curb Covid-19 as cases surge and hospitals reach full capacity

El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego issued the curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. starting Sunday night for the next two weeks to help curb the rising rates.

“The purpose of the curfew is to limit mobility in the community,” Samaniego said during a virtual press conference Sunday night, adding that the positivity rate and hospitalizations have exploded in recent weeks. “Currently our hospitals are stretched to capacity,” the judge explained.

The county — which includes the city of El Paso and sits in the southwest border of Texas above Juarez, Mexico — has seen a 160% increase in positivity rate since October 1 and a 300% increase in hospitalizations, the judge said.

“We’ve had significant spikes to the point that our hospital capacity is really tapped. We’re probably at the end of our rope there,” Mayor Dee Margo told CNN’s Ana Cabrera on Newsroom Sunday night. “It’s not good here at all.”

US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) resources will arrive in Texas this week, including two 35-person Disaster Medical Assistance Teams and a Trauma Critical Car Team, according to a statement from Governor Greg Abbott’s office.

On Sunday, 517 new positive Covid-19 cases were reported in the county for a total of 39,326 confirmed cases, according to the City/County of El Paso Covid-19 website. Three new deaths were also reported for a total of 575 deaths, the website shows.

Curfew imposed to slow spread

Samaniego explained that the curfew was put in place instead of another stay at home order because officials want to minimize the economic impact on businesses and families.

“The curfew is enough to limit the economic consequences on local businesses by allowing the stores to stay open. We carefully thought about the economic impact if we were to impose a full stay at home order like we did at the beginning of this process,” Samaniego explained.

“We know the impact it would have for you not to be able to go to work. So we’re going to do everything possible to continue moving towards the balancing of the economy and making sure that we adhere to public health and everything that is required for us to continue our battle against this very insidious virus,” he added.

Audrey Rodriguez of the Bowling Family YMCA in Northeast El Paso prepares the venue for early voting by putting out social distancing and direction markers from the entrance into the parking lot.

Those who don’t comply with orders could face a fine of $250 for not wearing a mask and $500 for not following the order, Samaniego said.

Mayor Margo said that while there hasn’t been one cause identified for the recent surge, many cases have been attributed to community spread and people letting their guard down.

“We did an analysis for two weeks on 2,404 cases from October 6 through October 20 and what we found is that 37% of our positives were from visiting large big-box stores, 22.5% were restaurants, and 19% were travel to Mexico,” Margo explained, adding that 10% were attributed to parties and reunions, 7.5% were due to gyms and only 4% were due to large gatherings.

The mayor urged people to

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Hospitals are full but some parts of Idaho refuse mask rules

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Moments after hearing an Idaho hospital was overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients and looking at sending people as far away as Seattle for care, members of a regional health department board voted Thursday to repeal a local mask mandate.

“Most of our medical surgical beds at Kootenai Health are full,” Panhandle Health District epidemiologist Jeff Lee told board members in the state’s third most populated county.

The hospital in Coeur d’Alene reached 99% capacity a day earlier, even after doubling up patients in rooms and buying more hospital beds. Idaho is one of several states where a surge of COVID-19 infections is overwhelming hospitals, likely in part because cooler weather is sending people indoors, U.S. health officials said.

“We’re facing staff shortages, and we have a lot of physician fatigue. This has been going on for seven months — we’re tired,” Lee said.


He introduced several doctors who testified about the struggle COVID-19 patients face, the burden on hospitals and how masks reduce the spread of the virus.

But the board voted 4-3 to end the mask mandate. Board members overseeing the operations of Idaho’s public health districts are appointed by county commissioners and not required to have any medical experience.

Board member Walt Kirby said he was giving up on the idea of controlling the spread of coronavirus.

“I personally do not care whether anybody wears a mask or not. If they want to be dumb enough to walk around and expose themselves and others, that’s fine with me,” Kirby said. “Nobody’s wearing the damned mask anyway. … I’m sitting back and watching them catch it and die. Hopefully I’ll live through it.”

Another member, Allen Banks, denied COVID-19 exists.

“Something’s making these people sick, and I’m pretty sure that it’s not coronavirus, so the question that you should be asking is, ‘What’s making them sick?’” he told the medical professionals who testified.

Similar scenes — with doctors and nurses asking officials for help, only to be met with reluctance or even open skepticism — have played out across the conservative state. Idaho is sixth in the nation for new coronavirus cases per capita, with the average number of confirmed cases increasing by more than 55% every day over the past two weeks.

Still, Republican Gov. Brad Little has declined to issue a statewide mask mandate or limit crowd sizes beyond requiring social distancing at large events and in businesses, which is seldom enforced. Instead, Little has left it up to local health departments and school districts to make the tough decisions that sometimes come with blowback from the public.

In the southern city of Twin Falls, hospital officials told health board members this week that they too were in danger of being overwhelmed, with one out of every four hospitalized patients sick with COVID-19. The region’s hospitals, operated by St. Luke’s Health System, have been forced to postpone non-emergency surgeries and ship patients elsewhere.

“I want to be very clear: Punting those decisions is saying

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Want to protect people with preexisting conditions? You need the full ACA.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has been hammering home the points that the Trump administration backs that suit, that a Supreme Court with Amy Coney Barrett on it might be sympathetic to the challenge and that the ACA is what stands between voters and the old days when preexisting conditions could disqualify you from coverage.

President Trump, however, continues to insist that although the ACA is bad and should go, “we’re always protecting people with preexisting conditions.”

“I can’t say that more strongly,” he said during his town hall last week.

Republican Senators up for reelection have been making the same claim. “You know, preexisting conditions is something we all agree should be covered,” Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said in a campaign ad this month.

There’s a danger that the two talking points will cancel each other out. (Both sides agree!) That’s why it’s important to understand the facts about why protections for preexisting conditions — the part of the ACA everyone seems to like — cannot be so easily saved if the rest of the law is overturned.

The ACA’s various taxes, subsidies and regulations make it possible for insurance companies to cover people with preexisting conditions (whose health care is generally more expensive). You can’t protect those people without the ACA or a substitute system — and the Republican opponents of the ACA have not offered a viable alternative.

Trump says that he has a competing plan, but what he’s done so far is the equivalent of waving a magic wand. Campaign-trail slogans aside, he issued an executive order saying it is the “policy of the United States” to “ensure that Americans with preexisting conditions can obtain the insurance of their choice at affordable rates.” But the president’s order carries no force of law.

Even if it did, you need a health insurance system, not a simple command from on high to achieve that goal. The details matter a lot here. First, truly protecting people with preexisting conditions requires a whole array of insurance regulations, not just one that generally prohibits discrimination against them. The ACA goes into significant detail to make sure there are no loopholes: It prohibits insurance companies from denying coverage, charging people higher premiums based on their health or gender, limiting benefits tied to preexisting conditions and capping insurance payouts for people who are very sick (either in one year or throughout their lifetimes).

Just as importantly, a plan to protect people with preexisting conditions has to contend with the economic forces that make doing so such a challenge. A key danger is what actuaries ominously call a “death spiral.”

If you guarantee comprehensive insurance to everyone, with no strings attached, people will tend to wait until they’re sick and need the insurance before buying it. With mostly sicker people in the insurance pool, premiums would go up, causing an even larger number of healthier people to drop their coverage. This process would continue and premiums would spiral out of control. The insurance market

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